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Carving tools..Chisel, gouge sets

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Forum topic by MNbuzzdust posted 04-13-2009 06:04 AM 1917 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MNbuzzdust

99 posts in 2815 days


04-13-2009 06:04 AM

I am looking for a set of Carving tools to try some relief carving (small scale, boxes, plates, wall hangings). Can I get a decent set for under $100 or am I going to be frustrated with any of the cheap sets and want to quit quickly??
Please give me an opinion on these sets also ??

http://grizzly.com/products/12-pc-Carving-Chisel-Set/H2930

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&item=330321604672


10 replies so far

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

17669 posts in 3139 days


#1 posted 04-13-2009 06:16 AM

Most chisels are made of good hardened tool steel any more, except maybe the cheapest junk from the Orient. As Thomas MacDonald said in his sharpening video, a cheap chisel from the big box store is just a good as a $100 chisel if it is properly sharpened. I have a small cheap set from the 1970’s i have used to carve several rifle stocks. I wouldn’t spend a lot of money until you decide whether or not youi really like carving. Your money is probably better spend on a good sharpening system. Just my opinion. Best of luck with your new hobby.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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MNbuzzdust

99 posts in 2815 days


#2 posted 04-13-2009 06:42 AM

Thanks for that input.
Everything I have read says sharpening is everything. I am thinking of ordering some of the Barton Ceramic stones a Med 600 and the fine. Would these be good to use on both my chip knives and the chisels Or is there a better option

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TopamaxSurvivor

17669 posts in 3139 days


#3 posted 04-13-2009 06:47 AM

Not familiar with them. I have collected a bunch of “stuff” over the years including wet stones, oil stones and a flat steel to use sand paper on. There are a lot more options for “systems” than there were 30 years ago, others can probably answer the question better than I. I was taught to sharpen with the basic tools a long time ago ;-) I even resharpen my own drill bits on a grinder.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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MNbuzzdust

99 posts in 2815 days


#4 posted 04-13-2009 08:38 AM

LoL I resharpen my drill bits on the grinder as well….. I picked up an actual bit sharpener at a garage sale a few years back but it just gathers dust. I still like the grinder better….

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TopamaxSurvivor

17669 posts in 3139 days


#5 posted 04-13-2009 09:24 AM

I got one of those Drill Doctors one time because it should do better than me on small bits, but it doesn’t! You are one of the few people I have met that can do it. Most are amazed. :-)

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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MNbuzzdust

99 posts in 2815 days


#6 posted 04-13-2009 09:59 AM

That is funny. I am probably one of the cheapest people you ever met also… I mean frugal…lol I literally have a huge pack of brand new drill bits hanging on my shop wall for the last 2 years that was a gift. I fugure Ill give them to my son in a few years (regift em) cause I just keep resharpening my old broken stubs over and over.

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Toolz

1004 posts in 3205 days


#7 posted 04-13-2009 04:54 PM

Barton ceramic stones work very well for chip carving knives and carving gouges, also get a ceramic slip stone to hone the inside curve of your gouges. Those along with a strop made from an old belt glued to a narrow piece of wood and a small can of alum. oxide powder for the strop are all I ever used for years.

-- Larry "Work like a Captain but Play like a Pirate!"

View cmaeda's profile

cmaeda

205 posts in 3017 days


#8 posted 04-14-2009 07:21 AM

I actually got into carving not too long ago… maybe 6 months ago. I didn’t know how much I would like it so I bought a bunch at garage sales and estate auctions for between $1 to $5 each. I noticed that the older chisels kept their edge much longer… My best gouge has OHIO TOOL CO stamped on it and it looks pretty old. I think I paid $2 or so for it. I have some newer Buck Bros and some newer no name brand gouges and chisels and they don’t hold an edge for very long.

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TopamaxSurvivor

17669 posts in 3139 days


#9 posted 04-14-2009 08:41 AM

cmaeda, I guess it’s like Thomas MacDonald said in his sharpening video, the big box chisels are just as good as the spendy ones now.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Waldschrat

505 posts in 2898 days


#10 posted 04-14-2009 09:21 AM

For general tools and chisels and such, alot of people I know use Stubai (brand name) They come from Austria… and are supposed to be very good tools. I think that they are expensive though, Kirsche, makes some good carving knives and they run about 20 euros per knife… I have a few and are really good.

I know alot of wood carvers who make thier own tools out of old bandsaw blades (thick ones and blades used for cutting metal) old chisels, old files (have to be old because the new ones are too brittle somehow) and what ever else that is made out of tool grade steel. If you do not mind working on a grinder and shaping stuff… and are frugal, that is how I have made some of my wood turning tools, I buy old tools (mainly old files and rasps) at flea markets for 1 euro or something (the good steel is worth more than that) and shape my own tools…. then again I am not a profi woodcarver and carve and turn for fun…. takes time, but is cheap and one has a custom tool when you are done. (which is something to be proud of too!)

You just just have to be careful not to bring the steel to glowing condition, where the steel turns blue, or black… it has then lost its temper, and will not stay sharp… so its always good when working with a grinder to grind lightly (being careful not to get the steel too hot, then often cool it down in the water. I have an old textbook here somewhere states a specific temp. where steel will loose its hardness, and its relatively and very suprisingly low. (now I am curious, now I will have to dig it out and look it up;-) )
well good luck!

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

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