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RIDGID's REPEATACUT: WHAT DOES IT DO?

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Forum topic by TheNigerian posted 1937 days ago 2828 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TheNigerian

17 posts in 1943 days


1937 days ago

I took my RIDGID 13” thickness planer home yesterday and am just looking forward to the weekend.

However, I just do not understand the explanations in the owner’s manual about the repeatacut feature. What does it do – in spite of the name?

Does it take cuts as thick as the setting ad infinitum or does it take the number of cuts necessary to reach the setting?

Are there any videos about this feature I can take a look at out there please?

I need to sweat this very impressive looking asset.

-- Whether or not you do "...build a superior mousetrap..." remember to provide your address.


21 replies so far

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doyoulikegumwood

384 posts in 2595 days


#1 posted 1937 days ago

i have this same planer all the repeat a cut feature dose is lets say you have a 1” board that you want to make 3/4 of an inch heres what you do set the depth to 1 Inch or better with the handle then set the repeat a cut to 3/4” now feed your board thru, then turn the handle down say half a turn (1/16th”) and do this over and over but you wont be able to turn the handle any more when you hit 3/4”. the repeat a cut is nothing more then a set stop.

you dont need to sweat this feature it is nice to have but not a biggie i would say tho that this is a very good planer and worth every dime.

-- I buy tools so i can make more money,so ican buy more tools so I can work more, to make more money, so I can buy more tool, so I can work more

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TheNigerian

17 posts in 1943 days


#2 posted 1937 days ago

I thank you bud!

I wish the owner’s manual explained it this well and simply.

-- Whether or not you do "...build a superior mousetrap..." remember to provide your address.

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spaids

699 posts in 2296 days


#3 posted 1937 days ago

I have this planer and find that the cut depth stops are great. You can get half way through a project and realize you screwed up (this is guaranteed to happen to me) and you can mill some more stock and not worry about getting the thickness just right because you used the stops.

-- Wipe the blood stains from your blade before coming in.--

View Blair Helgason's profile

Blair Helgason

169 posts in 2016 days


#4 posted 1937 days ago

I don’t mean to stray from the original question but since there are some Ridgid Planer owners here I though I’d take advantage.

I just recently bought the same planer and am have troubles with the infeed outfeed tables. Both are almost 3/16” lower than the planer bed. As you can imagine, this creates a lot of snipe not only on the back (which I expected) but also on the front of my workpiece. I tried to use the adjustment screws but they only change the angle of the table not the height.

Again, I’m really sorry for the off topic question. Thanks a lot!

-- Blair

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ellen35

2557 posts in 2035 days


#5 posted 1937 days ago

Thanks for raising this question. When I first got my Ridgid Planer, it worked beautifully. Now I am getting snipe. I find the tables difficult to set and I am still not sure where to set them. Some say slight tilt up in front…others no. I’d love to hear what other LJs with this machine recommend.
Ellen

-- "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good." Voltaire

View Blair Helgason's profile

Blair Helgason

169 posts in 2016 days


#6 posted 1937 days ago

I’m glad to hear someone else is having the same issue. I figure, when I have the time, I’ll try to disassemble the current tables and make my own. I don’t see how the adjustment screws are supposed to help, with them being directly below a fixed hinge. Doesn’t make sense to me.

-- Blair

View Alan's profile

Alan

443 posts in 2007 days


#7 posted 1937 days ago

I did a review of my rigid planer, my only complaint was snipe, a few people recommended tilting the bed up a little this took some of it away but not all. I like the depth stops but I think your right the manual doesn’t say much about them (it also say to have the tables flat). I still think was good value for the money spent.

-- Alan, Prince George

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doyoulikegumwood

384 posts in 2595 days


#8 posted 1937 days ago

ellen and blair I’m sorry i forgot about this problem my fix was i took the infeed and out feed off and built my own i wish i had a cammara to show you what i did but i basicaly turn the machine into a stationary machine i too couldn’t fix the problem

-- I buy tools so i can make more money,so ican buy more tools so I can work more, to make more money, so I can buy more tool, so I can work more

