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need advice, finishing interior of apron table?

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Forum topic by martin007 posted 04-05-2009 08:20 PM 531 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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martin007

141 posts in 2434 days


04-05-2009 08:20 PM

Hi

I am getting ready to finish a table with danish oil, should I finish the interior of the aprons also, so that the pieces are in equilibrum?

thanks

Martin

-- Martin, Gatineau, Québec


5 replies so far

View Waldschrat's profile

Waldschrat

505 posts in 2094 days


#1 posted 04-05-2009 08:41 PM

Yes,

but I dont think that if you did not it would detiorate the structural ingrity of the piece.

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

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Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2480 days


#2 posted 04-05-2009 10:26 PM

Martin, I will have to agree with Nicholas. Finishing all sides on a piece of furniture helps prevent cupping from unequal moisture in the wood. Putting a finish on the underside/inside of the piece does take extra time but after the effort that has gone into the piece up to that point it is well worth the effort.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

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hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 2786 days


#3 posted 04-06-2009 01:07 AM

Martin:

I have a house full of antique furniture, where most pieces do not have finish on unseen sides.
Let’s give it another 100 years and see what happens. <grin>

-- 温故知新

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Waldschrat

505 posts in 2094 days


#4 posted 04-06-2009 02:15 PM

thats true drgoodwood! I did not think of that! ;-) not to mention check out the dovetails on some old pieces of furniture, man, my master would chew me out if I worked like that!

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

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hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 2786 days


#5 posted 04-06-2009 04:49 PM

Nicholas:

In particular, so called Danish Oil doesn’t really impede the migration of moisture in and out of wood.
The old time furniture makers seldom wasted materials and efforts on finishing the unseen surfaces of their creations. Of course they were more likely to use furniture-grade woods that were completely seasoned and usually prepared better than today. Riven, quarter-sawn and grain orientated assembly were more common.

Heavier modern finishes, like polyurethane, might imbalance finished wood.
Again, so called Danish Oil is insipid and is meant to be a minimalist finish, not a protective barrier finish.

Antonio Stradivari didn’t varnish the insides of his violins but he did choose and prepare the wood with an artful eye and the skill of a master.

I have many fond memories of Garmisch…

-- 温故知新

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