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Help With Flip Top Cart Detail

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Forum topic by todd4390 posted 01-27-2015 11:57 PM 872 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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todd4390

130 posts in 933 days


01-27-2015 11:57 PM

I’m in the planning stages of building a flip top cart for my planer and oscillating sander. The only thing I can’t get my head wrapped around is the hardware/details for the ends of the steel pipe going through the center of the top. Planning on laminating 3 sheets of 3/4” ply together for the top and routing a 1/2” channel for the pipe to be embedded in between 2 of the ply layers. What anchors pipe at each end and allows it to spin freely.


8 replies so far

View DaveinCA's profile

DaveinCA

18 posts in 2479 days


#1 posted 01-28-2015 01:26 AM

I am guilty of over building everything in my shop but I will share this detail of my flip top table (with the near side panel removed) to show a brass busing (McMaster Carr #6338K424) over a 1/2” Pivot Shaft and a Nylon Washer.

 photo 2772bdc2-8b29-4c0f-a31e-3aa2e6af2b57.jpg

In my case the Pivot Shaft and Busing were captured by the two side panels.

-- Dave, Clovis CA

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Holbs

1377 posts in 1494 days


#2 posted 01-28-2015 01:28 AM

I used 3/4” inner and 1 1/4” outer (R14?) bearings. works like a charm! granted, i found 20 of them at an auction for $5… identical to:

They fit snugly and tightly after some raps with a rubber mallet at each end of my 3/4” pipe. I asked my work neighbors who are metal fabricators about what type of steel rod to use, and they said best bang for the buck with a 100 – 200 lbs of range is the pipe with a hollow core (much thicker than your standard EMT conduit by far).
I just drilled 1-2” deep with a 1 1/4” hole saw into the wood at each end…. and whalla! I guess if I pulled the structure apart, the pipe and bearing would come out. But my structure is toughly made with the added weight of the machines, those bearing will never accidentally come out.

If I wanted to be 100% overbearing safe, I would of drilled a 3/4” hole on one side to slip the pipe thru, a 1 1/4” hole on the other side to hold the bearing and cap that end off.

-- Yes, my profile picture is of a Carpenter Bee! The name is derived from the Ancient Greek "wood-cutter"

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todd4390

130 posts in 933 days


#3 posted 01-28-2015 02:05 AM

Dave, when you say you captured the bushing in the side panels did you just bore a hole in the panels or did you insert some type of sleeve for the bushing to freely spin in? By the way thanks for this detail. Helps out a lot.

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

528 posts in 907 days


#4 posted 01-28-2015 02:11 AM

1. Can you just drill a cross-hole in the pipe and drive in a roll pin?

2. If you are using the Rigid sander in the picture, you’ll have to find another place to store the sanding sleeves, table inserts, etc. so they don’t fall on the floor when you flip it over.

View sh00ttok1ll's profile

sh00ttok1ll

6 posts in 975 days


#5 posted 01-28-2015 02:57 AM

When I built mine I simply used a 3/4” dowel for an axle. Seemed logical since I used 3/4” ply for the top. I didn’t have to route anything for channels. I simply drilled holes in the sides for the axle. To retain the axle, I used small caps made out of the same ply as the rest of the cabinet. I drilled holes about 1/2” deep in the caps. This gave me about 1 1/4” of bearing surface. Works like a champ.

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DaveinCA

18 posts in 2479 days


#6 posted 01-28-2015 03:46 AM

In my case the bushings are pressed into a 3/4” non-through hole on the interior surface of the side panel. The bushings are stationary and do not move as they just offer support and a smooth low friction surface for the pivot shaft to rotate in. Therefor the top must be assembled and put in place before the second side is secured.

-- Dave, Clovis CA

View todd4390's profile

todd4390

130 posts in 933 days


#7 posted 01-28-2015 11:51 AM



In my case the bushings are pressed into a 3/4” non-through hole on the interior surface of the side panel. The bushings are stationary and do not move as they just offer support and a smooth low friction surface for the pivot shaft to rotate in. Therefor the top must be assembled and put in place before the second side is secured.

- DaveinCA

Well duh. Don’t know why I was thinking that part was a moving part. Thanks a ton

View gmal's profile

gmal

16 posts in 1087 days


#8 posted 02-04-2015 02:36 AM

I looked up many diagrams on the web to make mine, for a planer (80lbs) and a benchtop belt / disk sander (mayb 40 lbs. Used two pieces plywood and a half inch steel rod from HD, maybe it was $5. Drilled into ply sides. I did make an addition maple bushing, probably not needed. I capped it with plastic half inch end caps, from those h/w bins. Real simple. No problem rotating the top, I did wax the rod when I inserted it.

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