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So confused on what lumber to use for a patio cover

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Forum topic by pdxrealtor posted 01-31-2015 10:54 PM 1874 views 0 times favorited 33 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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pdxrealtor

104 posts in 689 days


01-31-2015 10:54 PM

I think I’ve reached the paralysis by over-analysis stage.

I’m going to build a patio cover. I was going to use an appearance grade PT wood for the posts and beam, a construction grade PT for the ledger board, and premium standard and better select douglas fir dimensional for the rafters.

Then I got to thinking nothing would match (I plan to do a clear or semi-transparent stain).

Now I’m wondering if I can use the premium standard and better select doug. fir on everything, and seal it before staining, or if I should move to the appearance grade PT lumber for everything.

Help please!

And on a side note…. what the hell is the official name for PT wood with the perforations, and the official name for the PT wood without the perforations? I can’t find it on google to save my life…... I’d like to read about the differences but without the official name I can’t do a google search that returns anything applicable to what I’m looking for.


33 replies so far

View josephf's profile

josephf

125 posts in 1561 days


#1 posted 01-31-2015 11:09 PM

this is probable a reginal thing . i have some advice though .i am in the trades and constantly get all confused with all the products and names . generally this info i can get from the lumber yard . i forget often ,just happens .i ,aynot work with a particular product for months or years and i just do not recall .
next -i dark stained a project awhile back just to get a match yet on one i am doing now i have two different stains on purpose .an exterior set of redwood stairs with some dark and some more natural stained moldings . anyhow a combination can really look nice .to much of one thing is just boring .
what ever you do you will love it .

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MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#2 posted 01-31-2015 11:18 PM

Are you talking about T1-11 Plywood?

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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pdxrealtor

104 posts in 689 days


#3 posted 01-31-2015 11:19 PM

^^ I’m talking about 2×4s and 4×4s only

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rustfever

716 posts in 2775 days


#4 posted 01-31-2015 11:29 PM

First, rot resistant or Pressure Treated lumber is necessary if it will be in contact with concrete. If your posts are to rest on concrete, try laying a short piece of Redwood [which is rot resistant] or PT material horizontally on the bottom of the post. If your posts are to be 4×4 [actually 3.5” x 3.5”] use another peice of redwood 2” x4” cut to 3.5” long and put it under the post. Predrill nails or, if you are using a ‘Simpson Post Anchor, simply set under the post before attaching to the anchor.

Next, use DF #1 for posts. #1 material is much better in appearance than is S & B grade and is usually much straighter and has fewer defects, knots, and is never 3 cornered as is S & B [Standard and Better]

Use the same lumber for ledgers and joist. If the joists and ledger are to be seen, then by all means use selected DF#1 for these items also.

No PT material will take a decent stain. It is also difficult to like the perforations of that type material even when painted.

-- Rustfever, Central California

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firefighterontheside

13487 posts in 1321 days


#5 posted 01-31-2015 11:40 PM

For my covered deck I used pt yellow pine for the last rafter at each end and for the beams that the rafters sit in. Everything else is #2 yellow pine regular. I think it looks fine that they don’t match. I don’t notice. For my posts I used eastern red cedar 5×5’s. I intend to paint the rafters some day.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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pdxrealtor

104 posts in 689 days


#6 posted 01-31-2015 11:42 PM

Thanks for that info.

I will be using the Simpson adjustable post anchors.

There is PT that does not have the perforations, but it is much more expensive than the doug. fir.

I just looked at the HD website and they only have #2 & Better Kiln-Dried Douglas Fir Lumber. No number 1.

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pdxrealtor

104 posts in 689 days


#7 posted 01-31-2015 11:49 PM

Thanks Firefighter…... home depot doesn’t have 5×5 material (at least on their website) or 4×6, 4×8, etc. Lowes seem to have all of those.

So I now that I know I can use the doug fir all around without issue, IF I treat and stain it.
OR
I could use a non-perforated PT lumber all around for a no-maintenance deal.

Does this sound correct?

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MrUnix

4230 posts in 1664 days


#8 posted 01-31-2015 11:51 PM

I’m confused.. perforated? I’ve built quite a few patio covers/roofs but have no clue as to what you mean by perforated lumber.. maybe it’s just the meds :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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pdxrealtor

104 posts in 689 days


#9 posted 01-31-2015 11:54 PM

^^ lol…. there in lies my problem. I have no idea what the ‘proper’ name for the different types of PT lumber are.

One type has tons of tiny perforations (look like staple holes) and another type have NO perforations and are much less of an eye sore.

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firefighterontheside

13487 posts in 1321 days


#10 posted 02-01-2015 12:03 AM

Yeah, I had the 5×5’s made at a local sawmill. It was just the right size and nice to look at.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View BurtC's profile

BurtC

101 posts in 2595 days


#11 posted 02-01-2015 12:36 AM

All is Western Red Cedar except the manufactured beams, which are Alaskan Yellow Cedar.
All joints are box joints (no metal brackets) and secored with lumber locks.

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pdxrealtor

104 posts in 689 days


#12 posted 02-01-2015 12:38 AM

^^ Very nice! What’s the length of that thing? What’s the size of the beam.

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BurtC

101 posts in 2595 days


#13 posted 02-01-2015 12:47 AM

It is 40’ long x 16’-12’ along home ledger. Beam is 16” x 6”.
Between the 12×2 rails are louvered type panels 4-5’ long, that rest on cleats.

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Buckethead

3140 posts in 1334 days


#14 posted 02-01-2015 01:09 AM

I’m confused. Is it an open arbor, or a roof with exposed rafters and roof decking?

If it’s an arbor where all the lumber will be exposed to weather, use PT, cedar, redwood, white oak or another rot resistant lumber. (I don’t believe Douglas fir is well suited to being exposed to weather.)

If it is a roof, then any wood you wish, with PT for the posts.

-- Support woodworking hand models. Buy me a sawstop.

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pdxrealtor

104 posts in 689 days


#15 posted 02-01-2015 01:11 AM

So… there is about a 75.00 difference between going with #2 or better kiln dried doug fir(cheaper) vs. going with #1 or better outdoor select pressure treated wood.

This brings up the question of sealing the doug fir. The exposed pieces, posts/beam/outer rafters/ledger board should be treated and stained. Might as well do the middle rafters if I’m doing all of the those other pieces, right?

Stain and sealer will add up very close to 75.00. Throw in the prep time and I have to ask, is it really worth it to go with the doug fir?

On top of that add in the maintenance of the sealed and stained doug fir over time vs. the almost no maintenance PT option.

Any input?

showing 1 through 15 of 33 replies

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