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replacing leg on craftsman table saw

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Forum topic by goodyt posted 02-07-2015 07:19 AM 1187 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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goodyt

9 posts in 2571 days


02-07-2015 07:19 AM

I have Craftsman Professional Hybrid 10” Table Saw. Model 152.221240 on which I have bent a leg on the cabinet. My query is about changing the bent leg (actually two legs since they are designed with two legs already joined together.

Since this saw weighs in at about 425#, I have no one to assist me, and I am in my 70s, my specific question has to do with the requisite/appropriate prep work leading up to the change out.

My thoughts, at this moment are:

1. remove the three (3) cast iron table tops before beginning any replacement efforts, i.e., turning the cabinet upside down, or
2. using a hydraulic lift, e.g., like an engine lift, without having to turn the cabinet upside down

Main question: First, would lifting the entire saw by using a chain and lift arrangement damage the table tops and/or alignment of same, and Second, is there a danger that he saw could not be safely held by the tops, therefore allowing the saw to fall-with me under it!

Thank you in advance for any suggestions.


21 replies so far

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knotscott

7207 posts in 2835 days


#1 posted 02-07-2015 01:25 PM

The 22124 didn’t have legs, it had a full floor to top enclosure. You must have a 22104 or 22114 from the same line, which had 3/4 enclosures on short legs. Pics would clarify which one, but it really doesn’t matter as the fix is going to be the same.

It’d be easier if you could solicit some help, but if not, you could try a heavy strap under one side and relieve the weight with your engine lift. Then straighten and reinforce the leg(s), or you could replace the entire leg section with something else….

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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goodyt

9 posts in 2571 days


#2 posted 02-07-2015 01:50 PM

Sorry my misleading info on the saw model!

Scott,

Thank you for your response. You are correct, my saw is a 351.221140-what I get for trying to rely on my memory at 1:00 in the morning.

I have already purchased the leg assembly, but my concern is about the requisite dismantling to install the new assembly. In order to replace the leg(s), I must first remove the “floor” of the dust collection chute under the saw and the remove/replace the leg assembly-which mean getting under the saw. Ergo, my earlier statement about the saw falling on me if I tried to use a lift.

Perhaps I just need to bite the bullet and dismantle the table tops so that I can then upend the saw cabinet and get to the undercarriage without any weight on it.

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patcollins

1420 posts in 2325 days


#3 posted 02-07-2015 02:20 PM

I would try to jam some 2×4s under the table on the side you are working on to steady it in addition to the engine lift but I would also try to get some help. At the very least take a phone with you and have it within reach, unlock the door etc in case something does happen so the rescue squad could get to you incase.

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knotscott

7207 posts in 2835 days


#4 posted 02-07-2015 02:55 PM

Sorry my misleading info on the saw model! ...my saw is a 351.221140-what I get for trying to rely on my memory at 1:00 in the morning.
- goodyt

LOL…no worries. If that’s the worse thing I encounter today, it’s gonna be a great day! ;-)

It is a heavy saw….removing the wings can shed 90-100# from the equation. Taking off the top sheds even more wieght.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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mcg1990

159 posts in 752 days


#5 posted 02-07-2015 05:05 PM

I had a similar situation with my 22124 (the enclosed cabinet) where I forgot to screw in the adjustable feet. I took two of my Irwin clamps and switched the head from one end to the other, which turns the clamp into a spreader. I put two of them under an extension wing and pumped it a little and it easily provided clearance to screw in the feed underneath.

Now, with your issue I’d do this, providing you have clamps with a similar function (or a few bottle jacks):

Build a couple of saw-horses that will be a few inches taller that your table saw. Using clamps as a spreader, or a bottle jack, lift up one wing of the table saw and place one saw horse underneath. Now repeat on the other side. What you’ll have is your table saw suspended a few inches off the ground supported by your two (sturdily built) saw horses. That should give you the space you need to get under and unbolt then change out the base.

I get that it’s not perfectly safe to then work underneath it, but I don’t know what else to suggest other than fully disassembling and flipping over the saw, which has it’s own complications. No matter what you shouldn’t do this on your own.

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goodyt

9 posts in 2571 days


#6 posted 02-07-2015 05:43 PM

Pat, Scott & MCG,

Many thanks to all of you for your input. This what I get for being old and NOT having a bunch of sons running around to do the heavy lifting! :-)

I have been looking at the saw this morning with all of your suggestions in mind. This was when I remembered how the leg assembly got bent in the first place. I had mounted the saw on a mobile base as I originally put the saw together. Then, one day while moving the saw up a ramp into the shop one of the mobile base wheels hit something big enough to stop it in its tracks + my pushing on the saw caused it to topple to one side-ergo, bent leg.

