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Need to straighten a piece of oak

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Forum topic by 1voyager1 posted 03-25-2015 11:23 AM 1221 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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1voyager1

74 posts in 894 days


03-25-2015 11:23 AM

I need to replace a section of counter top edging.
It has a cross section that I will need to fabricate like so:
 photo DSC_0391A_zpskyap6x8q.jpg

It needs to be 8’ long.
The best piece I could find locally with a matching grain pattern has a goodly amount of bow and crook to it.
 photo DSC_0385A_zpsdh6ahzax.jpg
 photo DSC_0388A_zpsdnkwuzla.jpg

The bow could be fairly easy to deal with.
The crook is another story.
It is too great to remove by trimming the board’s edges.

I screwed a couple of straight 2×4s together and have clamped the offending piece into them.
 photo DSC_0390A_zpsmuo1g7dw.jpg

The oak 1”X3”X8’ has been clamped into the 2X4s over night about 12 hours.
The 2nd and 3rd pics were taken in the morning after removing the clamps.
I’m not sure if there is much improvement from the initial condition.

I’m considering applying water to the concave sides of the oak.
Then, clamping the wet sides against the 2Xs.

Any advice, suggestions or thoughts on dealing with this problem?

-- Every mighty oak is nothing more than a nut that has stood it's ground.


23 replies so far

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

13458 posts in 1318 days


#1 posted 01-27-2015 10:07 PM

How will this piece be attached to the counter? If you can straighten it with the clamps, you should be able to straighten it with the counter, especially a large part,of the wood will be removed and it will be easier to straighten.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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1voyager1

74 posts in 894 days


#2 posted 01-27-2015 10:29 PM

Hi firefighterontheside,
it will be nailed and glued.
But, the problem is not getting it fastened to the counter. That part is trivial. The problem is accurately ripping the 2 lengthwise saw cuts [one from an edge and one from a side] required to form the cross-section and ending up with a decent looking edge piece when it is installed around the counter’s tile surface.

-- Every mighty oak is nothing more than a nut that has stood it's ground.

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shipwright

7167 posts in 2260 days


#3 posted 01-27-2015 10:31 PM

+1 to Bill’s suggestion.
If that doesn’t work, a last resort would be to cut a straight line down the centre of the piece and glue what was the convex top edge to what was the concave bottom edge. Thisshould give you a straight board with no tension and almost the same thickness. You can make the cut by tacking a straight edged piece to yours an run it through the table saw.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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MrUnix

4216 posts in 1661 days


#4 posted 01-27-2015 10:37 PM

Or use a router table to take the material off instead of using a table saw.. however, given the flexibility of the piece, with proper feather boards or other means of pushing it against the fence and table, you should be able to cut that profile without much fuss.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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firefighterontheside

13458 posts in 1318 days


#5 posted 01-27-2015 10:41 PM

When I have to cut something like that I put one concave edge to the fence and one to the table and make sure that the piece stays in contact with the table and fence right in the area of the blade. I think you can get satisfactory results that way. First make your 1/4” cut then stand it up and make the other cut. You may be able to straighten it a bit with your water method at least taking the bow out for a while.
Paul’s method of attaching it to a straight edge such as plywood could work well too. You could even glue it on and then cut it back off after you make your rabbet.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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1voyager1

74 posts in 894 days


#6 posted 01-27-2015 11:02 PM



... cut a straight line down the centre of the piece and glue what was the convex top edge to what was the concave bottom edge. Thisshould give you a straight board with no tension and almost the same thickness. You can make the cut by tacking a straight edged piece to yours an run it through the table saw.

- shipwright


I’ve thought about that approach. The problem is that it would give me one section of the counter’s edging with a grain mismatch running through its middle along its length.


Or use a router table to take the material off instead of using a table saw.. however, given the flexibility of the piece, with proper feather boards or other means of pushing it against the fence and table, you should be able to cut that profile without much fuss.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

I’ve just fab’d a couple of feather boards from 1” Douglas fir.
One has to be placed above while the other needs to be placed on the side of the piece.
It is not very flexible.
It requires too much pressure to remove both the bow and the crook.
Removing the crook requires a lot of pressure.
Accurately ripping the cuts would be very difficult, if even possible.

