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Forum topic by SuperCubber posted 02-04-2015 04:26 AM 2101 views 1 time favorited 33 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SuperCubber

868 posts in 1747 days


02-04-2015 04:26 AM

Topic tags/keywords: led light shop light shop lighting lighting

Just thought I would throw this out there if anyone is looking for some new shop lights.

Costco has a Feit 3700 lumen LED shop light on sale right now for $31.99. It has 4.5 stars on Amazon. It includes the LEDs. I bought one today and it added a tremendous amount of light to my poorly lit garage. I may add a couple more!

One thing to note is that this is a plug-in type light, so it would have to be on a switched socket, or a remotely controlled socket.

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine


33 replies so far

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

2667 posts in 2647 days


#1 posted 02-04-2015 05:58 AM

How does it compare in brightness to a 2x T8 fixture?

-- Allen, Colorado

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SuperCubber

868 posts in 1747 days


#2 posted 02-04-2015 12:16 PM

I didn’t replace a T8, so I can’t speak from experience, but based on lumen output, it’s about 30% more. A 32-watt T8 puts out 2850 lumens.

Although, that could be per bulb; in which case, the T8 would be brighter.

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

1950 posts in 1452 days


#3 posted 02-04-2015 12:40 PM

I found a T8 bulb that was 2800 lumens per bulb and $2.50. The rated life is about 24,000 versus 50,000 hours for LED.

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2410 posts in 1977 days


#4 posted 02-04-2015 12:47 PM

The only thing is this is rated at 4100 Kelvin, which is a cool white, or bright white. I have over my benches where I do my staining and coloring fluorescents with daylight bulbs, which are above 5000 K. I learned the hard way years ago to always use daylight bulbs for proper coloring.
They might be good for other parts of my shop, though. I get sick of replacing fluorescent bulbs.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

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altendky

169 posts in 1673 days


#5 posted 02-04-2015 12:57 PM

I believe the 2850 lumen of a ‘standard’ T8 is per bulb so the LED is less. My calculations have put the efficiency in the back seat as it’s only a 10% or so improvement. The instant on, no flickering, and improved life are the value. If limiting yourself to this option then the color temp may be a significant issue though. Note that most personal shops are not going to get the rated life out of a flourescent bulb because they are intended to be turned on and left that way more or less. Also, I wouldn’t be getting LED bulb’s except that I get them at Costco where I can have the store honor the warranty effectively (not looking to abuse, I’ve only returned two or three items in 10 years). Even if the 22 year rated bulbs I’ve gotten so far only last 10, odds are by then there will be something niftier anyways.

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SuperCubber

868 posts in 1747 days


#6 posted 02-04-2015 01:00 PM

They are definitely very white, but for general lighting, it was a good enough deal for me!

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

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tsdahc

107 posts in 1814 days


#7 posted 02-04-2015 01:40 PM

I have so far installed 4 of these in my shop, I like them. Some advantages is they are bright, they are light and if you drop them they dont shatter (bulbs are plastic). Also Costco has the best return policy so if they die, they go back and Im not out any money but so far I have not had any issues. They are not daylight as stated above but I have 6 LED can lights in the same area that are daylight (what can I say I like a bright shop after working in my previous dungeon shop). I find I like the mixture of 5000K can lights and the 4100K shop lights. As far as compared to a regular T8, I didn’t notice much difference in how bright the light is, only notable difference was in color. One thing to note on the difference between LED T8 style lights compared to regular T8 bulbs, LED are directional where as regular T8 throws lights 360 degrees. A LED can be less lumen and still give you more light as it is directed down where as a regular T8 has to rely on a reflector to take light and redirect it down. Im happy with them. When I complete my shop I will have 14 LED Daylight can lights, 6 LED shop lights on the ceiling and 2 LED shop lights under cabinets. The real advantage for me is heat savings and power draw. My can lights are 1100 lumens each 75 watt replacements, if your looking for a bright bulb you cant beat G7 Power LED light bulbs their 4000K BR30 bulb is 1175 lumens 13 watts and the 5000k bulb is 1100 13 watts. If I would have went with incandescent and fluorescent my total lighting wattage would have been 1658 watts, with the LED I am running at 450 watts.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7211 posts in 2839 days


#8 posted 02-04-2015 03:24 PM

Any idea how these do below 32°F…. near 0°F? My fluorescents drop about 75% of the output when it gets really cold.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View BigMig's profile

BigMig

385 posts in 2076 days


#9 posted 02-04-2015 03:31 PM

Sorry for an additional question

but If I’m using 4’ fluorescent shop light fixtures, isn’t that light also not perfect daylight? What temp are they and would the LEDs be an upgrade? Or would I still be off when looking for subtle color effects?

Thanks all !

-- Mike from Lansdowne, PA

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

19178 posts in 2138 days


#10 posted 02-04-2015 03:58 PM

Mike,
Fluorescent bulbs come in a range of color temps….

