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Forum topic by Damian Penney posted 08-04-2007 05:23 PM 1288 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Damian Penney

1140 posts in 2648 days


08-04-2007 05:23 PM

Topic tags/keywords: scms station workshop

So starting to think about how to re-org my shop (it’s an inefficient mess) but not sure how to proceed with locating my SCMS because it extends so far back. What solutions did you guys come up with?

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso


13 replies so far

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2818 days


#1 posted 08-04-2007 05:26 PM

Ok, I will bite, what is a SCMS?

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

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WayneC

12290 posts in 2754 days


#2 posted 08-04-2007 05:43 PM

Sliding Compound Miter Saw

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2818 days


#3 posted 08-04-2007 05:47 PM

Ahh, ok. Well how about putting the saw on its own table. We have all seen those miter saw tables that the big box stores carry. I think you could make one to house your miter saw. You could even make drawers and shelving underneath to store it when not in use. Then you could re-use the table for something else, like an assembly table. Another idea would be to add a router base in there too, then you would have a router table as well. Two items for the same space. Put the whole thing on wheels and you can move it to where you need, and out of the way when done.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View Damian Penney's profile

Damian Penney

1140 posts in 2648 days


#4 posted 08-04-2007 06:06 PM

The thing with a table is that when the saw is slid all the way back it’s about 38” deep. This solution looks pretty good as it has a sliding shelf so you can pull it out when in use but then stow it.

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

View edp's profile

edp

109 posts in 2617 days


#5 posted 08-04-2007 10:03 PM

I use a colapsible stand I purchased from Sears (believe it or not) which is quite beefy. I believe they refer to it as a “Portable Work Station?” It has the parts required to mount your saw and a couple of substantial steel brackets from which you can create a shelf for the front. The work supports telegraph out on each side about 4’ and are easily adjusted for height. I keep it folded up until I need the SCMS. It just takes about 5 minutes to get everything up and running.

Ed

-- Come on in, the beer is cold and the wood is dry. www.crookedlittletree.com

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2817 days


#6 posted 08-04-2007 11:36 PM

we built a table that the saw fits down into, in the middle of the table.
We put it as close to the wall as possible. This gives us lots of work space on the front of the table but right now everything keeps going to the back of the table and I, being short of stature, find it difficult to access these resources as well as the plugs on the wall.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

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edp

109 posts in 2617 days


#7 posted 08-05-2007 01:34 AM

Since I had to go back out and finish a job that required the SCMS, I thought I would go ahead and post some pictures of the stand that I have been using. It is convenient for me both in the shop and on the jobsite.

Well, I guess I would if I could figure out how to do it.

Sorry for the false alarm.

Ed

-- Come on in, the beer is cold and the wood is dry. www.crookedlittletree.com

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6648 posts in 2636 days


#8 posted 08-05-2007 04:48 AM

Hi Damien;

Since we are always on jobsites, I designed and built a cabinet on wheels. It had two flaps hanging down when being moved,(to allow it to fit through doorways) but once we were where we were going to use it, we lifted the flaps, and locked the wheels. The flaps had a fence built into them that extended via sliding dovetails. The flaps were held up with telesopic legs. These fit into a verticle qrawer on the cabinet. The lower section held an air compressor and hose. The other drawers held a coping saw, assorted nail and brad guns, as well as a large selection of nails. And an extension cord.

When we would roll this into a room, no other tools were needed that weren’t on this cabinet. I saw a 30 % decrease in the amount of time it took to trim out a room, using this setup.

Since it was made out of Mahogany and birch plywood, with dovetailed drawers, clients were very imoressed with the fact we would go to that much trouble for a work station. It ended up generating cabinet work for us.

I’ll post the pictures when I find the unit!

The one in the shop is visable in the shop photos I posted, I believe.

The setup in the shop is permanently mounted to the table built for it. It is floating out from the aluminum wood rack members. This way it doesn’t interfere with lumber storage below it.
It has a light switch to turn on the power. If the switch is off, the saw won’t work. This way the user is forced to use the task lighting aimed at the blade, as well as the dedicated dust collector. All are turned on with one switch. That way they can’t forget to turn on the dust collector. A problem before. This setup works very well.

The cabinet photos you posted are nice, but I would have made a few changes. First, I would have used european feet on the cabinets. This makes leveling them a cinch. It also allows for a recessed toe kick, so you are not stubbing your toes every time you go to use the saw.

If this is a business for you. or may become one, use better lumber.(plywood) The reason is two fold. One it;s more stable, and more attractive. Two, if clients come into you shop, the impression they get will play a big part in whether or not you get the job.

When they see a well organizes shop, that’s clean,neat, and has signs of a quality tradesperson, half the battle is won. If it’s “mickey mouse” half the battle is lost.

Don’t take any of this the wrong way, it is intended to help. (been there. done that)

Lee

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

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oscorner

4564 posts in 2967 days


#9 posted 08-05-2007 04:57 AM

My solution was to buy a 12” CMS. I didn’t want to have to do what you are doing now.

-- Jesus is Lord!

View Damian Penney's profile

Damian Penney

1140 posts in 2648 days


#10 posted 08-10-2007 04:35 AM

Sorry I haven’t kept up with the replies here.. Busy!

Thanks for the pointers Lee, for me this will be just a hobby for the foreseeable future so I’m not too worried about anyone judging my shop cabinets but your point is well taken, first impressions count.

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

View dennis mitchell's profile

dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 2971 days


#11 posted 08-10-2007 05:11 AM

Damian, here is what we do for refrigerators that are too deep. We cut out the drywall and studs and box in a 4” deep recessed hole… If you feel like cutting a hole in the wall that is.

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Damian Penney

1140 posts in 2648 days


#12 posted 08-10-2007 05:55 PM

That’s a good idea Dennis, only problem is my shop is in the garage that has concrete walls.. Could get messy :)

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2678 days


#13 posted 08-12-2007 11:16 PM

Daimion, I built this plan from Shopnotes a few years back and it has severed me well both in the shop and on a couple of job sites.
The wings uncouple and fit inside the base for portability and the rig is only about 40 lbs.
for $6.00 they will let you down load the plan and that will save you a ton of time.

I am tracking a new Hitachi or ma kita CMS and if necessary , I will build the same box again.
Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

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