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Evening out the inlay

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Forum topic by Bovine posted 04-18-2009 05:32 AM 909 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bovine

114 posts in 2792 days


04-18-2009 05:32 AM

Related to my previous post on the jewelry box I’m making…..
On the sides of the box, I’m putting in a simple inlay. I’ve cut a 3/4” groove in the sides and I’ve glued in a strip down the center of the sides. I like the looks of contrasting wood. Anyway, the inlay strip is raised up about 1/8” or so.

This is another case of “what’s next”? How do I even it out? I thought about sanding it down but I’m worried that’ll show on the rest of the sides. I thought about sending that side through my thickness planer, but not sure if it will mess up the glue holding it in the slot. Any suggestions?

I’m pretty new at all of this and as you can tell, this little box is teaching me a lot.

-- Kansas City, KS "Nothing is as permanent as a temporary solution"


8 replies so far

View Gary's profile

Gary

8968 posts in 2897 days


#1 posted 04-18-2009 05:34 AM

If your glue is dry, the planer wont bother it. But, how are you sanding? Are you using a ROS?

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

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Bovine

114 posts in 2792 days


#2 posted 04-18-2009 05:36 AM

I’m using a ROS and probably use 60, then 120, then 220

-- Kansas City, KS "Nothing is as permanent as a temporary solution"

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Gary

8968 posts in 2897 days


#3 posted 04-18-2009 05:40 AM

The planer will work if you glue is 24hrs old. But, try to remember what Karson told you about cutting thick. Did you plan the piece down to final size before you put the contrasting wood in or did you leave it a little high?

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

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Bovine

114 posts in 2792 days


#4 posted 04-18-2009 05:43 AM

That’s good advice. No, my wood is 3/4: and I want it 1/2 so I still need to resaw it down. The inlay piece is thick too. Sounds like when my glue dries tomorrow I’ll resaw the board’s backside then send both sides through the planer to finish it off.

-- Kansas City, KS "Nothing is as permanent as a temporary solution"

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CharlieM1958

16242 posts in 3682 days


#5 posted 04-18-2009 03:10 PM

Are you saying you have not cut the sides yet….they are still one long board? Because if the sides are already cut, aren’t the pieces too short to run through the planer?

For the record, I sand in this situation. If the inlay sits considerably higher than the surrounding surface, I start of on the stationary belt sander, then switch to the ROS when it gets close.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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Julian

880 posts in 2989 days


#6 posted 04-18-2009 03:29 PM

I’m with Charlie on this one. Use a stationary of hand held belt sander first, then switch to a ROS.

-- Julian, Park Forest, IL

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i82much

25 posts in 2850 days


#7 posted 04-18-2009 06:13 PM

What I do is take a block plane and get most of the inlay down first…then run it through the planer taking VERY light cuts to get it flush

-- At the end of my life...When I meet my Maker...Will I be seen as...a giver or a taker

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Bovine

114 posts in 2792 days


#8 posted 04-19-2009 03:18 AM

Thank you everyone, I tackled this one today. I’d left 1/4 inch over on the thickness of the board. Once the glue had dried on the inlay, I sent it through the thickness planer on the inlay side a couple of times taking just a bit off each time…maybe 1/32.

After that, I flipped it over and thinned it the rest of the way. I have to say it turned out a lot nicer than I had expected. I’ll post pictures when it’s all done. THANK YOU everyone for the advice.

-- Kansas City, KS "Nothing is as permanent as a temporary solution"

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