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When to joint & plane?

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Forum topic by Bret posted 04-05-2009 04:36 PM 3564 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Bret

162 posts in 2954 days


04-05-2009 04:36 PM

I’m about to embark on my first project using hardwood. Until now, everything I’ve done has used dimensional lumber and sheetgoods from my local Home Depot, but now I’m going to build a craftsman-style quilt rack for my wife and another (at the same time) for her quilting partner.

I’ve got a bunch of 3/4 thick white oak sitting in my lumber rack. I bought the wood at Rockler yesterday on sale and it looks like it’s probably surfaced on both faces but I’m not 100% certain of this—there are some blemishes and such.

All of the pieces I need for this project are 3/4” thick, so I don’t need to plane for thickness, but I may want to clean up the faces a bit. The boards look straight to my naked eye.

I own neither a jointer nor a planer, but I have a friend who has both and could probably joint up to 6” and plane all of the boards as they are.

Question: Should I rough cut all the pieces I need first and joint/plane them after, or should I joint and plane the raw lumber before cutting out the blanks for the various parts? How should I decide whether to joint and plane at all or just proceed to preparing the pieces and going for it?

Thanks!

Bret

-- Woodworking is easy as 3.14159265358979323846264338327950288419716939937510...


10 replies so far

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11806 posts in 3147 days


#1 posted 04-05-2009 05:01 PM

Without seeing the “defects” in your lumber it is a tough question to answer.Personal experience is to dimension the stock first and cut to size afterwards because you never know what might happen when planing or jointing the stock. ie: tear-out of grain , sniping from the planer , etc….. Do you plan on using it as 3/4” or maybe 5/8” will work for you if your “defects” require that much resurfacing to clean up. You can’t plane or joint a board without losing thickness . Have your buddy with the planer cast his eye upon the “defects” and advise you from there. Best I can do from here for you : ) Best wishes and don’t forget to post it when you’re done with it (them).

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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Bret

162 posts in 2954 days


#2 posted 04-05-2009 05:06 PM

One board has some serious tear-out at one end (don’t know how I missed it when picking the boards out!) Several have minor dents and/or teeth marks around the edges where I think I could just “waste” that portion. One has a nice grain pattern but some chatter marks (I think that’s what they are) are visible but look to me like they could be sanded out.

I could probably do 5/8 and just adjust all the mortise & tenon sizes to match. But I guess you’re right—I’ll give my friend a call and have him give it all a look-over.

One other question: How long should the boards sit in my Denver garage shop before I start working with them? A week, a month, or don’t worry about it (especially since our humidity levels lately have been all over the map—normally dry, but late season snows)?

-- Woodworking is easy as 3.14159265358979323846264338327950288419716939937510...

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oldskoolmodder

799 posts in 3139 days


#3 posted 04-05-2009 05:34 PM

While it’s good to know you are in Denver specifically, in my experience in Colorado, (I spend a LOT of time out there) the weather is so iffy, that it’s very hard to say how long it should sit. I’ve been there when it was snowing in the morning, got very warm during the mid-day and then by late afternoon, it was snowing again. And not just during winter. I’d say if you are really worried about humidity, maybe the best thing to do is to assemble and perhaps keep the pieces inside the house where it may be more stable when you aren’t working on it, or when you assemble it. If possible.

-- Respect your shop tools and they will respect you - Ric

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Bret

162 posts in 2954 days


#4 posted 04-05-2009 05:54 PM

Once I get the pieces cut to rough size, that ought to be possible, provided my wife approves.

Slightly off-topic: Does anyone have experience using a 6” dado set on a 10” portable table saw? All the space I could afford in my garage shop was for a portable, a Craftsman 21806, and the manual says it can handle a 6” stacked dado set. Should I believe that or not?

-- Woodworking is easy as 3.14159265358979323846264338327950288419716939937510...

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toolman409

20 posts in 2865 days


#5 posted 04-06-2009 03:27 AM

Bret,

I sold Craftsman tools part time for a couple years, back when I was aquiring tools for a more serious woodshop. Was able to get some good deals on some returns, high end Craftsman models and also other mfrs on closeouts.

