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Finish for new front door

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Forum topic by RockyTopScott posted 04-26-2009 04:30 AM 5268 views 1 time favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RockyTopScott

1184 posts in 2944 days


04-26-2009 04:30 AM

Topic tags/keywords: finishing mahogany

Installed new mahogany front door today. Someone else made it.

I was considering tung oil because the place where i got the door had one on display. the display was indoors and looked great.

I was wanting to put a finish on it to protect it.

What are my options on top of tung oil? Cal I use poly?

TIA
Scott

-- “When you want to help people, you tell them the truth. When you want to help yourself, you tell them what they want to hear.” ― Thomas Sowell


10 replies so far

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Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 3287 days


#1 posted 04-26-2009 04:50 AM

Yes, you can put poly over tung oil. Another product you might want to consider is spar urethane. It is designed for exterior exposure. I put it on all of my exterior doors, which are wood, when we built our house in 1987. I have only refinished the front doors once during this period simply because they face west and take a beating from the afternoon sun.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

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SteveB

57 posts in 3523 days


#2 posted 04-26-2009 06:44 AM

Here’s what not to do.
My client ordered a custom-made solid mahogany door with leaded sidelites. After I installed it, she had me paint it blue. The same blue as Window’s default. I almost cried.

-- Steve B - New Life Home Improvement

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RockyTopScott

1184 posts in 2944 days


#3 posted 04-26-2009 01:03 PM

Paint? N E V E R!!!!!!!!!!

-- “When you want to help people, you tell them the truth. When you want to help yourself, you tell them what they want to hear.” ― Thomas Sowell

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Moron

5032 posts in 3359 days


#4 posted 04-26-2009 01:41 PM

good quailty marine varnish…..........not the kind you buy at big box stores but rather marine supply stores. Wooden Boat magazine has suppliers

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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tenontim

2131 posts in 3210 days


#5 posted 04-26-2009 03:19 PM

I made the front door on my house and all I put on it is pure tung oil. There’s nothing to peel and it protects very well. Tung oil needs to be reapplied about once a month for about a year, then you can do it once a year.
It only takes about 20 minutes to reapply.

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miles125

2180 posts in 3471 days


#6 posted 04-26-2009 03:37 PM

There are situations where a door takes such a pounding from the sun that paint is the only logical option. Spar varnish with ultrviolet protection is the next best choice if a transparent finish is a must, but it will fail too depending on severity of conditions. You’re on easy street with your choices if the door is in a well protected overhang with little sun.

Just think of it as how to protect a fine piece of furniture that you want to set outside.

-- "The way to make a small fortune in woodworking- start with a large one"

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jcees

1015 posts in 3265 days


#7 posted 04-26-2009 04:06 PM

It is indeed a matter of E X P O S U R E ! ! ! That alone determines what you can do for your door. In Europe what is frequently pointed out is NOT clear finished doors but rather F A U X ”painted” doors. There’s real wood underneath but for pragmatic sake paint affords the most protection from the elements and is actually the easiest to maintain and repair.

Roman is correct in recommending genuine marine coatings for a door that will see the light of day. I can personally recommend Penofin, Interlux, Epifanes and Sikkens. Between these you won’t be displeased though your pocket book will take a hit. But seriously, you can feel it when you pick a can of the stuff. They contain high solids and genuine UV inhibitors. Go by their directions and your door will look great for years.

These guys carry a great supply…

http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/search.do?categoryName=Varnish&categoryId=36&refine=1&page=GRID&history=yiogga7x|top_category|categoryName~Paints^page~GRID^categoryId~532

and here for Penofin…

http://www.worldofstains.com/Penofin-Oil-Finish-for-Hardwoods-p/pe-hardwood-finish.htm

Enjoy!

always,
J.C.

-- When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world. -- John Muir

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RockyTopScott

1184 posts in 2944 days


#8 posted 04-26-2009 08:03 PM

Thanks for all the great input.

The door is covered by a porch and gets mainly morning sun.

Rain never really gets to it unless it is a blowing storm.

-- “When you want to help people, you tell them the truth. When you want to help yourself, you tell them what they want to hear.” ― Thomas Sowell

View LarsCA's profile

LarsCA

16 posts in 2695 days


#9 posted 12-29-2015 12:13 AM


There are situations where a door takes such a pounding from the sun that paint is the only logical option. Spar varnish with ultrviolet protection is the next best choice if a transparent finish is a must, but it will fail too depending on severity of conditions. You re on easy street with your choices if the door is in a well protected overhang with little sun. Just think of it as how to protect a fine piece of furniture that you want to set outside.

- miles125


My door is similar but gets no direct sun (it is set back far enough and faces north), but I wanted to know if an interior finish polyurethane that was developed for floors would work for my door. I already have one coat on it. Should I start putting a water based polyurethane for outdoors over an oil based polyurethane for indoors?

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ThomasChippendale

244 posts in 398 days


#10 posted 12-29-2015 12:43 AM

Rocky

For having varnished and oiled brightwork on boats for the past 45 years, the best finishes I found are Spar Varnish and marine Cetol from Sikkens. For mahogany, Cetol will not come out nice on the color as it is designed for Teak and has a yellow hue but varnishes are well suited for mahogany. My favorite is Epifanes and my close second would be Interlux Goldspar or any of their top end spar varnish.

I start with a oil based red stain that is whipped dry and left to dry for a day. Then I dilute the first coat of varnish 20% in mineral spirit or better, interlux 333. Then 6-7 coats with sanding between coats with 220 grit should get you through 10 years without problems.

Use a quality brush and hold it hairs down in a can of diesel between coats. Spin the diesel off, whipe with mineral spirits and start varnishing again.

If you do the maths, using good products will come out cheaper in the long run, and the peace of mind knowing that you can go another year without coating without your door loosing its finish like oils and interior finishes being put outdoor.

-- PJ

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