View CedarFreakCarl's profile

CedarFreakCarl

594 posts in 2656 days


#9 posted 1935 days ago

I’ve got the older two knife Ridgid planer. To make the infeed and outfeed tables level I take an edge jointed perfectly straight board and lay it jointed edge down across the planer bed under the cutterhead. Turn the crank until the board is secured by the rollers, then adjust the little infeed and outfeed tables until they are level with the bottom of the board. Also I’ve got some el-cheapo roller stands that I use for additional outfeed support. I place the first one about 6 or 8” out from the edge of the outfeed table and adjust it up to the bottom of the jointed board. I then put a couple more about 18” apart on out from the first one, all adjusted up to the bottom of the jointed edge board. The Idea is to make the outfeed rolllers or you can make an outfeed table, but they need to be precisely on the same plane as the bed of the planer. It also needs to extend far enough to support your board on the outfeed side for at least 2/3’s of the board length so there’s no “tipping up” of the end of the planed board when it exits the planer. Actually to do this right, the infeed side needs the same attention to detail and board support. Once the is done and we’re perfectly parallel to the planer bed the next important thing is to have one side of the board to be planed perfectly flat on one side. If it’s twisted slightly, no amount of preparation will keep it from kicking up or down when it enters and exits the cutterhead. If you don’t have a jointer, you can make an MDF planer sled and put your board to be jointed on it and use small wedges under the board to keep it from moving while planing a flat side. Once we’re flat on one side, just remove it from the sled, flip it over and plane the other side. If you’re proficient with hand planes and winding sticks, you can plane one side flat by hand and accomplish the same end. I’m not so good with hand tools. The last thing is to make sure the cutterhead is locked down. If you go to these pains, you can all but eliminate snipe. (at least I have) If all else fails, just make your planed board 6 or 8 inches longer than the finished length and cut off the sniped ends.

-- Carl Rast, Pelion, SC

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Blair Helgason

169 posts in 2016 days


#10 posted 1935 days ago

Hey Pat, that’s a great idea running a table all the way through the planner and bypassing the planner bed completely. I would’ve never thought of doing that. It makes total sense. Why try to level three tables when you can just make one perfectly flat one. Thanks a lot for directing me to your pics. That’s the next project I’ll be working on.

-- Blair

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phil619

35 posts in 2054 days


#11 posted 1935 days ago

I have the ridgid r4330 planer and also was experienceing snipe after I set up per the owners manual instructions. So I took my 4’ straight edge and spaned it across both infeed and outfeed tables. I then adjusted both tables so that the straight edge sat flat on the planer bed and the table ends were co-planer. This resulted in the both tables being slightly tilted upward,( about 3/16 to zero). Which I believe reduces the amount of snipe, provide the work piece is long enough to span from the outfeed roller to the end of the outfeed table. I agree adjusting the tables are a pain and takes alot of trial an error, but after several test runs I observed virtually no snipe. Be sure to double check everything after you lock down the adjusting bolts.
Hope this helps.

-- Building fine furniture in my driveway.

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ellen35

2557 posts in 2035 days


#12 posted 1935 days ago

I just did a search on the Ridgid forum. So…how can the manual be wrong (that was a joke!). Several people on that forum talked about the “penny” method. Put a penny on each end of the planer bed and put the level on the pennies thus raising it the height of the penny. Then raise the infeed and outfeed tables to meet the level. Of course, others say the infeed and outfeed tables must be absolutely even with the planer bed. I am sooooo confused! My guess is that it is trial and error…and what works for one may not necessarily work for another. I usually plane short (approx 20”) boards for cutting boards. I do like the “replacement” that MVWOODWORKS designed. I’d be interested in how well that works, especially for short boards.
Ellen

-- "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good." Voltaire

View Blair Helgason's profile

Blair Helgason

169 posts in 2016 days


#13 posted 1934 days ago

I just have to say that I feel bad for re-directing this forum, I know wasn’t the original intention. But… I would like to thank everyone for jumping in and answering my question so quickly. It really helps.

-- Blair

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ellen35

2557 posts in 2035 days


#14 posted 1934 days ago

Blair,
Consider starting another forum on the Ridgid 4330!
I’ll play!
Ellen

-- "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good." Voltaire

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TheNigerian

17 posts in 1943 days


#15 posted 1933 days ago

Wow!

It really is good to be here.

I did use my RIDGIG over the weekend and consider it a great buy.

Then I log on today to ask questions about snipe and the answers are posted already!

Thank God for Lumberjocks!

And thank you all for taking time to contribute.

-- Whether or not you do "...build a superior mousetrap..." remember to provide your address.

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