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Lee Valley Veritas Router Plane Blade - Made in Taiwan?!

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Forum topic by Pendragon1998 posted 01-22-2015 06:26 PM 1955 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Pendragon1998

74 posts in 1039 days


01-22-2015 06:26 PM

I just took a look at my latest order for Lee Valley. I got a Veritas router plane for Christmas plus a LV gift card, so I ordered an extra 3/16” router blade. Imagine the ill feeling I had in my stomach when I looked at the label on the new blade (blade that came with my router on top, new blade on bottom).

I did not get a fancy, expensive Veritas plane to stick made in Taiwan junk blades into it. I am so irritated. I’m going to talk to customer service to see if I can get a made in Canada blade (assuming they have them). I don’t have a lot of Veritas stuff, but I was under the impression that they were made in Canada.


27 replies so far

View NinjaAssassin's profile

NinjaAssassin

629 posts in 1188 days


#1 posted 01-22-2015 06:27 PM

Is the Taiwan blade really junk?

-- - Billy

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Pendragon1998

74 posts in 1039 days


#2 posted 01-22-2015 06:39 PM

If I wanted a tool made in Asia, I’d go to harbor freight or Lowes. Veritas is a premium brand and I expect them to be made in Canada or the USA. They’re diluting their brand. I’d have bought a rusty old Stanley before I bought a made in Taiwan tool. I don’t care whose brand name is stamped on the tool in Taipei. Is it junk? I don’t know, but I have seen enough Asian crap tools that I think they are likely doing themselves a disservice. I try and support tool manufacturing in N. America as much as I can.

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jmartel

6569 posts in 1613 days


#3 posted 01-22-2015 06:41 PM

Their site states that the blades are not made in Canada. It says “Made in Canada (except for blades)”

http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/page.aspx?p=52609&cat=1,41182,48945&ap=1

Not sure when they switched from manufacturing in Canada to Taiwan. I wouldn’t worry about it being from Taiwan though.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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Pendragon1998

74 posts in 1039 days


#4 posted 01-22-2015 06:44 PM

How disappointing. I got the router as a gift, including the starter blades that were made in Canada (as you can see in my photo), so I didn’t see the note on the website. I guess they outsourced them. Ugh.

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

8303 posts in 3111 days


#5 posted 01-22-2015 06:45 PM

You might be able to get Ron Hock or just about any smith
to make up an iron for you. Lee Valley will take a return, no problem.

View NinjaAssassin's profile

NinjaAssassin

629 posts in 1188 days


#6 posted 01-22-2015 06:50 PM

Well, the reason I ask is, I bought a 1/2” blade and it arrived a week ago. I haven’t opened it yet and didn’t pay attention to where it was made. If it’s made with an inadequate steel for the purpose, is machined poorly or is of otherwise poor quality (i.e. junk) then that’s useful to know. If it’s not of poor quality, then that’s also useful to know.

I’m not trying to be argumentative or a jerk here. I just don’t think being made in Taiwan, alone, necessarily qualifies these blades as junk.

-- - Billy

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1184 days


#7 posted 01-22-2015 06:58 PM

I’m looking for an iron for my old Stanley router plane and this is good to know. I have to agree with the OP here, when you’re shopping from a premium maker, it does matter where it’s made, regardless of what level of quality control it’s being put through.

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jmartel

6569 posts in 1613 days


#8 posted 01-22-2015 06:59 PM

For what it’s worth, Taiwan and Japan are probably the best places in Asia to source from, typically. So, at least it’s not Chinese, or Indian origin.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View dawsonbob's profile

dawsonbob

1915 posts in 1219 days


#9 posted 01-22-2015 07:02 PM

Say, does anyone remember when everyone thought “Made in Japan” meant junk? Taiwan seems to have gone the same route, and can now produce some pretty high quality items.

I think it’s up to the company who puts their name on it to insure quality control. If I bought an item marked, for instance, Bosch, then I would expect Bosch quality, no matter where the item was actually made.

I suspect that the blade in question is made to Veritas’ standards.

-- Mistakes are what pave the road to perfection

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Loren

8303 posts in 3111 days


#10 posted 01-22-2015 07:02 PM

Toolmaking is a complex industry. The English are having trouble
keeping it in Sheffield and it’s most disappeared from the Western
Mass, where it was a big deal in the states for a long time… water
power, you know.

Lee Valley used to be kind of a bargain supplier. The owner would
go to tool shows all over the world looking for cool stuff to
distribute. He even tried to launch a line of premium bench
planes about 30 years ago and the market wasn’t ready for it.
The market is accepting the new line quite well but the company
is, I am sure, still very careful about costs and value across
the board. Jessem is another Canadian company and they
put some of their manufacturing overseas and the QC on the
machining of the aluminum parts was a disaster (seen it in
person… ugly). LV manages to delver exquisite castings
and machined parts but they of course look for economy where
they can…. their cabinet pullouts come with awful, soft
screws for example. They could replace them in Canada,
and I know they are aware the screws suck, but it’s a
caveat to value they are willing to continue making.

View mramseyISU's profile

mramseyISU

419 posts in 1009 days


#11 posted 01-22-2015 07:03 PM

If it’s that new powdered metal they are using then I’m not at all surprised it came from Taiwan. I buy powdered metal from Taiwan all the time and it’s generally really good quality.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

View jacquesr's profile

jacquesr

339 posts in 886 days


#12 posted 01-22-2015 10:58 PM

The ones made in Taiwan are clearly not as good as the other ones.
There is no “Caution – Sharp” notification on the packaging… LOL

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4452 posts in 3424 days


#13 posted 01-22-2015 11:13 PM

Tooling is made to the specifications from the buyer. Don’t get freaked out by origin.
These guys don’t spec junk.
Have you used the blade?
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View lateralus819's profile

lateralus819

2236 posts in 1353 days


#14 posted 01-22-2015 11:32 PM

Too many people saying how over seas manufacturing produces “quality” products. That may be so, but it’s “overseas” I.E. Not N.A. or in this case Canada. The defining factor i went and spent a good chunk on LN was because they are made in U.S.A.

View NinjaAssassin's profile

NinjaAssassin

629 posts in 1188 days


#15 posted 01-22-2015 11:45 PM

There’s nothing wrong with that, Kevin. But the geographic region in which a product is manufactured is not what determines whether or not it’s a quality product. Not wanting to buy a product because it’s manufactured somewhere else is one thing. It’s a completely different matter to automatically assume a product manufactured somewhere else is junk.

Anyway, I was sincerely curious if the iron is any good.

-- - Billy

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