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Mallet for my new sweatheart chisels

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Forum topic by Chris posted 02-04-2015 02:35 AM 1522 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Chris

68 posts in 838 days


02-04-2015 02:35 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question look for help need advice make me a mallete please

I am starting to collect the 750 sweetheart chisels. I figure at $35-$40 each, i can buy one here, one there, one for father day and finally get a decent “suite” of hand tools.

I am sure that I don’t want to use an old framing hammer for this and am looking at either the round type of a turned mallet.

or this square looking one

Question is i hear the round give you more control so am interested in that. But I do not own anything to turn something like that one so wondering if anyone has any ideas past going out a buys some new tools. I am working on starting a bit of workshop so trying to save up for the important things like a jointer, planer or drill press before a lathe and stuff.

Any thoughts on which one is a better for a begineer and ideas on how to make them could be greatly appreciated.

Thanks for understanding that while really interested in this and have some experience, i am not in the best shape with machinery for the woodshop

your total noob woodworking friend

Chris J

-- designer by education, wood working hack by choice


17 replies so far

View nashley's profile

nashley

46 posts in 744 days


#1 posted 02-04-2015 03:36 AM

I’ve never used either of those mallets but I do have a few of the sweetheart chisels and I use the mallet pictured above. I bought it at harbor freight for a few dollars and it has worked great. I mainly use the yellow side which is a harder plastic whereas the black side is a slightly softer rubber. It’s heavy enough to do mortice work yet light enough to use all day.

-- Nathan

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ElChe

630 posts in 802 days


#2 posted 02-04-2015 05:31 AM

I like paring (with grain) with a round mallet like the first one and I like chopping (across grain) with a rectangular mallet like the second one. The round one I have is a green urethane one and it works fine. I like the weight. The second one is a somewhat unwieldy Crown mallet. I am planning on making a smaller squarish mallet from heavy wood or with brass rods pinned through the mallet head to add heft.

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

2673 posts in 2650 days


#3 posted 02-04-2015 05:53 AM

I have the round urethane “wood is good” mallet (their smallest size), and it works great for most every chiseling task. I just made an even-smaller mallet this evening from russian olive, we’ll see how it works once the finish dries.

-- Allen, Colorado

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Andre

1023 posts in 1272 days


#4 posted 02-04-2015 06:47 AM

Good luck with the 750 sweet hearts, I just picked up a 1/8” in new condition $100.00.
I usually use a round brass one from Lee Valley, only light taps would never use them
for a mortise, got some old beaters and a full set of Narex for that!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View jtm's profile

jtm

218 posts in 1102 days


#5 posted 02-04-2015 07:23 AM



Good luck with the 750 sweet hearts, I just picked up a 1/8” in new condition $100.00.
I usually use a round brass one from Lee Valley, only light taps would never use them
for a mortise, got some old beaters and a full set of Narex for that!

- rad457

Am I missing something?

Isn’t a 1/8” Stanley 750 less than $30 new?

View Chris 's profile

Chris

68 posts in 838 days


#6 posted 02-04-2015 01:52 PM

Jtm. I’m in Canada and everything is more expensive here. It was actually 33.50.

Thanks for the comments. I’m thinking of getting the lee valley now with the brass head or maybe one with the rubber coating

-- designer by education, wood working hack by choice

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

13738 posts in 2084 days


#7 posted 02-04-2015 02:09 PM

Chris, I think you’ll quickly get used to either style. Weight and balance is a bigger deal. Suggest you make a simple (square) mallet and see how you like it in that regard. Easy to do, lots of examples here on LJs (search Mallet Seap).

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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Andre

1023 posts in 1272 days


#8 posted 02-04-2015 10:56 PM

Am I missing something?

Isn t a 1/8” Stanley 750 less than $30 new?

- jtm

The new Stanley Sweet Hearts maybe, but a new / vintage 1/8” 750 ?
I have the new ones but started to collect the old 750’s

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View PatrickH's profile

PatrickH

51 posts in 1353 days


#9 posted 02-08-2015 05:25 PM

What are the handles of the Sweethearts made of? Hornbeam can take quite a beating. I want happy with my current mallet, so I ordered the large journeyman mallet from Lee Valley. Hard to be at $30. It should arrive tomorrow, so I’ll let you know how I like it. Might write a blog review.

-- http://bloodsweatsawdust.com

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ElChe

630 posts in 802 days


#10 posted 02-08-2015 09:03 PM

I went to the Port Townsend woodworking school for a haircut dovetail class. Great experience. They use Back Channel mallets (smaller ones) and I really liked the size and heft. I may get one because my mallet making plans are on hold as I have too many projects in various stages of disarray. DiLegno sells them.

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

View ElChe's profile

ElChe

630 posts in 802 days


#11 posted 02-08-2015 10:59 PM

Haircut. Haircut!!! Hand cut.

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

View Chris 's profile

Chris

68 posts in 838 days


#12 posted 02-09-2015 12:47 AM

ohhh i like those. thanks!

-- designer by education, wood working hack by choice

View Tedstor's profile

Tedstor

1625 posts in 2098 days


#13 posted 02-09-2015 03:06 AM

I have a few mallets. My favorite is actually a maple “potato masher” that I found in an antique shop for $5.

View pmayer's profile

pmayer

864 posts in 2531 days


#14 posted 02-09-2015 04:00 AM

If you want to make a round mallet but don’t have a lathe, how about making one like this with a domed head? Domed head one one side gives you a nice forgiving strike surface, while the squared surface on the other can get into corners.

-- PaulMayer, http://www.vernswoodgoods.com

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1775 days


#15 posted 02-09-2015 10:03 AM

I like the round type because it gives me lots of exercise bending over to pick it up off the floor every time it rolls of the bench.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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