LumberJocks

Live edge pine bed finishing help

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by Taizer posted 02-09-2015 04:22 PM 634 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Taizer's profile

Taizer

9 posts in 673 days


02-09-2015 04:22 PM

Hey guys. New here

I have a project that I am doing and just picked up some really nice live edge slabs of clear pine and will be getting some 5×5 pine for the posts. The pine slabs are three inches thick and really nice.

I am building a bed with 5×5 posts for the headboard and footboard. For the horizontal pieces I will be using the live edge pine slabs. Two on the headboard and one on the footboard. I will be leaving the bark on for that rustic finish.

I am looking for some advice on how to finish the pine. The slabs are right off the mill. Not sure if I should sand down to 120 or leave it rough. And not sure if I really want to stain or just apply a protective coat.

Your ideas would be greatly appreciated.


3 replies so far

View HornedWoodwork's profile

HornedWoodwork

222 posts in 682 days


#1 posted 02-09-2015 07:57 PM

Stupid questionm but is the wood green? If it is Greeo you need to KD the wood or wait at least a year before you build with it.

The size of the timber and the live edge should give your project plenty of rustic look. Remember that rustic isn’t the same as rough, many rustic pieces are highly finished and high quality woodwork. Rough work looks and feels wrong. I say sand it and put a nice finish on, nothing too fancy, maybe some poly, maybe a nice oil finish, could be just shellac, nothing too outrageous. The bark can be difficult. As the wood dries out the cambium layer loses it’s adhesive quality and the bark will flake off. There are many solutions for this lincluding flooding the bark layer with epoxy, adding brass nails for support, and even removing and then regluing the bark. I’ve had some succecss with each one of these but they all have their problems. I recommend predrilling holes and using brass nails to secure the bark, choose parts of the bark where the brass nail won’t be easily visible. Don’t use wire nails or anything with iron in contact with the finish or you make have an issue with oxidation.

-- Talent, brilliance, and humility are my virtues.

View Taizer's profile

Taizer

9 posts in 673 days


#2 posted 02-09-2015 08:12 PM

Thanks for the reply hornedwoodwork. The pine slabs have been kiln dried for 2 plus months. I just picked them up last week. But you bring up a good point with regards to drying of the pine. The pine posts are actually from the middle portion of dead pine that was standing for quite a few years. Apparently his bush has been infested with weavil beetle, however there is no damage to the pine i purchased? do you think i need to KD the 5×5 posts? i was going to attach the slabs to the posts with long wood screws. also considered to use a mortise and tenon joint.

I do have polymerized tung oil from lee valley tools. I have the ability to plane up the posts but would have to sand the slabs with my random orbital sander.

with the leftover cuts, I will have enough to make two live edge matching night stands. would you recommend to sand to 120 and then maybe apply an epoxy like envirotex lite for protection? would you recommend polymerized tung oil underneath the poly.

thanks for all your help.

View HornedWoodwork's profile

HornedWoodwork

222 posts in 682 days


#3 posted 02-10-2015 07:21 PM

Sand to 120 and maybe 150 or 180. Would it hurt to KD the posts? if not and the money is not a factor I would, just for stability and to kill anything “lingering” in the wood. I’ve never worked with wood from an infested or rotten source, I’m not much help there I’m afraid.

I think you have a good formula with the Polymerized tung oil/epoxy. That would have a nice soft sheen and feel nice as well. Not too refined. I think that would be a real winner.

As to joinery I am ALWAYS going to tell you to cut a joint versus shooting a screw, but that’s because I’m a very stupid purist. With a project of this scale you kind of have to weigh the benefits of “doing it right” and “getting the damn thing done”

-- Talent, brilliance, and humility are my virtues.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com