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Why hollow hollow forms?

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Forum topic by TopamaxSurvivor posted 04-09-2009 10:43 AM 800 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TopamaxSurvivor

17676 posts in 3143 days


04-09-2009 10:43 AM

Topic tags/keywords: hollow form turing question

I suppose this sounds like a silly question, but if a hollow form is a piece of art with no practical purpose such as a vase or something of that nature; Why go to the trouble of hollowing them out? Seems like they would be stronger if left solid.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence


8 replies so far

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Waldschrat

505 posts in 2903 days


#1 posted 04-09-2009 11:15 AM

Thats a good question! My guess would be to either to save weight, or just to show off skill.

But thinking about it more I think there is though perhaps a reason that is even better.

Stability... I know that a piece, (especially if highly figured and/or has the pith still in it is way more stable and able to flex with moisture (especially if turned wet) and has a much less chance of cracking or tearing, because with thinner sides there is less material that will move in different directions, usually a very thin vessel turned out of wet stock will warp or oval out, but not necessarily devolope cracks, sometimes…

My 2 cents worth…

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

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TopamaxSurvivor

17676 posts in 3143 days


#2 posted 04-10-2009 02:00 AM

I thought about weight and stability in drying, but I don’t know enough about wood drying to know the answer for sure. One of the turners on here said the sides had to be even to be stable. That makes sense. Sorry, I can’t remember who. Seems like if the wood was dry and acclimated, it would be stronger if solid.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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trifern

8135 posts in 3234 days


#3 posted 04-10-2009 04:42 AM

A hollow form that is not hollow, but has an opening, is called a weed pot.

Most of the hollow forms I turn are turned from green wood. If they are not hollowed out to a thin, even consistency, the vessel will crack. To me, there is just something mysterious and sexy about a vessel that has a small opening and has been hollowed out. When combined with a small foot, the piece seams to dance like a ballerina. The piece has opposites; strong and bold, yet dainty and fragile. The unexpected light weight of a visually heavy piece adds to the mystic. The perplexed look on faces when the peek inside and then ask, “How did you do that?”

-- My favorite piece is my last one, my best piece is my next one.

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Waldschrat

505 posts in 2903 days


#4 posted 04-11-2009 11:18 AM

Very well put trifern!

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

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TopamaxSurvivor

17676 posts in 3143 days


#5 posted 04-11-2009 10:24 PM

Thanks for the replys guys,

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Padre

930 posts in 2956 days


#6 posted 04-12-2009 02:26 AM

If you didn’t hollow a hollow form, it wouldn’t be hollow, therefore it wouldn’t be a hollow form.

If you did hollow a hollow form, it would be hollow, therefore it would be a hollow form.

An unhollow hollow form is a form. Or an unhollow form. Or a hollow form that needs to be hollowed.

:) (just goofin’, Trifern said it right)

-- Chip -----------http://www.penmanchip.com-----------------Micah 6:8

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cabinetmaster

10874 posts in 3025 days


#7 posted 04-12-2009 03:29 AM

I guess you got your answer Topa…......................LOL

-- Jerry--A man can never have enough tools or clamps

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TopamaxSurvivor

17676 posts in 3143 days


#8 posted 04-12-2009 04:03 AM

Chip, Thanks for the laugh! I did think about an unhollowed hollow forn not being a hollow form before I posted this and that solid form jusdt doesn’t sound as good as hollow form :-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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