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Cant bring myself to do it.....

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Forum topic by Garbanzolasvegas posted 02-08-2015 04:25 PM 1410 views 2 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Garbanzolasvegas

356 posts in 693 days


02-08-2015 04:25 PM

I am getting towards the end of my latest project. A mobile rustic kitchen pine island. Casters not on yet. BUT I want it to looked Rustic and worn and maybe weathered.

But after screwing it all together I cant make myself submit it to the (FLOGGING) beating it with CHAIN and hammer and eye gouger poker stick thingy to get that worn look. and it hasn’t even peed or pooped on the floor like so many dogs and cats want to do. I cant seem to make myself PUNISH it for not doing anything bad

Also I can’t seem to make a discussion on the finish. I watched a guy on YOUTUBE speaking very profoundly about finishing furniture and I quote…

“Finishing brings a piece of work to life, It can bring a lousy piece of work to life and look amazing, or kill a brilliant piece of woodwork…” Unquote

Words to heed.

I don’t like dark wood such as walnut or dark stained wood. I am thinking of beating the hell out of it, maybe chain it to the back of my truck and then drive into town for a milkshake with it in tow.

Then a very light stain then then simply wax the piece and even mate put on some dark wax. I read some very good reviews on Fiddes & Sons Supreme Wax Polish and got some FINISHING wax from minwax, to kick their tires

The top I will just use butcher block oil as I plan to cut right on top of it.

Any opinions from more experienced wood workers is not only wanted but they are very much appreciated !

-- If you don't Play, you can't win


26 replies so far

View Don Broussard's profile

Don Broussard

3022 posts in 1717 days


#1 posted 02-08-2015 04:52 PM

My wife and I have bathroom cabinets that are only slightly distressed. We didn’t go as far as flogging with chains, but we do have some hammerhead marks, some awl pokes, some screw thread impressions and some impressed springs to mock worm hole tracks. The impressions were stained dark then sanded and finished. Looks pretty nice. I’m not sure I’d drag that pretty piece behind my truck either. Nice job on the island.

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!

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Picklehead

1017 posts in 1395 days


#2 posted 02-08-2015 05:52 PM

But after screwing it all together I cant make myself submit it to the (FLOGGING) beating it with CHAIN and hammer and eye gouger poker stick thingy to get that worn look. and it hasn t even peed or pooped on the floor like so many dogs and cats want to do. I cant seem to make myself PUNISH it for not doing anything bad

I am thinking of beating the hell out of it, maybe chain it to the back of my truck and then drive into town for a milkshake with it in tow.

Then a very light stain then then simply wax the piece and even mate put on some dark wax.

- Garbanzolasvegas

It sounds like the product you’re looking for is Minwax’s new ”Fifty Shades of Grey”!

-- You've got to be smarter than the tree.

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 688 days


#3 posted 02-08-2015 06:39 PM

Garbanzolasvegas

That is one sharp build congrats. I’d let it distress natural like, a yr down the road all the hacks, slashes, bangs and drops will make it looked old enough. I don’t buy prewashed/stone washed/distressed dungarees either. I’ve bought a few used tools and used trucks but that’s it. It’s the journey that counts.

-- I meant to do that!

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REO

889 posts in 1540 days


#4 posted 02-08-2015 06:52 PM

years ago I worked with my dad in his shop. I spent the better part of three days getting an 11 foot diameter fir round table ready for finish. It was leaved to go together in sections. It was a part of a display for a “knights of the round table” feel. several weeks later my dad went to bid on another project for the same fellow. He said he was glad I didn’t go along. They had used all sorts of barbaric tools on it to distress it. there was a knife and a broad axe still left sticking in the top. and chunks of it were hewn out!

Your project looks wonderful the way it is! makes you really wonder if the customer really is always right.lol

View ChuckC's profile

ChuckC

821 posts in 2401 days


#5 posted 02-08-2015 07:53 PM

I would leave it too. Maybe some milk paint and sand some of the edges. It will get distressed all on its own.
BTW, Nice job!

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mcg1990

159 posts in 758 days


#6 posted 02-08-2015 08:59 PM

I wouldn’t do too much to it, either. A few weeks ago I made a truss table and liked it so much I didn’t want to beat it up. It was also the first time I’d tried out Gel stains, and I found that it beautifully showed off small imperfections without giving it a blotchy look. I then finished it off with 2 or 4 coats of semi-gloss polycrilic (although in hindsight I should have used polyurethane) and there you go.

It gave it a rustic look without the over-done “I’M TRYING TO MAKE CONSTRUCTION LUMBER LOOK LIKE AN ANTIQUE LOL” feel.

View daddywoofdawg's profile

daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1041 days


#7 posted 02-08-2015 09:15 PM

any distressing you do should be from how it’s used,most people just beat the cr@p out of it but why?real looking distress means edges worn in places,top and or bottoms of drawer faces worn missing paint etc from normal use, worn spots on the top from use.I.E think about how it would be used then accurate the wear.If it suppose to look like it was made from old barn board then beat the hell out of it,but if it’s to look like it was/is fine furniture that has been around for ever then look at the furniture you have and the wear,that is from day to day living and how it should look.