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View Lucasd2002's profile

Lucasd2002

124 posts in 815 days


#11 posted 02-04-2015 04:09 PM

Almost makes me want to join costco. For those that installed these, my understanding is that they come with a cord and plug… is that correct?

Did you hard-wire them in your shop or just plug them in?

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2410 posts in 1977 days


#12 posted 02-04-2015 05:17 PM

Mike, I used to buy whatever fluorescent was the cheapest, then I started looking at how my work looked different when I took pictures for the new owners, usually outside. Then I started looking for daylight bulbs, and it changed things quite a bit. I have some LED’s in my house, and overall I find them to be a little bluer than daylight bulbs. You can buy daylight LED’s now, but they are expensive.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View JayT's profile

JayT

4778 posts in 1674 days


#13 posted 02-04-2015 05:23 PM



Sorry for an additional question

but If I m using 4 fluorescent shop light fixtures, isn t that light also not perfect daylight? What temp are they and would the LEDs be an upgrade? Or would I still be off when looking for subtle color effects?

Thanks all !

- BigMig

Light bulb temps cover the range and are measured in degrees Kelvin.

2800-3000K Soft white. Very yellow, but easy on the eyes. Best for reading lamps and general household lighting where you will be for long periods.

3500K-4100K Cool white. 3500K will seem to have a pinkish tone, while 4100K is a bit blue. Best for office and work lighting that doesn’t involve color precision. A bit harsher on the eyes than soft white, but offers the perception of more light output for the same energy level. Most fluorescent will be in this range.

If you want to see what it does to color, take something that has some red tones from outside to 4100K fluorescent and the visual appearance will change drastically. Since brown usually contains quite a bit of red tones, this temp is not a good choice for a finishing room, but would work well for over a workbench.

5000K and up. Daylight. Much harsher on the eyes, but gives a more accurate color rendering similar to sunlight. If you want to be as close as possible to true sunlight, look at 6500K color corrected bulbs, such as those used in color chip displays at paint stores.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4169 posts in 3205 days


#14 posted 02-04-2015 06:08 PM

If you are wanting good color rendering…. look at the CRI on the package that is the “COLOR RENDERING INDEX”.
And T8 and T12 wit the same basic name on the label are different from each other.

100 is ‘pefect’. so look at the CRI number as a ’% of Standard’ the higher the better and nothing exceeds 100.

The T12 lamps today, have CRI that is UNIVERSALLY higher than the T8 (except some specialty museum and aquarium lamps)

Most LED and Fluorescent lamps today are around 82

Many have compared “cool white” halophosphor lamps with a CRI of 59, and then purchased 5000K lamps with a 90 CRI.
That is driven by the phosphor used inside the lamp, and not what the color of the light is.

If you go to the BORG…. the T12 lamps are all 88-93 CRI.
The old Cool White has been outlawed. So you now see “Cool White Supreme”
T8’s are all in the 80’s
The numbering for e.g. “841” is the first number ‘8’ is that the CRI is in the 80’s and the 41 is 4100.

835 is 3500K and 85 CRI
850 is 5000K and 82 CRI.

The T8 Daylight – - 6500K has only a 76 CRI.
So as you go bluer the Color rendering gets worse.
Daylight CRI stinks because the Department of Energy wanted the Light Output to be 2% brighter, so the Color Rendering was sacrificed for output.

That approach is ‘industry standard’

-- 'Political correctness is fascism pretending to be manners' ~George Carlin

View SuperCubber's profile

SuperCubber

868 posts in 1747 days


#15 posted 02-04-2015 06:49 PM



I have so far installed 4 of these in my shop, I like them. Some advantages is they are bright, they are light and if you drop them they dont shatter (bulbs are plastic). Also Costco has the best return policy so if they die, they go back and Im not out any money but so far I have not had any issues. They are not daylight as stated above but I have 6 LED can lights in the same area that are daylight (what can I say I like a bright shop after working in my previous dungeon shop). I find I like the mixture of 5000K can lights and the 4100K shop lights. As far as compared to a regular T8, I didn t notice much difference in how bright the light is, only notable difference was in color. One thing to note on the difference between LED T8 style lights compared to regular T8 bulbs, LED are directional where as regular T8 throws lights 360 degrees. A LED can be less lumen and still give you more light as it is directed down where as a regular T8 has to rely on a reflector to take light and redirect it down. Im happy with them. When I complete my shop I will have 14 LED Daylight can lights, 6 LED shop lights on the ceiling and 2 LED shop lights under cabinets. The real advantage for me is heat savings and power draw. My can lights are 1100 lumens each 75 watt replacements, if your looking for a bright bulb you cant beat G7 Power LED light bulbs their 4000K BR30 bulb is 1175 lumens 13 watts and the 5000k bulb is 1100 13 watts. If I would have went with incandescent and fluorescent my total lighting wattage would have been 1658 watts, with the LED I am running at 450 watts.

- tsdahc

Very good point. I had forgotten about that little nugget of information!

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

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