SHORT ANSWER INSERTED: after giving long answer below, I checked out specs on your saw on Sears website. I did not see any reference to using a dado blade on your saw. Nor did I see any on the reviews as I just skimmed them. I am afraid your manual may be wrong. I say that because I know from experience some text items in their manuals can refer to other models. I hope I’m wrong for your sake. You will need to measure the shaft as I indicate below.

LONG ANSWER:
What I found on MOST of the Craftsman table saws was the shaft was too short to accommodate much of a dado blade. Most customers didn’t seem to care, which always amazed me. I can use a stacking dado on my 10” Craftsman (proffessional model). You will need to measure how much shaft you have left with a single blade installed. You might be able to help yourself a little by changing out to a thinner washer. Of course you will need a dado throat plate. You can make one if one did not come with the saw – some do and some don’t. They are all different for different models. I ordered one for mine. With shipping it was expensive, I thought.

I don’t know if an adjustable dado blade will take any less shaft. I have a couple, both need about 15/16” shaft.

I wonder why they limit you to 6”. (They may be referring to another model, anyhow.) My Freud stacking set is 8” but both the adjustables are 7”. Maybe the max power of the saw? I would think a 7” would work physically as well as 6” on a 10” saw. Unless you plan to cut some real deep dadoes where a larger blade might bog down the motor on extra deep cuts.

Hope this answers yours question. Let me know if you think an old tool guy can help. I worked through my share of frustrating “Craftsman” issues. I would hate to have to do what I did, then, now that they have cut back so much. I was more percistent than most other associates and usually found some technical help via phone. I don’t know if that is possible now days.

Best of luck to you.

-- Keith, NW Alabama

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Dusty56

11806 posts in 3147 days


#6 posted 04-06-2009 03:42 AM

I started out with a Delta benchtop TS and it too was limited to the 6 inch dado set due to the size of the motor. Don’t worry about ever needing an 8 inch set-up …..Chances are that most of your dado cuts will be 3/4” or less and for your own safety , make sure you clamp or bolt that saw down to something solid !

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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Bret

162 posts in 2954 days


#7 posted 04-30-2009 06:46 PM

Just to finish this out…

I got an Oldham 6” stacked dado set from Amazon (for $40) and while I can’t use all the chippers at once, I can easily fit the outer blades plus three of the larger chippers and still see threads after fitting the bolt back onto the arbor. So far, I’ve been able to run the saw and my shop vac on a single 15 amp circuit while cutting the dadoes without blowing any fuses (the saw along pulls 15amp), which I couldn’t do with a normal 10” blade while ripping.

The only real complaint I have about this saw is that the throat plates are really thin (even 1/8” hardboard is thicker so I’m toying with thoughts of building a front-to-back sheet of hardboard that would essentially cover the whole work area) and there’s no miter slot. The left table moves instead, but having that miter slot would’ve been nice….

-- Woodworking is easy as 3.14159265358979323846264338327950288419716939937510...

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Bret

162 posts in 2954 days


#8 posted 04-30-2009 06:47 PM

Oh, and the friend I referenced above just sold me his jointer (a 6” Jet) for $200. It’s moving into my garage shop this weekend. Now I just need a planer, and a DC, and…

-- Woodworking is easy as 3.14159265358979323846264338327950288419716939937510...

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3108 days


#9 posted 04-30-2009 07:31 PM

check the lumber with a straight edge… not your naked eye. a board needs to be flat in order for you to be able to safely run it past your table saw!

if you are planning on jointing/planing those boards, cut them to tough sizes first then joint and plane each (oversized) part individually , that will help you in 2 was:

1. each smaller part will have less of a twist/cup in it than the entire board = less material lost to joint that face flat
2. parts being jointed are smaller – less overhead on your jointer+blades, and less work for you.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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Bret

162 posts in 2954 days


#10 posted 05-01-2009 06:52 PM

Glad to hear that advice—I’m building a set of quilt racks for my wife, her quilting buddy, and my mother. I pre-cut all the pieces and will be (edge) jointing the bits I need to—I bought 3/4 s2s and needed, you guessed it, 3/4” stock for the project. Live and learn. But the pieces are all reasonably true already so I think if I stick to just jointing the edges that need to be glued up (the sides & top, really) I ought to be fine.

-- Woodworking is easy as 3.14159265358979323846264338327950288419716939937510...

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