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Squaring end grain without a shooting board.

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Forum topic by AESamuel posted 01-22-2015 04:04 PM 1116 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AESamuel

61 posts in 690 days


01-22-2015 04:04 PM

Hi!

I’m making a candle holder out of Sapele at the moment and I have five 50×50x70 pieces and I would like to square up the end grain so they are square both to the sides.

I used a number 4 hand plane to square the sides, and I also have a small block plane. I have used a shooting board in the past to square up my end grain but these pieces are too big for me to do with my no.4

Can anybody tell me the best approach to squaring the end grain nice and flat without the use of a shooting board? Or should I put it on the shooting board and to one side, then flip it over and try and match the other side?

Many thanks from a newbie woodworker!


8 replies so far

View jmartel's profile

jmartel

6578 posts in 1617 days


#1 posted 01-22-2015 04:34 PM

If you had another larger plane that has a wider blade, you would use that. a 4 1/2, 5 1/2, 6, and 7 all use blades that are around 60mm, so it would just depend on the depth of the plane track. If you had a 6mm depth for the plane track, you would be able to make it work.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View JohnChung's profile

JohnChung

372 posts in 1542 days


#2 posted 01-22-2015 04:46 PM

End grain? You have your work out soon enough.
I checked the janka rating of Sapele looks like hardwood.

In this case…... You will need a low angle plane like a block plane and plane the end grain to the lines.
I have done this before and it works. Just slower but it works well.

Stanley #4 will not work well in this case due to the hardwood. For softwood I will use it.

View buck_cpa's profile

buck_cpa

147 posts in 1355 days


#3 posted 01-22-2015 04:46 PM

do you have a miter box? that’s the route I would go.

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1667 posts in 2091 days


#4 posted 01-22-2015 05:00 PM

Scribe a line square to the edge and plane to it. Sapele is very easy to work. Basic plane work is required, be sure to knock the far end down so you don’t get tear out on the end.

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

View NinjaAssassin's profile

NinjaAssassin

629 posts in 1192 days


#5 posted 01-22-2015 05:07 PM

Be sure to sharpen your iron, too. You can use a #4 on hardwood end grain and get great results. Jumbojack gave you good advice.

-- - Billy

View JohnChung's profile

JohnChung

372 posts in 1542 days


#6 posted 01-22-2015 05:24 PM

@jumbojack what is the janka rating of Sapele?
http://ejmas.com/tin/2009tin/tinart_goldstein_0904.html Is this reference off?

View bobro's profile

bobro

308 posts in 778 days


#7 posted 01-22-2015 07:11 PM

Sapele and its relatives are only about as hard as beech, a touch harder than oaks. lessee…

http://www.wood-database.com/lumber-identification/hardwoods/sapele/

yeah, the Janka rating of Sapele is 1410, European beech is 1450, oaks vary from about 1100-1400 (you can check all this at the wood database). But like jumbojack said, sapele is easy to work, because it’s not just about hardness, but about the consistency and texture of the wood. For example, pear is significantly harder than any oak but it’s a creamy dream to work with handtools, like soapstone or something.

An option to a low-angle plane is a very HIGH angle plane, like the 60-degree planes they use in China and Japan. I don’t know if anyone still makes 50-60 degree Western block and jointing planes, but they’re the same idea: you get a kind of scraper action with the steep pitch, and it’s happy with end grain and very hard woods. I have a 60 degree traditional Chinese plane and it just laughs at end grain.

Anyway, put the board up on edge, scribe a line and plane to that as jumbojack said. The things to watch for are the dreaded dip in the middle, blowing out the ends, and sloping the whole edge so the sides/ends aren’t parallel. Also, going unsquare to the face.

-- Lao Ma: You are so full of anger and hatred. Xena: Everybody's gotta be full of something.

View Derek Cohen's profile

Derek Cohen

296 posts in 3436 days


#8 posted 01-23-2015 04:53 PM



Hi!

I m making a candle holder out of Sapele at the moment and I have five 50×50x70 pieces and I would like to square up the end grain so they are square both to the sides.

I used a number 4 hand plane to square the sides, and I also have a small block plane. I have used a shooting board in the past to square up my end grain but these pieces are too big for me to do with my no.4

Can anybody tell me the best approach to squaring the end grain nice and flat without the use of a shooting board? Or should I put it on the shooting board and to one side, then flip it over and try and match the other side?

Many thanks from a newbie woodworker!

- AESamuel

Attach a fence to the side of your plane to ensure it runs square. Make this from wood, or use a metal version from Lee Valley.

Regards from Perth

Derek

-- Buildiing furniture, and reviewing and building tools at http://www.inthewoodshop.com

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