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Forum topic by CharlesNeil posted 02-04-2015 10:13 PM 1968 views 1 time favorited 74 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CharlesNeil

1610 posts in 3333 days


02-04-2015 10:13 PM

I get a a lot of emails from beginning woodworkers, dealing with both woodworking and finishing.

I am just curious as to what you see as the major obstacles for Folks just getting into woodworking .


74 replies so far

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ScottKaye

471 posts in 1415 days


#1 posted 02-04-2015 10:40 PM

Charles,

Since I still consider myself a newbie.. I feel I can answer this question. For me the biggest obstacle is and continues to be a lack of tools! There is always an upgrade that I need and never enough funds to acquire it!

Dean

-- "Nothing happens until you build it"

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ScottKaye

471 posts in 1415 days


#2 posted 02-04-2015 10:40 PM

double post

-- "Nothing happens until you build it"

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Bill White

4450 posts in 3423 days


#3 posted 02-04-2015 10:50 PM

Charles, good to see this question.
1. Sharp tooling.
2. Accurate machine setting.
3. Willingness to practice and accept advice from others.
4. Quality equipment that won’t leave the “newbie” frustrated with the whole concept of woodworking.
5. Acceptance that the project is as good as the finish. This is within the realm of good construction.
6. Crappy input equals crappy output.
7. One must not forget that really good stuff was built with a good saw, a good chisel, and a good plane.

The old masters did not measure to the goofy decimal point. Go figure.

Don’t want to sound like an elitist, but, “income equals outgo”.
You’re concern is always valued. Don’t quit your contribution, questions, and advice.

-- bill@magraphics.us

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Richard

1898 posts in 2153 days


#4 posted 02-04-2015 10:55 PM

For a lot of people it is a lack of somepace to learn the basics. I mean I can learn a lot from watching Videos and reading books but for me it just sinks in better if it is Hands On Learning. And for a lot of the younger kids going thru School now there are no Woodworking or other Shop Classes at all so they have to learn it from Family or Friends or go to some other kind of School after they finish High School .I am very glad that I had both kinds of training as a kid from my Dad and Grandfather and also my Shop Teachers at school. Not that I am an Expert by any means but I can use almost any woodworkig tool out there and get a fairly good result .
Except the Lathe , they Scare me .

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gfadvm

14940 posts in 2152 days


#5 posted 02-05-2015 01:04 AM

Most of the young guys who come visit my shop are amazed at the amount of time I spend setting up for cuts. They want to just “get on with it” and then wonder why their parts don’t fit together perfectly! Patience is probably an old man’s game.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Rick Bailey

247 posts in 824 days


#6 posted 02-05-2015 01:20 AM

Well, lack of experience.

Maybe no wood shop in school, never worked in the trades.
But I think they just are getting a late start in woodworking.

I been in the trades for over 30 years and sometimes I still feel like a newbie but that’s why I love it, I’m still learning
all the time.
It’s fun.

And I love it when someone starting out ask me a question.

Just my 2cents.

-- I'll bulid your dream,you tear it down.

View Drew's profile

Drew

304 posts in 2562 days


#7 posted 02-05-2015 01:41 AM

Not having the right tool for the job… kinda.
To many beginners /think/ they need a bunch of tools. “I could make that, if I only had X tool”.
I also think people don’t know what to make either.

Sanding! No one wants to put in the time to properly sand, or even know what properly sanded truly is.

-- TruCraftFurniture.com

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

7700 posts in 2305 days


#8 posted 02-05-2015 01:41 AM

It depends on orientation, training, and how much money you have available. If you watch Charles Neil, and Norm Abrams, or Marc S. The wood whisperer, you get a mindset that power tools are the way to go. If you watch Paul Sellers, and Rob Cosman then it’s a hand tool orientation.

We can get old tools to rehab, but how do we rehab them?

Woodworking as a hobby is much more expensive than painting with oils and acrylics.

It is more expensive than photography.

Also space requirements and time can also be issues. And the cost of hardwood?

The schools have cut the budgets and manual arts are seen as something you now get after school, Like the College of Redwoods, Charles Neil’s hands on workshops, or Marc Adams School.

I would add this to the previous comments.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Sandra's profile

Sandra

6983 posts in 1537 days


#9 posted 02-05-2015 01:52 AM

Hmmm, I guess I can only speak for myself, but here were some of my obstacles. I suppose they could be applied to woodworking or anything else.