Based the preceding, I think maybe if I follow MCG’s idea of jacking the unit with bottle jacks might give me the best result without tilting the saw enough bend the other leg assembly b y placing too much strain on it.

Thanks again, guys. I will report back in the near future to advise on my success. I hope.

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mcg1990

159 posts in 752 days


#7 posted 02-07-2015 05:55 PM

Take it slow and don’t raise one side fully before doing the other. Bring each side up a couple of ‘pumps’ in turn. And just don’t do this alone, no matter what method you take.

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

3599 posts in 1947 days


#8 posted 02-07-2015 07:06 PM

A cheap, hydraulic jack with a brace on top will raise both legs at the same time.
Either bring it up until everything is level and shim, or remove the legs if possible.

If you want it on a box, use one jack and two jack stands or something to level it and remove the legs.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

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SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3045 days


#9 posted 02-07-2015 09:55 PM

Yes I have a table saw and a large industrial ras saw not far from it.When I placed wood onto the RAS to be cut I encountered a problem with different table heights.The RAS was lower than the tablesaw .Stopping a good flow of work using the sliding table saw as an extended table to rest larger pieces of timber on while cutting them with the RAS.
It was about five inches lower. I measured each leg quadrant very carefully and made risers from plywood and a good quality toe jack with a block of wood onto it placed it in a good position under the RAS and lifted it to slide the packer piece carefully under each of the four stout legs.It Worked very well, with little fuss by me and me alone.Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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OldEd

39 posts in 1072 days


#10 posted 02-08-2015 12:53 AM

Bottle Jacks – as in more than one. 4×4 or 4×6 under the cabinet with a bottle jack at each end. Jack it up slowly and evenly. Have a buddy helping you – NOT your wife, sister, daughter, weak-knee’d son or son-in-law…

Two buddies is better. Examine what you can with a mirror- DON’T put any part of your body that you or someone dear to you would miss under the saw.

Removing the wings is a good start – the table can stay on. Take off the fence, etc. and anything else that is easy to remove. Or even not so easy, if you will possibly bang your head on it. It is fragile enough already, or at least mine is, according to my wife (I’m 74).

With the buddies, a good set of wrenchs, and the soldiers awaiting you and your crew in the fridge, the job should be a piece of cake. Just do the baking when the distaff side of the house is out for a major shop or something. Nothing will kill the project worse than her coming home and finding you under 400 lbs of steel.

I don’t think

-- OldEd

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OldEd

39 posts in 1072 days


#11 posted 02-08-2015 12:56 AM

Sorry about that: I don’t know where the “I don’t think” came from. Well, I do, but I thought I deleted it.

Just for the record, I have learned that thinking things through before you start to work is (a) annoying as hell to my wife, and (b) gets the job done so easily that she says “Why did you waste all that time thinking about it???”

-- OldEd

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patcollins

1420 posts in 2325 days


#12 posted 02-09-2015 10:33 PM

Did you get the legs replaced? Hope you came out of it ok.

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goodyt

9 posts in 2571 days


#13 posted 02-09-2015 11:07 PM

Many thanks to all of you gentlemen for your ideas/input. I feel much more comfortable about proceeding with the task after reviewing the various suggestions.

However, what I did not share in the beginning is my current physical status. Back in June 2014, while building a 2nd story deck on our house, I stepped backwards onto what I thought was a joist behind me and fell 12’ to the ground. End result, 3 cracked ribs and a compression fracture of 1 vertebra. (Guess what: I don’t bounce as well at 74 as I did at 30!)

Anyhow, I am on restricted duty until maybe April/May, so in the interim, I will be cogitatin’ the process and building up my nerve. I promise to check back when the dirty deed is complete, but, once again, thanks for “being there” when I needed help.

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OldEd

39 posts in 1072 days


#14 posted 02-10-2015 12:31 AM

Hey guy, where do you live? I’m 74 also. I haven’t broken anything yet, but I do have a defibrillator and a kidney transplant. Maybe if we get together two 74yo rambling wrecks will equal one able 37yo…

-- OldEd

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patcollins

1420 posts in 2325 days


#15 posted 02-10-2015 01:25 AM

OMG I am 40 and I swear that would take me out of commission. Sorry about your fall but damn you sound like a tough fella.

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