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Bee Box Cut Down

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Forum topic by wdbutcher71 posted 1962 days ago 1014 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wdbutcher71

36 posts in 2053 days


1962 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question bandsaw tablesaw blade

I have been asked a question as a wood worker that I don’t have a good answer for so I figured I would ask the LJ’s.

A friend is an amature bee keeper, who has purchased 50+/- used hives. He wants to cut them down to smaller hives. The problem is that where he needs to cut there is a high likleyhood of hitting 6d nails.

So the question is what would you use to cut down these boxes. We are thinking a TS with the cheapest carbide blade we can find or my band saw with a metal blade. But I am not sure my band saw hase enough throat for the boxes.

Anybody have any bright ideas? Or a blade they have used for a similar prupose with success?

Thanks,
Matt

-- Matthew M. Central Washington


9 replies so far

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wdbutcher71

36 posts in 2053 days


#1 posted 1962 days ago

bentlyj:
Thought about a sawzall, but their not very accurate.

-- Matthew M. Central Washington

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1278 posts in 2364 days


#2 posted 1962 days ago

I would try to find someone with a bandsaw that has a large height opening. You could then put on a bi-meta blade that would cut anything.

Another possibility would be to make a guide with stops on it that can be clamped to the box and use a nail cutting skill saw blade. You could then cut one side at a time and just go around the box. Make SURE to use eye protection, a full face mask, and lots of clothing. The sparks from cutting nails can get pretty hot.
I have used saw blades before that cut nails when repairing old floors.
I do not recommend a carbide toothed blade because the carbide will shatter when hitting nails.

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

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Dkol

70 posts in 1988 days


#3 posted 1962 days ago

Sabre saw with bimetal blade and a straight edge guide.

View Waldschrat's profile

Waldschrat

505 posts in 2062 days


#4 posted 1962 days ago

Wdbutcher71,

I know it sounds labor intensive, but is there no way of pulling out the nails?

How bout a handheld circular saw? (its kind of hard to tell with out a pic, i have to say) perhaps a handheld jigsaw or something….

Dont think a chainsaw would be good, because if yo hit nails, well… its just not good either.

(this may sound like a joke, but…) couldn’t your friend, just take 25 of the beehive boxes and be happy with that?, instead of having 50 small, why not say 25 big ones?

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

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wdbutcher71

36 posts in 2053 days


#5 posted 1962 days ago

Waldschrat:
To be honest I don’t know alot about how the boxes are built. Beyond having seen bee hives in and around orchards. What my friend has is 50 hives that are used equipment, some are either damaged on the top or rotting off on the bottom. He is just trying to salvage as many as possible. Thanks for the input.

-- Matthew M. Central Washington

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Kindlingmaker

2654 posts in 2153 days


#6 posted 1962 days ago

Ok, I will confess here… I use a skill saw, wear eye protection and saw through 16 penny nails, (and a lot of them). Use a cheap blade and not a carbide one, too brittle, but HSS or maybe molyB. I use the HF blades and they actully hold up for a long time and they cheap enough that they can be concidered disposable. Oh course this is not good woodworking practices but sometimes the need far exceeds the proper.

-- Never board, always knotty, lots of growth rings

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Kindlingmaker

2654 posts in 2153 days


#7 posted 1962 days ago

Oh, I almost forgot… Go slow!

-- Never board, always knotty, lots of growth rings

View wdbutcher71's profile

wdbutcher71

36 posts in 2053 days


#8 posted 1962 days ago

Thanks guys, lots of good ideas.

-- Matthew M. Central Washington

View Toddmc's profile

Toddmc

30 posts in 1996 days


#9 posted 1962 days ago

I am actually building a bee hive right now for a friend who did not want a full size hive. I am building a langstroth style beehive, and all we did was omit the shallow super (the topmost portion). There is no negitive affect on the colony from doing this other than a smaller hive. I do not know what stlye of beehive your friend has, but if it has multiple sections like most bee hives simple take off the top section (leaving the cover of course).

Here is a good resourse to look at:
http://www.beesource.com/plans/index.htm

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