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My New Delta-Rockwell 900 RAS

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Forum topic by Dan658 posted 02-07-2015 12:23 AM 783 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dan658

93 posts in 734 days


02-07-2015 12:23 AM

Thanks to the LJ’s who gave me some great insight before making the purchase. This is my first radial arm saw and I literally knew nothing about them, other than they can cut your arm off. I’ve been considering one for a little while now since I see them for sale all the time and usually quite cheap. I got this one for $50. My reasoning is that my sliding miter saw takes up too much room and while I prefer to use my crosscut sled whenever I can, it’s just impossible to do with long boards and limited space. That and I like getting new tools…. The fact that I can build it into a bench is a big plus for me and that’s exactly what I’ll do. Anyone know how to date one of these things?



The handle on it is really small and awkward in the hand, so I’m going to add onto the handle. I picked up a $3 bag of bubinga plane and tool handles from Lee Valley a while back and I finally found a use for one of them. I just quickly cut out the shape on the bandsaw and will do more shaping later.


15 replies so far

View MAKZ06's profile

MAKZ06

50 posts in 1269 days


#1 posted 02-07-2015 12:30 AM

$50 bucks?? You suck!
Great find. I’ve been hunting a good one like that to replace my Craftsman.
I don’t care what anyone says. If you know what you are doing and take proper care, you can’t beat a good radial arm for certain operations.

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Dan658

93 posts in 734 days


#2 posted 02-07-2015 03:17 AM



$50 bucks?? You suck!
Great find. I ve been hunting a good one like that to replace my Craftsman.

- MAKZ06

Haha, thanks. I always seem to get the “it just sold” when I contact a seller, but it feels good to get a good find.

View Rick Bailey's profile

Rick Bailey

247 posts in 826 days


#3 posted 02-07-2015 03:29 AM

You Sir SUCK in a kind and good way. ;-)
Good job.
Rick

-- I'll bulid your dream,you tear it down.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3942 posts in 1958 days


#4 posted 02-07-2015 12:17 PM

Good deal…should serve you very well. As for the “cutting off the arm” part, it’s only one of several woodshop machines that have that capability. Congrats….

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Dan658

93 posts in 734 days


#5 posted 02-07-2015 05:52 PM



Good deal…should serve you very well. As for the “cutting off the arm” part, it s only one of several woodshop machines that have that capability. Congrats….

- Fred Hargis

Very true. The arm comment was mostly a joke, but it’s unfamiliarity that is the scary part for me. My father has and used one for 30 years with no problems or lost limbs. I like to keep a healthy fear of all my tools to keep me from getting complacent and this one will be no different.

I have a question about lubricating. I’ve found that most people online mention using dry lube on the post while some use wax, but hardly anyone mentions the sliding track. What do you guys do for lubricating?

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Fred Hargis

3942 posts in 1958 days


#6 posted 02-07-2015 08:20 PM

I don’t use anything on the column of my Dewalts, but the screw inside the column that raises and lowers the arm needs some grease. As for the “sliding track”. I’m thinking you are referring to the part the carriage (motor assembly) slides back and forth on? The carriage is riding on bearings, so no lube is needed. If I guessed wrong: apologies. BTW, I really like that bubinga handle piece you did, cool!

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Dan658

93 posts in 734 days


#7 posted 02-07-2015 08:52 PM



As for the “sliding track”. I m thinking you are referring to the part the carriage (motor assembly) slides back and forth on? The carriage is riding on bearings, so no lube is needed. If I guessed wrong: apologies. BTW, I really like that bubinga handle piece you did, cool!

- Fred Hargis

That’s it. The carriage moves freely, but it’s not as smooth as most seem to be, so I should check the bearings out instead of lubing track. I’ll also take a look at the column screw. This has been sitting unused in a carport for quite a few years after the original owner passed away, so I imaging it needs to be cleaned and greased.

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Dan658

93 posts in 734 days


#8 posted 02-07-2015 09:12 PM

Fred, I also took your advice and looked into the Freud and the only local tool store that has them wants $120-$130 depending on whether I want the red coating or not. IMO, they want way too much considering I paid about that for both my 10” 60 and 24 tooth Industrial series blades together. Even if I wanted to spend that kind of money on an 8.5” blade, I’d get the Forrest 8.5” x 60-Tooth Chopmaster for $10 more at Lee Valley. I haven’t found any Canadian online retailers that sell the 8.5” LU91 and while prices in the US are far more reasonable, the Canadian dollar isn’t doing too well right now and after shipping and customs, I’m likely to be back up around the $120 mark again.

I can get the Diablo series D0860S with a 7 deg hook locally for $55. I know you guys recommend a negative hook, but I’m thinking I can just deal with it and save $75. I don’t know…. I’m in no rush at the moment since there’s a few things that need to be done before I start using it.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

3942 posts in 1958 days


#9 posted 02-07-2015 09:24 PM

But for the carriage bearings, it’s common for them to be stuff, and they usually clean up really well. You don’t need to worry about repacking them, they don’t do enough motion to make it important. As for the positive hook, all I can say is try it and see how it goes.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View SCOTSMAN's profile

SCOTSMAN

5839 posts in 3050 days


#10 posted 02-07-2015 09:27 PM

That was a steal ! not a simple buy-purchase , the motor alone would be worth more than that.LOL Have safe fun Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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Dan658

93 posts in 734 days


#11 posted 02-07-2015 11:38 PM

Here’s a Super 900 for $30 if there’s any LJ’s near Vancouver, BC. The cost of a ferry ride off then back onto the island doesn’t make it worth it for me.

http://vancouver.craigslist.ca/rds/tls/4880924629.html

View Mwmx54's profile

Mwmx54

4 posts in 708 days


#12 posted 02-08-2015 12:30 AM

That is a steal! Nice find. I paid 3 times that for my POS craftsman.

View Kaleb the Swede's profile

Kaleb the Swede

1731 posts in 1434 days


#13 posted 02-08-2015 12:45 AM

Yep you suck

-- Just trying to build something beautiful

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Dan658

93 posts in 734 days


#14 posted 02-08-2015 02:50 AM

So the wife left to go see the inlaws for a few days which meant I could stop being productive around the house and go play with the saw. I was really curious about the carriage bearings, so I went into the basement to pull it apart and see what I can do.

I first pulled off the bearing covers to see what I was getting into. As you can see, even the outside of the bearings had crap stuck to them. After that, I took the face plate off the arm and pulled the carriage off so I could remove the bearings all together.

I have a tendency to get ahead of myself when working on my own projects and this time it was when I was remove the bearing bolts. I started loosening one of the bolts on the right side and it was very stiff and I kept turning it until I noticed a little hole just under it. Right away I realized I was fighting a set screw. So I loosened that off and proceeded to take off the bearing bolt while hoping I didn’t damage the bolt too much and luckily for me, I didn’t. I stopped a hair before the threads. I’m lucky because both bolts on the right have an offset bearing mount to adjust the bearings on the track and remove any play. I don’t even know where I’d get a replacement for something like that. The joys of figuring sh** out for the first time….

While the carriage was off, I cleaned out the track really well and wiped some paste wax in there. I figure it will help prevent the bare metal from rusting and even though it needs no lube, a little wax can’t hurt. I got all the visible junk off the bearings and while they definitely don’t spin like a new bearing, they are no longer stiff and there are no signs that there is any damage inside so they are good enough to go back on. It may not glide like it’s floating, but it’s smooth now and that’s good enough for me.

View NormG's profile

NormG

5506 posts in 2468 days


#15 posted 02-08-2015 03:04 AM

Great purchase

-- Norman - I never never make a mistake, I just change the design.

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