1. The fear of looking like an idiot.
2. The desire to know the ‘right’ way to do something only to find out that there are 27 ‘right’ ways.
3. The frustrating gap between reading, watching and doing.
4. The realization that there may be more to this whole woodworking thing than meets the eye.

Great question, by the way.

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.

View NoThanks's profile

NoThanks

798 posts in 991 days


#10 posted 02-05-2015 01:54 AM

Too much information online.
Ask a question (in a forum) and you get a bunch of different answers. Some good, Some real bad.
Not having the knowledge to separate the two.
Doesn’t matter if it’s a tool or a way to do something.

-- Because I'm gone, that's why!

View Rick Bailey's profile

Rick Bailey

247 posts in 824 days


#11 posted 02-05-2015 01:59 AM

+ 1 what Doc said.
You speek much gooder than me.;-)

-- I'll bulid your dream,you tear it down.

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upinflames

209 posts in 1624 days


#12 posted 02-05-2015 02:28 AM

I agree with Iwud4u, The biggest majority want the “newbie” to think it’s rocket science, here’s a big reality check, it’s not!

“You have to buy the best, you can’t make it without the best, most expensive tool there is”, again that is hogwash.

When most here realize the tool does not make the craftsman and not make them feel inferior because they bought a cheap tool.

When folks realize finishing is not rocket science and you don’t have to pre-treat the tree before you cut it down and make lumber so it will stain better, that too is hogwash.

I’ve been in business for over 30 years, learn something new everyday, the minute someone thinks they know it all, they will hurt somebody.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4167 posts in 3204 days


#13 posted 02-05-2015 02:33 AM

I think finishing is the big thing.

People mentally “Get” joinery, and understand if they cut things sloppy and need practice. They can watch You tube for and go to sites for Machinery tune-up articles, and take classes.

However with Dyes Stains Toners Sealers Sanding Sealer, Low VOC, Non Yellowing, Pre-cat/Post Cat/CAB/Nitrocelluolose lacquer… oils waxes -
ANd everyone favorite Minwax Polyshades…. polyurethane+stain all in one wipe!

Finishing can seem overwhelming with the mountain of choices.

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

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MinnesotaMarty

82 posts in 680 days


#14 posted 02-05-2015 02:36 AM

I started woodworking when I was about 10 years old and I am 61 years old now. My father was a carpenter and my mother bought me a real nice hand saw for Christmas. Luckily, my dad took two days between Christmas and New Years and spent time with me to teach me how to use that hand saw. We built two sawhorses. All hand cut by a 10 year old boy motivated to learn. they were nailed in parts and screwed together in parts. If your a newbie a real newbie, start with something like sawhorses. There are plenty of sawhorses on Youtube that can be replicated. Plus, then you’ll have something that you can use to put a pc. of plywood on and make a cutting/assembly table.
Youtube is fantastic to learn stuff, you just have to find the right presenter. The Wood Whisperer or Mathias Wandel is not for newbie’s. Remember you have to crawl before you can walk and you have to walk before you can run. hell – I am just starting to walk in my woodworking, and I have been at it for 50+ years. So, start with something small and who cares if you screw it up. Nobody is going to know but you. Fear of failure is worse than not even trying.
Also, find a mentor if you can. Most good woodworkers are more than willing to share and help.
I still have the saw but I don’t know where the sawhorses disappeared?

-- I can see the cheese heads from here and it is great.

View Rick Bailey's profile

Rick Bailey

247 posts in 824 days


#15 posted 02-05-2015 02:38 AM



I agree with Iwud4u, The biggest majority want the “newbie” to think it s rocket science, here s a big reality check, it s not! “You have to buy the best, you can t make it without the best, most expensive tool there is”, again that is hogwash. When most here realize the tool does not make the craftsman and not make them feel inferior because they bought a cheap tool. When folks realize finishing is not rocket science and you don t have to pre-treat the tree before you cut it down and make lumber so it will stain better, that too is hogwash. I ve been in business for over 30 years, learn something new everyday, the minute someone thinks they know it all, they will hurt somebody.

- upinflames


Hmm,
One old fart to another ;-) can you expand on the pre-treat the tree before cutting it down?
I have never heard of that.
Thanks,
Rick

-- I'll bulid your dream,you tear it down.

showing 1 through 15 of 74 replies

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