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NoThanks

798 posts in 995 days


#8 posted 02-08-2015 09:26 PM

Just do it.
Here is a sample of a pc I did in Alder
It may be a little heavier than you want, buy I like the marks myself.

-- Because I'm gone, that's why!

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1667 posts in 2090 days


#9 posted 02-08-2015 09:55 PM

I have a regular customer that likes the ‘distressed’ look. I have built them a bed, table and TV stand. At first they wanted barn wood. We priced it but it was way out of their budget. We resorted to BORG construction lumber. The builds take a day or two but distressing that stuff takes a good two days. Angle grinder. Various blunt objects. Propane torch. Not too much on the chain but I do lay chain on a piece and walk on it. It is nearly an artform.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

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runswithscissors

2192 posts in 1491 days


#10 posted 02-09-2015 12:22 AM

I like the distressed look, but have doubts about faux distressing. The right way to make a piece look like an antique is to make or buy it, and use it everyday for 75 to 100 years. Definitely turn the kids and grandkids loose on it. (We bought a vintage 1900 house some years ago, and all the window casings were beat up reaching to around 4’ or 5’ above the floor. I surmised the previous inhabitants had issued hatchets to all their children at about the age of 5).

Just another way of saying what others have said above.

Of course some distressed looking pieces simply look like old shabby crap. I can’t help thinking what Ikea furniture made from sawdust and snot will look like in antique stores of the future.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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Garbanzolasvegas

356 posts in 693 days


#11 posted 02-09-2015 12:46 AM



I wouldn t do too much to it, either. A few weeks ago I made a truss table and liked it so much I didn t want to beat it up. It was also the first time I d tried out Gel stains, and I found that it beautifully showed off small imperfections without giving it a blotchy look. I then finished it off with 2 or 4 coats of semi-gloss polycrilic (although in hindsight I should have used polyurethane) and there you go.

It gave it a rustic look without the over-done “I M TRYING TO MAKE CONSTRUCTION LUMBER LOOK LIKE AN ANTIQUE LOL” feel.

- mcg1990


Love the table… I too used mostly construction grade lumber. I think after listening to you all I will leave it alone and let LIFE beat it up such as it has done to me. After all I won’t want anyone to come out of the gate and beat my ass with a chain for nothing

-- If you don't Play, you can't win

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

2635 posts in 2575 days


#12 posted 02-09-2015 01:39 AM



I like the distressed look, but have doubts about faux distressing. The right way to make a piece look like an antique is to make or buy it, and use it everyday for 75 to 100 years. Definitely turn the kids and grandkids loose on it. (We bought a vintage 1900 house some years ago, and all the window casings were beat up reaching to around 4 or 5 above the floor. I surmised the previous inhabitants had issued hatchets to all their children at about the age of 5).

Just another way of saying what others have said above.

Of course some distressed looking pieces simply look like old shabby crap. I can t help thinking what Ikea furniture made from sawdust and snot will look like in antique stores of the future.

- runswithscissors

That IKEA stuff will end up in a landfill, right up until the Gov discovers that the components are carcinogenic in some way. I see that stuff sitting at the curb for “bulk pickup”, as we call it here. The junk mongers that pick up metal and so forth left at the curb won’t even touch it, for free. It isn’t even good for firewood. That has to be pretty embarrassing to IKEA. It would be for me.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

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Garbanzolasvegas

356 posts in 693 days


#13 posted 02-09-2015 07:20 AM

I cant stop running my hands over my latest creation. Much satisfaction creating a beautiful object with my own hands.

-- If you don't Play, you can't win

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Garbanzolasvegas

356 posts in 693 days


#14 posted 02-09-2015 08:03 AM


I wouldn t do too much to it, either. A few weeks ago I made a truss table and liked it so much I didn t want to beat it up. It was also the first time I d tried out Gel stains, and I found that it beautifully showed off small imperfections without giving it a blotchy look. I then finished it off with 2 or 4 coats of semi-gloss polycrilic (although in hindsight I should have used polyurethane) and there you go.

It gave it a rustic look without the over-done “I M TRYING TO MAKE CONSTRUCTION LUMBER LOOK LIKE AN ANTIQUE LOL” feel.

- mcg1990


I am trying to get away from Polys and the like and go with oils and Waxes

-- If you don't Play, you can't win

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Garbanzolasvegas

356 posts in 693 days


#15 posted 02-09-2015 08:10 AM

This is the first project I used a Kreg jig on as well.. .I am not sure I like it BUT it does solve more than one joinery issue. I would have preferred mortise and tenon but some how Amazon lost my order for necessary parts to make that happen. But of course they showed up just as I drove the last Kregs Screw in

One thing is for sure when using a Kregs jig. YOU HAVE TO CLAMP IT and CLAMP IT HARD or the members will slide out of true

-- If you don't Play, you can't win

showing 1 through 15 of 26 replies

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