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Forum topic by pommy posted 04-06-2009 10:02 PM 829 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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pommy

1697 posts in 3159 days


04-06-2009 10:02 PM

Topic tags/keywords: joining cherry question tip

Hi LJs

I have a question that i think you can help me with i have purchased some lovely cherry boards 300mm+ x 20mm x 2500mm but i have dialema.
Once i have planed them down i think that the overall thickness will be under 15mm
so my Questions is
(1) when i make the carcass what is a suitable size and material to use

(2) is glue and screw the prefered joining method ( Using screw blocks )

thank you fo your time

Andy

-- cut it saw it scrap it SKPE: ANDREW.CARTER69


5 replies so far

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Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 3289 days


#1 posted 04-06-2009 10:23 PM

Andy, I am not sure what you are trying to make but 15mm will be a little small to use except maybe on a box or drawer side. Normally for carcass work you would need at least 19mm stock.

Joinery is largely a matter of personal choice. I have used both mortise and tenon and glue with pocket screws for face frames when I have used cherry for my cabinetry.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

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PurpLev

8523 posts in 3116 days


#2 posted 04-06-2009 10:30 PM

like Scott said, joinery is really a matter of personal preference… for most fine-woodworking though, screws is not exactly the preferred method – but traditional joinery and mechanical joinery such as mortise and tenon, dovetails, and box joints are the preferred methods, splined miters are also doable. Although – screws WILL do the job.

as far as thickness -it really depends on what you’re trying to make? a small box – you should do fine with 15mm. a drawer cabinet? probably not.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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pommy

1697 posts in 3159 days


#3 posted 04-06-2009 10:55 PM

thanks guys for your input i’m thinking of making a sideboard for the diningroom and i was sort of hoping to wrap the carcass like extra thick veneer using traditional joinery but i think i’m blowing in the wind

thanks again

andy

-- cut it saw it scrap it SKPE: ANDREW.CARTER69

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PurpLev

8523 posts in 3116 days


#4 posted 04-06-2009 11:17 PM

might be a bit of an overhead project – when you think about it – it’s not veneering – it’s building a cabinet inside a cabinet – double everything (joinery/materials/time/energy) seems a bit wasteful. but thats just me :o)

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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johnpoolesc

246 posts in 2828 days


#5 posted 04-09-2009 02:25 AM

i had a simular problem a few years back with some walnut burl.. building a blanket chest.. i glued thin red cedar to the back of my stock. then did the flat panel design.. walnut exterior, red cedar interior.. the only change was i could not use raised panel and i could not have any endgrain exposed on the finished chest.. my daughter still uses the chest, and it did not split.. of course the grain direction had to match..

-- It's not a sickness, i can stop buying tools anytime.

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