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Forum topic by Douglas Bordner posted 04-18-2009 07:37 PM 1258 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Douglas Bordner

4012 posts in 3527 days


04-18-2009 07:37 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Hinges. It’s all about the hinges. As many of you know, I’m pretty much consumed with box-mania in my woodworking pursuits. Paying out the nose for superior quality Brusso hinges is always an option, and one I can readily adopt for the occasional special gift, or something commissioned. But these (at around $20-$25 a pair) are a budget-breaker for the vast number of boxes aborning in my imagination. I really favor a stopped hinge for small box work. I am not especially fond of the majority of of the brass-plated small stopped piano hinges available.

My specific question is this: could a person use drop-leaf or butler’s tray hinges on a box. They would probably have to be let in to the underside of the lid (maybe even surface mounted) and to the back of the box body. Have any of you done so? I’m not talking huge boxes here. Generally 12˝ wide by 8˝ deep or there about (or whatever Φ derivative works), and stock thickness wouldn’t be more than 5/8” at the beefiest. What are you thoughts?

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.


10 replies so far

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16242 posts in 3681 days


#1 posted 04-18-2009 09:23 PM

What are you asking us for? I think you are the perfect man to try it out and let us all know how it works out. :-)

Seriously, I’m a visual, hands-on thinker. Without holding the hinges in one hand and the box in the other, I don’t have a clue how it would work.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View TheCaver's profile

TheCaver

288 posts in 3302 days


#2 posted 04-18-2009 09:41 PM

I agree, there is not a lot in between the $20 Brussos and $2 Lowes butt hinges. I just saw these at $5 a pair though:

http://www.horton-brasses.com/store/clock/clockboxhinges

And I’ve been considering this technique to see how well it works:

Check near the bottom of the page where they show a recessed butt hinge and chamfered back….interesting..
http://www.whitechapel-ltd.com/tech/box_hinges.shtml

Let us know what you find!

JC

-- Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known. -Carl Sagan

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

4012 posts in 3527 days


#3 posted 04-18-2009 10:19 PM

Charlie, I’m just too damn cheap to spend on ‘em and find out it blows. Thought I’d let you take the plunge :D

I’m on the same precise page with you on the visual/spatial conception continuum.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3809 posts in 3484 days


#4 posted 04-18-2009 10:33 PM

I’m way over my head here as far as hands on experinece is concerned with these mini hinges as I am installing my second set. ( this time they are Brusso) <g>

I’ve been around manufacturiing too much during my adult life so I have to ask the question?
If these “butt” hinges are indeed CNC produced, ( i’m not certian but pretty sure) then there should be some econony of scale at this point.
Brusso has a unique market with the quality they offer but it is not outside the scope or hundreds of CNC shops who must be experiencing some slowdowns right about now.
I would not be surprised to see one or more players enter this mini market in the not too distant future.
Reducing the unit cost should encourage more users.
As it stands now Doug said it when he mentioned having to use Brusso’s sparingly.

What are your thoughts on this?

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3809 posts in 3484 days


#5 posted 04-18-2009 10:52 PM

Why do you say that?

Do you have any specific reasons or are you just playing the ponies?

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3809 posts in 3484 days


#6 posted 04-19-2009 12:06 AM

I’m not trying to quarell with you about this either. Your opinion if fine with me.
I do wonder how many CNC machines and laser cutters that have been booked rather continously for several years will now find themselves with 10 -15 hours a week and no bookings?
I also expect some slack time in the shops of traditional hinge makers already familiar with the process and somewhat anxious to keep their doors open.

Regards
Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

4012 posts in 3527 days


#7 posted 04-19-2009 04:29 AM

TC that Whitechapel technique looks as promising as those Horton’s nickel/steel hinges, and I am already familiar with the chamfer stop when using the 5mm mini-barrels. Hmmm.Thanks for the notion.
Any other explorers?

Anyone here with experience fitting the home-made Incra wooden hinges? I made a set but have never used them.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6819 posts in 3442 days


#8 posted 04-19-2009 05:29 PM

Hi Doug;

I have to agree with Charlie M, at least as far as seeing the options, and the box. And I would probably agree with what you said;

”I’m on the same precise page with you on the visual/spatial conception continuum”.

But, I have no idea what that means. LOL

I would also agree with Bob2, about a small niche market being available for a shop with an idle CNC Machine.

If it’s a big enough market for Horton Brass to make expensive ones, which obviously it is, than the economy of scale would make it profitable for other’s to enter the market.

A lesson taught at Wharton Business School, as an option to consider when setting prices, was to keep the price low enough on a product to prevent it from becoming worthwhile for competition to bother trying to compete with an already established brand.

I don’t think Horton Brass has followed this option, in setting their price, so the market is ripe for others to enter. Many of us hesitate to spend $25.00 for a pair of hinges, but would we spend $15.00?

I imagine this lower price would almost double the sales figures.

Just another opinion.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Julian's profile

Julian

880 posts in 2988 days


#9 posted 04-20-2009 03:34 PM

I have refused to pay the big bucks for brusso in the past. Next time I need hinges for a small project, I’m going to try my hand at wooden hinges.

-- Julian, Park Forest, IL

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

4012 posts in 3527 days


#10 posted 04-21-2009 06:15 AM

Any other thoughts, or folks who have used the Incra home-made wooden hinges?

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

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