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Installing Euro Hinges

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Forum topic by ynathans posted 01-27-2015 11:49 PM 880 views 1 time favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ynathans

55 posts in 1181 days


01-27-2015 11:49 PM

Hi,

I made a set of raised panel doors for a cabinet and am getting ready to install my 1/2” overlay face frame concealed hinge opening (105 degrees) euro hinges.

I’ve never done it before and my research shows that you’ve got to be pretty precise when installing these or the doors wont open/close right. I’ve done quite a bit of searching but can’t find a good video that shows the process from beginning to end. This video is the closest thing I can find, but I’m not sure about a few things.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B2gfSdjQGdc&list=PLYPmFHtm3WN2gqy2x2HyxxDM70D9MeeLq&index=5

1. He shows the door with the holes drilled. I have a 35mm bit for that. I thought I saw somewhere to position the hole 2mm from the edge of the door? Is that right?

2. His method for aligning the center of the hole on the door with the corresponding bracket is to hold the door up to the frame and make a mark. Is that the best way? Seems like there would be a lot of room for error if you are not holding the door just right etc.

3. One of the videos mentioned a vix bit should be used to drill the holes for the hinges. Is that right? I think there are different vix bit numbers? Can someone tell me the right one to use for my hinges?

4. How do I make sure to get the holes drilled in the right spot for the hinges? There are measurements included in the instructions but it seems real easy to be off by a bit and then I’m sure it wont fit. Is there a jig or template I can get?

Finally, what is the recommended approach if, when I put the doors on and I am off by a bit and they rub. I know the hinges will let me dial back a little, but if I am still off? I dont have a large sander where you can sand the whole door edge at the same time, what is an alternative? Hand plane?

Any other advice to making sure the hinges are installed right is greatly appreciated.

Anyway, thanks for the help!

Nathan


14 replies so far

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NoThanks

798 posts in 992 days


#1 posted 01-28-2015 12:17 AM

More like 4-6mm from the edge. What brand hinge are you using.
Keep in mind, the closer you drill the holes to the edge the more it pushes doors together in the middle.
The farther you drill the holes from the edge, spreads the doors apart.

Are you using a drill press to drill the holes? Set the fence up and do a test cut and measure it, make changes accordingly. All you need to do is measure 3 1/2 to 4” down on each door and mark the center to drill the hole.
Screw on your hinges, put your mounting plates on the hinge, then hold the door on the cabinet where you want it and screw in the mounting plates while they are still attached to the door.

It’s not too tough, and there is a lot of adjustment in the hinge plates to help line everything up if your off a little.

-- Because I'm gone, that's why!

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sawdustjunkie

343 posts in 1180 days


#2 posted 01-28-2015 12:47 AM

You will need to know what the setback is for the hinge, so you can drill the 35mm hole in the correct place.
I have 1/2” setback hinges and drill my 35mm hole 7/8” from the edge of the raised panel.
I usually go 2” from the top and bottom of the door for the hinge, but I think it could be almost any position you want. When you open the door, they should look even from the top and bottom.
To mount the door, just put a straight edge on the bottom of the cabinet, so you can just set the door on it and then screw it to eithe the face frame or cabinet side.

-- Steve: Franklin, WI

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firefighterontheside

13467 posts in 1320 days


#3 posted 01-28-2015 12:53 AM

I think I do 3/16 from the edge and I use a 1 3/8” Forstner bit. I drill the mortise in the door, mount the hinge in the door and then hold the door with hinges up to the cabinet, Mark for holes and drill and then hang the door.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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ynathans

55 posts in 1181 days


#4 posted 01-28-2015 09:51 PM

Thanks for all the input. This is the hinge I am using:

There were a couple different answers about the distance to drill the hole on the door—can someone clarify based on the hinge the recommended distance from the edge based on my hinge? And, yes, I’ll be doing it on the drill press.

And, just to clarify what was said, for the corresponding holes on the cabinet/faceframe, do I just hold the door in place and drill the holes?

Thanks, I’ve got a lot of time into this cabinet and don’t want to screw it up.

Nathan

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NoThanks

798 posts in 992 days


#5 posted 01-28-2015 10:16 PM

They are calling for a distance of 3mm from the edge of the door,
http://www.libertyhardware.com/images/instructionsheets/CP3503-XXX.pdf
Here are the instructions:

I suggest you take a pc of scrap wood and drill it first and mount it to something and make sure it gives you what you want.

-- Because I'm gone, that's why!

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BinghamtonEd

2281 posts in 1833 days


#6 posted 01-28-2015 10:17 PM

I used the liberty overlay hanges on my kitchen island. I got my hinges at Home Depot and they came with instructions that had measurements.

