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Forum topic by cliftondale posted 02-09-2015 04:18 PM 827 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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cliftondale

4 posts in 664 days


02-09-2015 04:18 PM

Topic tags/keywords: resourcehttplumberjockscomfirst_topicsnew question

i’ve had an issue with end grain cutting boards warping. is this common? i use 11/2 inch thickness, oil the crap out of them. usually happens in first week or 2. tell recipients no to get wet and give them a maintenance guide which cautions against getting them wet. also give them bottle of cutting board oil (mineral oil) and instruct to use frequently.

using rock maple with type 3 glue, run through planer to level surface (very carefully with very minute cuts, many passes)

any ideas or sugestions?

-- CLIFTON gallery


12 replies so far

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1948 days


#1 posted 02-09-2015 04:43 PM

How long has the wood been in your shop acclimating?
Also is there a lot of difference between the humidity where you are and the humidity where the customers are?

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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bondogaposis

4024 posts in 1812 days


#2 posted 02-09-2015 04:45 PM

I always put feet on end grain boards to allow air circulation underneath, I think it helps.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1948 days


#3 posted 02-09-2015 04:46 PM

I would also wonder if you are alternating grain direction of each piece. If not, that could be a major issue at times.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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cliftondale

4 posts in 664 days


#4 posted 02-09-2015 06:26 PM

have feet, acclimatized for over a month, grain is rotated, flipped, reversed, all sales local – same climate

puzzling. i’m thinking of going to 2” thickness

sorry for poor picture quailty and thank you for your responses, appreciate any input

-- CLIFTON gallery

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1948 days


#5 posted 02-09-2015 06:48 PM

Ummmm, the grain is not rotated, flipped or changed according to the pictures you show. All the grain is going top right to bottom left and with end grain what you have made is essentially an edge grain across the whole width.
Turn alternating pieces opposite to the previous piece. You will have many fewer problems with warping and miss-alignment.

(Edit): Not important, but just a question about the blood grooves.
Thinking this through, where is the juice, blood, liquid suppose to go before the board gets cleaned?

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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cliftondale

4 posts in 664 days


#6 posted 02-09-2015 07:23 PM

Turn alternating pieces opposite to the previous piece. You will have many fewer problems with warping

do you mean turn alternating grain perpendicular?

-- CLIFTON gallery

View Dan658's profile

Dan658

93 posts in 730 days


#7 posted 02-09-2015 07:54 PM


do you mean turn alternating grain perpendicular?

- cliftondale

Yes. All you did was flip the wood 180 degrees leaving the grain going in the same direction. What you need is alternating 90 degree directions to make the board more stable.

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Dallas

3599 posts in 1948 days


#8 posted 02-09-2015 08:02 PM

Yu need one block going top right to bottom left, next, Top left to bottom right. As an added plus, flip each block over so the grain of the tree is going first up and then down.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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SASmith

1850 posts in 2448 days


#9 posted 02-09-2015 09:32 PM

Do you use the same amount of oil on the front and back?
I have warped a board by applying more oil to the front.

-- Scott Smith, Southern Illinois

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cliftondale

4 posts in 664 days


#10 posted 02-09-2015 10:48 PM

that’s possible, one likes to think that is not the case but i do start oiling on top and then the bottom. i’m going to change my approach to conditioning by submersing in tank for one week so board is completely surrounded while conditioning.

-- CLIFTON gallery

View JimRochester's profile

JimRochester

376 posts in 1075 days


#11 posted 02-15-2015 02:47 PM

The planer will make the board smoother and thinner but won’t necessarily flatten it. I always rely on the drum sander to flatten. It doesn’t have the downward force of the planer and takes off less with each pass.

-- Schooled in the advanced art of sawdust and woodchip manufacturing.

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sras

4391 posts in 2590 days


#12 posted 02-15-2015 03:45 PM

Here is a link to a pretty good video about end grain construction. It shows the technique of alternating the grain.

There is a second part that deals with assembly and finish.

Another thing I have found is that a perfectly flat board will warp if stored flat on a counter top (with no feet). Moisture changes in the air will cause the top side to expand or contract.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

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