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Table Saw Safety, Lesson 1

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Forum topic by Buckskin posted 08-03-2007 06:19 AM 1206 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Buckskin

486 posts in 2709 days


08-03-2007 06:19 AM

Topic tags/keywords: safety table saw

Today I was working on a set of pet stairs. We have some small dogs and they like to get up on the couch and look out the window. In the process today I was reminded of a safety lesson.

DO NOT LEAVE CUT STOCK BETWEEN THE FENCE AND THE BLADE!

I was being lazy and wanted to use the fence as a stop block for some repetitive cross cuts. I thought I could move back and forth fast enough to keep them clearing out. WRONG! I ended up with three five inch missiles that would have hit me right in the bread basket had I not been standing left of center. It did not take me long to get my push sticks gathered up after that.

If you must use the fence as a stop block then for safety YOU MUST USE A PUSH STICK to clear the material before making the next cut.

Work safely folks and see you next time.


13 replies so far

View niki's profile

niki

426 posts in 2801 days


#1 posted 08-03-2007 07:05 AM

Hi Backskin

Sorry but I must disagree with you…

Every book about the table saw will tell you, NEVER use the miter gauge with the rip fence as a stop block.

It’s enough that the miter gauge is not 100% square with the rip fence and you will have not one missile but all the Iraq war…

If you want to use the rip fence as stop block, clamp a stop block to the rip fence, at the side near to you so, when you crosscut, the off-cut piece will not have any contact with the rip fence.

Sorry, my English is not so good enough to explain it by words. If you cannot understand, please let me know and I’ll take a few pictures.

Regards
niki

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2882 days


#2 posted 08-03-2007 10:52 AM

phew… glad you are ok!
and good lesson Buckskin and Niki

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4438 posts in 2684 days


#3 posted 08-03-2007 02:19 PM

A good topic. The best bet I’ve found is a cut off box. Take the tiime to build one and you will have more time to have fun. Mine is big enough that I can fit a 30 inch wide glue up in it and trim the ends. It has a stop block that can be adjusted out to about 36 inches or one can be stuck on the floor with double sided tape.I also use an Incra miter gauge with a stop gauge and a Kreg system on the fence of my miter saw. I almost never make a cut by just measuring. I measure the stop block then measure the sample piece. My wife won’t use the table because of being scared of flying missles. And after you have a cut off box don’t be too lazy to use it. sorta like glasses and earmuffs.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

3966 posts in 2785 days


#4 posted 08-03-2007 02:41 PM

Schwwing-ting. Look, new additions to the back wall of the garage!

clearance_Clarence

The safer way. Be careful out there!

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3021 days


#5 posted 08-03-2007 06:16 PM

I do what Doug shows, except the block should be thick enough, so the cutoff piece can’t jam diagonally with the blade.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Buckskin's profile

Buckskin

486 posts in 2709 days


#6 posted 08-03-2007 06:30 PM

Thanks everyone.

Niki and Doug, I had not thought about adding a block and moving the fence over. You can bet I will now.

I have a lenght of 3/4 inch birch plywood attached to my miter gage. I then use a framing square to make any adjustments so that I stay square. The extrushions on my table saw are beveled and I have not yet found a way to safely cut runners to fit and then make an acceptabel cross cut sled.

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

3966 posts in 2785 days


#7 posted 08-03-2007 06:40 PM

Good tip Dick.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2882 days


#8 posted 08-03-2007 06:45 PM

I need more pix.
I almost have no idea what you are talking about .. but then, I don’t use a table saw

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View TomFran's profile

TomFran

2942 posts in 2716 days


#9 posted 08-03-2007 07:31 PM

Doug,
Nice job on the diagram. A picture IS worth a thousand words…

-- Tom, Surfside Beach, SC - Romans 8:28

View niki's profile

niki

426 posts in 2801 days


#10 posted 08-03-2007 08:08 PM

Doug
Thank you for the nice drawing…you saved me the pictures.

Buckskin
I assume that your blade is aligned with the miter slot and the rip fence is aligned to the miter slot…

Lower the blade below the table level…

Push the rip fence as close as you can to almost touch the miter gauge (or your miter gauge fence) and lock it.

Take one of those plastic drawing triangles (the bigger, the better) and check/adjust your miter gauge to be square with the rip fence…and lock the miter gauge…

Framing square is not so accurate sometimes and can lead to small mistakes that can end-up in off 90° cross-cut.
You will be surprised (at least I am) how accurate are those plastic triangles.

Another thing that I do is, clamp the work to the miter gauge fence as in the picture below…(I use the clamp handles as push/pull handle)

You can also glue #100 sanding paper to the miter gauge fence so you can hold it firmly and prevent the work from moving during the cut or when you pull back.

have a safe work
niki

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View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

3966 posts in 2785 days


#11 posted 08-03-2007 08:13 PM

Anything I can do for you Niki is an honor. You are one of my LumberJock heroes.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View Buckskin's profile

Buckskin

486 posts in 2709 days


#12 posted 08-13-2007 04:43 PM

Thank you all for the tips. I applied some of them when I made the pet stairs. So much easier and SAFER!

View Dano's profile

Dano

222 posts in 2753 days


#13 posted 08-14-2007 05:23 AM

The little suckers hurt when they hit, not that I’d know, errr or anything like that…...

-- Dan in Central Oklahoma, Able to turn good wood into saw dust in the blink of an eye!

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