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Forum topic by Clos posted 02-06-2015 02:34 AM 624 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Clos

16 posts in 690 days


02-06-2015 02:34 AM

That any one can tell me more about CNC router machine I ben looking in to Laguna and some other one I don’t want to spend to much it the firs time oar any one is saling one

-- Carlos Valentine


6 replies so far

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Jeff_in_LSMO

340 posts in 1805 days


#1 posted 02-06-2015 04:43 PM

I will try to find the guy’s name who was in a non-CNC class I took, who happened to be a CNC rep. He was more on the industrial scale, but had a lot of experience with several “hobby” or wood use machines. He was more than happy to discuss CNC and programming with me.

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Clos

16 posts in 690 days


#2 posted 02-06-2015 04:51 PM

ok thanks

-- Carlos Valentine

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brtech

903 posts in 2387 days


#3 posted 02-06-2015 05:53 PM

This is too general of a question to answer. I will say that the learning curve on a CNC is very steep, and the payback is a while. That doesn’t have anything to do with the choice of machine.

CNC machines are selected based on:
1. Working area = 3 dimensional area the tool can be located in. This is the biggest work piece, although you can stick an end of a work piece in the bed of the machine and have the other end stick out on most machines
2. Speed – how fast the tool can be moved, both between tool paths and along a tool path. This relates to motor power and the mechanism to couple the motor to the gantry.
3. Accuracy = what the positional accuracy of the tool positioning is. Sometimes the spec is not all there is. For example if the positioner is really accurate but the frame flexes, the resulting accuracy is low.
4. Spindle – what is the part that rotates with the bit. There are low end, Dremel type spindles, small, medium and large routers, and spindles built expressly for CNC machines that have various properties like speed, speed control, torque, bit range, etc.
5. Software – what comes with the machine, and what is compatible with it. There are 3 pieces of software to worry about – the drafting/design part, the “CAM” part that turns the design into tool paths, and the driver part that makes the machine follow the tool path
6. Features. There are always features that may make a difference to you, like how work is held down, how you zero the tool, dust collection.

The Laguna machines seem to be expensive for a given set of specs, but are more complete than some machines you will find. The expense isn’t in the completeness – Apples for Apples, they are expensive, period.

There is a whole lot of DIY in CNC if you are in to that sort of thing.

I highly recommend cnczone.com

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Clos

16 posts in 690 days


#4 posted 02-06-2015 06:38 PM

Thanks brtech the cost almost the same

-- Carlos Valentine

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brtech

903 posts in 2387 days


#5 posted 02-06-2015 06:42 PM

Compared to what?

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helluvawreck

23175 posts in 2331 days


#6 posted 02-06-2015 06:47 PM

You might take a look at these: I looked at them good at the Atlanta IWF and I’ve been to their headquarters which happens to be in my home town. If my business goes ok I may be getting one in a year or so.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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