As far marking the holes, I made a template with some scrap that had the holes in them (small center holes just enough to push an awl through to mark the workpiece, not the actual 1 3/8 hole). I attached stops to the template, so I just put it on the door so the stops contacted two edges of the door, and marked the holes. This made sure each hinge spaced the same amount in, and the same amount from the top/bottom of the door.

When mounting time came, I clamped a straight piece of scrap to the front of the cabinet for the doors to rest on. That way, making sure everything was nice and level and straight was easy.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

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firefighterontheside

13467 posts in 1320 days


#7 posted 01-28-2015 10:29 PM

I hold it up to the frame and get it where I want it, then with a pencil Mark the center of the slotted hole. Then for the other doors the same size I measure the original holes and mark for the rest. That way I get them all the same. Make sure you predrilled for all screws being careful not to go all the way thru the door.
After you posted the question last night I went looking for the instructions for the Blum hinges I use. It listed a range of distance from 3mm-8mm I believe. The further from the edge you make the mortise the closer the door edge will come to the face frame when opening. Too far and it will hit.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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ynathans

55 posts in 1181 days


#8 posted 01-29-2015 12:06 AM

Great, thanks for this. @Iwud4u Thanks for pointing out that the instructions say 3mm—I saw that drawing and couldn’t figure out what it was trying to tell me :)

That solves the where to drill the hole question on the cabinet. To clarify what’s being said for the face frame side of the install: I think the advice being given is to clamp a support piece of wood at the bottom of the frame so I can have some support when holding up the doors to mark for the holes. I think since the hinges are 1/2” overlay I’ll want to make sure that the support piece of wood positions the doors 1/2” from the inside? And, do I need to do the same all the way around the door to make sure it is where I need it to be before I mark for the holes? Or am I overthinking this?

Also, the instructions say to “drill 8mmx12mm deep hole for dowels” . I think they are referring to the two pegs on the cup side of the hinge? What is an 8mm hole? I have a full set of twist bits, I dont think there is any 8mm bit. Do I need something special?

Finally, when playing around with the hinge, it seems to require a great deal of pressure to push open, like the hinge is too strong. I’m afraid it will snap the door shut and break it. I got them at home depot—did I make a mistake and go cheap when I shouldnt have?

Thanks a lot guys.

Nathan

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firefighterontheside

13467 posts in 1320 days


#9 posted 01-29-2015 12:11 AM

With the leverage of the door that spring strength won’t seem so strong. It’s just enough to keep the door closed. Did it come with screws or just the dowels. I use ones with screws and not dowels. The hinge is going to take care of the 1/2” overlay on its own as for the overlay around the rest of the frame, that’s totally dependent on how big you made the door.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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Redoak49

1950 posts in 1452 days


#10 posted 01-29-2015 12:26 AM

There is some good advice given. Whenever I am using a new hinge, I will try installing on some scrap wood to make certain I understand everything. If I make a mistake, much better on scrap than on something I have spent a lot of time on.

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ynathans

55 posts in 1181 days


#11 posted 01-29-2015 01:59 AM

Yeah, I will test on scrap.
@firefighterontheside: I see dowels, on the hinge, but I unscrewed the screw that was in the dowel and took the dowel out. I’m thinking I could use a wood screw in its place and not having the dowel there should mean I could more easily mark where to drill the hole, or even just drill directly through?

BTW: where are you a firefighter? I’ve worked (volunteer) on my township ambulance in northern NJ for 23 years. We are a town but we do 4300+ calls per year. I recently made it to the top ten list for number of calls for the ambulance corps history.

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waho6o9

7172 posts in 2040 days


#12 posted 01-29-2015 02:05 AM

Agreed with Redoak49. I have a cab in the garage and mock up

stuff when needed. Saves a lot of time and material.

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firefighterontheside

13467 posts in 1320 days


#13 posted 01-29-2015 02:10 AM

I work at a department about 15 miles south of St. Louis MO. I started as a volunteer in 1992 and then went full time in 1997. I am now a battalion chief, but still get to ride the ladder truck most days during the day. We are all emt’s and have no ambulances. They are from a separate ambulance district that covers our area. I’ve heard of the great tradition of volunteer services in the northeast. Carry on and be safe.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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ynathans

55 posts in 1181 days


#14 posted 02-06-2015 04:04 PM

Hi,

I followed the instructions you guys laid out here and got the hinge installed no problem. I was careful to drill the hinge holes 3mm from the edge as per the hinges instructions. Everything works ok, but there’s a pretty big gap between the face frame and the door. I’m pretty sure I installed it per the instructions, is there a reason there would be such a big gap?

Oh, this is after adjusting the screw on the hinge to bring the door closer to the cabinet. Seems like a pretty huge gap to me…

The hinges were the cheap ones from home depot.

Thanks for all the help getting me to this point.

Nathan

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