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first time useing new router and table, help me not die

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Forum topic by MrBigHug posted 02-05-2015 12:11 AM 1002 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrBigHug

16 posts in 736 days


02-05-2015 12:11 AM

So,

I have installed my dewalt 2 1/4 Hp into my grizzley router table. I have a large yonico crown molding bit, I have a 2×6x6’ piece of lumber with a few knots but pretty good. More than anything I am just trying to practice for when I am ready to do crown for my home. I will make sure the board is supported correctly and I was planning on doing multiple passes to reduce the chance of lossing control of the wood going by 1/8 inch-1/4 inch increments. Since it is a matched crown bit I was going to run the 2×6 through twice each pass the second time turning the piece over to do the other side , before exposing more of the bit so it stays even. I was also going to feed slowly no faster than an inch a second. Is there anything else you would recomend to keep me safe and successful? I do not have a featherboard or any other way to feed the board without having to push it against the frame. Thanks for any suggestions!


16 replies so far

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2158 days


#1 posted 02-05-2015 12:59 AM

Clamp a 1x to the fence to hold your stock down against the table and use a second 1x to hold it against the fence. I would use a push ‘shoe’ to feed the stock across the bit rather than my fingers (just in case). The rate of feed is determined by the toughness of your stock, sharpness of your bit, and speed/horsepower of your router. Too slow and it will tend to leave burn marks.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View goochs's profile

goochs

56 posts in 697 days


#2 posted 02-05-2015 01:15 AM

If you are using a variable speed router I would also use a slower speed because of the size of the bit.

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

2635 posts in 2577 days


#3 posted 02-05-2015 02:24 AM

By rights, you should be doing this on a shaper instead of a router. Good luck with it.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13529 posts in 1324 days


#4 posted 02-05-2015 02:33 AM

Are you sure you need to start with a 2×6. Don’t use anything larger than you need to make the piece. I’ve never used a crown bit so I’m just guessing. I think you still want to use the speed that coincides with the diameter of the bit. It may be tall, but it is probably not that wide.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View Garbanzolasvegas's profile

Garbanzolasvegas

356 posts in 695 days


#5 posted 02-05-2015 02:36 AM

Have you tried this?

-- If you don't Play, you can't win

View MrBigHug's profile

MrBigHug

16 posts in 736 days


#6 posted 02-05-2015 06:06 PM

Here is the bit I am using. http://www.precisionbits.com/large-reversible-crown-molding-router-bit-1-2-shank-yonico-16151.html . I chose the 6 inch height because the bit is 3 inches tall and reversable. I did read the depth incorrectly I thought it was 3/4 inch that would be removed from the stock, but it is only 1/4 inch so a 1×6 probably would work fine. Also I have found a few DIY featherboard websites and I think I have decided to follow gfadvm suggestion and get a vertical and horizontal support before proceeding. Thank you for all the help.

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

800 posts in 1576 days


#7 posted 02-05-2015 07:04 PM

If you go slow and use a slow speed (just fast enough to avoid burning), take multiple passes, use a push stick/shoe, and make sure you have external holding pressure (NOT from your hands) to keep the workpiece solidly against the fence and the table I would imagine you’ll be ok. That’s a big bit, but on the plus side at least it’s mass is oriented vertically rather than horizontally (like some very scary panel-raising bits). Be careful, and good luck!

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4037 posts in 1819 days


#8 posted 02-05-2015 07:13 PM

I have a large yonico crown molding bit, I have a 2×6×6’ piece of lumber with a few knots but pretty good

I wouldn’t run anything w/ knots through it.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

1610 posts in 3338 days


#9 posted 02-05-2015 07:18 PM

I agree, knots , especially pine , can be loose and dangerous, also they can do a lot of damage to your cutter ter. But the key to using this bit, is “sneak up on it ” do very light passes, don’t get overly aggressive and make damn sure you understand bit rotation, or it can get pulled out of your hand and go like a rocket , Some feather boards and push sticks are definitely in order,

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

800 posts in 1576 days


#10 posted 02-05-2015 07:20 PM


I wouldn t run anything w/ knots through it.

- bondogaposis

I overlooked that part – the knots do make this a scarier proposition…

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1176 posts in 2535 days


#11 posted 02-05-2015 07:28 PM

Can you do us a favor and post a picture of the profile and that might provide more information on how to do it. I highly reccomend Grippr’s I have two and use them heavily! They are great for the TS, and especially for the Router table. They are not cheap, but they are so versatile. Use one over the wood to keep it directly against the bit, and the second can be put behind and them move the front one to the back and repeat steps. They keep your hands nicely away from the spinning end of the bit. Also, going to slow on your feed rate is just as bad as going too fast.

http://www.carbideprocessors.com/grr-ripper-the-original-3d-push-block-system-micro-jig-gr-100/?gclid=CjwKEAiAxsymBRCegqiLzI7Q1S8SJADOgQrzIVTht7dPK76txOhIZF1aYB2kw-rlxx-B4X9faJ0u3BoC6-_w_wcB

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View dawsonbob's profile

dawsonbob

1923 posts in 1223 days


#12 posted 02-05-2015 07:35 PM

Clear pine is fine pine. Listen to what others have said and avoid knots on the router table. I’ve tried it, and the results were not good. Not good at all.

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

View MrBigHug's profile

MrBigHug

16 posts in 736 days


#13 posted 02-05-2015 07:35 PM

I am a super cautious person, I always choose saftey over speed or impatients. So I have taken all of your advice to heart. I will make sure everything that can possibly be done to prevent harm will be done before I attempt a practice run. So again thanks to everyone who has contributed.

View ADHDan's profile

ADHDan

800 posts in 1576 days


#14 posted 02-05-2015 08:29 PM



I am a super cautious person, I always choose saftey over speed or impatients. So I have taken all of your advice to heart. I will make sure everything that can possibly be done to prevent harm will be done before I attempt a practice run. So again thanks to everyone who has contributed.

- MrBigHug

Dude, while technically the “right” thing to do this is way too anticlimactic. I was kind of hoping this story would end with a GoPro video of a violent explosion and a jump cut to static.

-- Dan in Minneapolis, woodworking since 11/11.

View dawsonbob's profile

dawsonbob

1923 posts in 1223 days


#15 posted 02-05-2015 08:40 PM


Dude, while technically the “right” thing to do this is way too anticlimactic. I was kind of hoping this story would end with a GoPro video of a violent explosion and a jump cut to static.

- ADHDan

Lol!

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

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