-- Every mighty oak is nothing more than a nut that has stood it's ground.

View Ghidrah's profile

Ghidrah

667 posts in 684 days


#7 posted 01-27-2015 11:22 PM

You could take one of those straight boards and cut or route 2 parallel lines in it deep enough to push the 1X3X8’ Oak (?) into it to equal the depth of your rip. You could carpet tape the oak in place. Rip the outer line then the inner one with the straight edge against the fence.

-- I meant to do that!

View Danpaddles's profile

Danpaddles

554 posts in 1774 days


#8 posted 01-27-2015 11:31 PM

I know this is outside your parameters- but maybe, try to find a better board? Failing that- feather boards applied, you should be able to make that board behave. Wetting one side is pretty sketchy- and in the end, it may return to original shape anyway.

You could try a nice miter cut half way along the length, just to relieve some tension. Just make a cut, so you lose 1/8 inch saw kerf- but two short pieces may lay better then one long.

-Dan

-- Dan V. in Indy

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runswithscissors

2183 posts in 1487 days


#9 posted 01-28-2015 05:27 AM

I’ve straightened out oak crown molding that looked like a ski by using heat. Don’t need any moisture, just dry heat. A heat gun is a good source of heat, but you have to be careful not to scorch the wood. One end has to be held solid, as in a vise, while you hold the other end and gradually flex it while applying the heat. Be patient, as it will take a while for the heat to penetrate. You’ll want to apply the heat to the convex side of the curve, and pull the wood toward you. Over bend, as there will be some spring back. When you think you have it bent far enough, remove the heat and let the wood cool before releasing your grip on it. Just a few minutes of cooling should be enough.

Though I know from experience that this method works, my confidence is somewhat diminished due to the large cross section of wood you have to heat and bend.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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1voyager1

74 posts in 894 days


#10 posted 01-28-2015 09:51 AM

Thanks folks for your input on this.
Many of your suggestions I’ve already considered and discarded as not getting me where I want to go with this.

I think I’ll try making a quick and dirty steam-box from 4” PVC pipe and fittings, then use steam to soften and straighten the board out.
Yeah, it is a bit over-kill for this particular use.
But, I do have some projects I’ve been considering that will require steam bending.
This will be a good test bed for the method and get me set up for it.

Thanks again guys.

-- Every mighty oak is nothing more than a nut that has stood it's ground.

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1voyager1

74 posts in 894 days


#11 posted 01-30-2015 12:47 AM

I’m back.
My first real job after high school was as an aircraft template maker.
I have never lost then compulsion to work within a 0.03” tolerance when making parts by hand.
No matter what the material.

M’lady is getting a bit miffed because I’ve got her kitchen tore up and have had it that way for over a week now.
She’s got it well in check.
But, I can still tell she’s wearing thin.
So, it’s time to put my analness aside and get moving on towards completion.

Yesterday, I put wedges under the ends of the board and reversed the board’s crook.
 photo DSC_0400_zpsgfeacwly.jpg
This morning most of the crook was gone and what was left didn’t require much pressure to straighten out as it went through the saw.
The rip cuts to form the cross section came out good.
The edging has been fitted and is ready to install and finish.
 photo DSC_0404_zpsuvyj4bho.jpg

M’Lady knows how to motivate me, reward and punishment.
I was not headed for a reward.
Now, I think I am.

-- Every mighty oak is nothing more than a nut that has stood it's ground.

View ElChe's profile

ElChe

630 posts in 798 days


#12 posted 01-30-2015 01:00 AM

Good boy. You get a cookie. :)

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

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firefighterontheside

13458 posts in 1318 days


#13 posted 01-30-2015 01:06 AM

Nice.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

19173 posts in 2137 days


#14 posted 01-30-2015 01:34 AM


Good boy. You get a cookie. :)

- ElChe

I wood think a “biscuit” (with gravy) is more appropriate??? ;^)

Congrats on “gettin’ er done”!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

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TheFridge

5765 posts in 948 days


#15 posted 01-30-2015 02:05 AM

Cookie… Or nookie?

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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