LumberJocks

Finishing some oak

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by Deanna posted 01-22-2015 12:06 AM 1046 views 1 time favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Deanna's profile

Deanna

29 posts in 720 days


01-22-2015 12:06 AM

Topic tags/keywords: oak question tip finishing

I sanded some white oak up to 220 and its shiny. I am doing a walnut with bronze highlights. Should I re-sand to 180? I fear I sealed the wood and want to take it to the right place to capture the stain. (I need to be careful when reading the forums.) Any thoughts?

Has anyone ever added a bronze to an untinted stain? Can I use a water base latex to an untinted stain?

Thanks for your comments


11 replies so far

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2566 posts in 1719 days


#1 posted 01-22-2015 12:31 AM

Deanna, I routinely sand white oak to 220 and then apply TransTint dye in either Target’s WR40xx (clear) or EM1000. I haven’t ever tried for a bronze color, but look at this project for a similar (maybe) effect. HTH

-- Art

View Deanna's profile

Deanna

29 posts in 720 days


#2 posted 01-22-2015 01:14 AM

Very, very pretty. Stunning finish. Looking for more bronze than honey though. I purchased GF Antique Walnut gel stain (no talented enough yet to do all the mixing but we will get there) and the color is great just need the tones or grain to be bronze. Was looking into mixing bronze pigment or bronze metallic paint with a wood stain untinted. Think its a bad idea?

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2566 posts in 1719 days


#3 posted 01-22-2015 01:43 AM

The best I can offer is to try various approaches on scrap samples that have also been sanded to 220G. Also, be certain to apply your clear coat(s) because that can change the look of the completed project. It is a pain, but you really need to go through your entire finishing schedule with each sample.

I think you really need to apply the two different colors in two separate steps, but I have been wrong before. FWIW

-- Art

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1056 posts in 1451 days


#4 posted 01-22-2015 05:50 AM

Sanding to 220 will be fine – I usually sand 320 after raising the grain for WB dye. Here are a couple of things you could try on scrap:

1. Apply stain let dry
2. Seal stain (I would use flake shellac)
3. Use a bronze pigment in a glaze (I use Golden Acrylic Glazing Liquid with Golden Fluid Acrylics pigment – any acrylic paint will work with an acrylic glaze). Wipe off and see if enough stays in the grain.
4. Seal the glaze (shellac)
5. topcoat

Another option might be to just substitute thinned bronze paint (WB acrylic) for the glaze. If that doesn’t work, you could try drywall compound or flour. Seal the stain, use a brush to apply the drywall compound or flour, brushing into all the negative grain, apply the glaze or thinned paint and wipe around, coloring and pushing the “filler” into the grain, then wipe off. Have a spray bottle of water ready if it starts to set up before you wipe it off. Good Luck!

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

986 posts in 2104 days


#5 posted 01-22-2015 06:05 AM

+1 osuss

This LINK somwhat shows the process where you would use bronze pigment in your glaze.

-- Respectfully, Paul

View Deanna's profile

Deanna

29 posts in 720 days


#6 posted 01-22-2015 02:02 PM

Awesome responses and thank you for the link. I have seen it before and had been searching for it. Thank you.

Sounds impossible to get the earlywood (grain pattern) to hold the bronze rather than the latewood. I’m going to play and see what happens.

No sanding between sealing stain and brushing drywall/flour?
Powder form no water added to drywall/flour?

This sounds like fun!!

I do appreciate you pros so very much! Thank you thank you thank you!

View Deanna's profile

Deanna

29 posts in 720 days


#7 posted 01-23-2015 12:20 AM

None of the above (and a few more) worked.

Can I get more info on this drywall flour thing? I tried pouncing wet drywall, wiping off excess but that didn’t turn out.

I’m thinking of staining with an amber (golden sorta bronze) , seal coat, few coats bronze walnut wiping stain (may add some walnut tints all to get it darker), then topping it. I just don’t want to loose the grain!

Responses requested and appreciated. Kind of a dummy here and appreciate the knowledge more than you know.

Thanks!

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

986 posts in 2104 days


#8 posted 01-23-2015 05:24 AM

This LINK somewhat explains how you use the drywall compound to fill the pores of the oak.. You will color the drywall compound with your gold/bronze coloring, make sure it is water based as drywall compound is water based.

-- Respectfully, Paul

View Deanna's profile

Deanna

29 posts in 720 days


#9 posted 01-24-2015 10:02 PM

I got it. I stained a few coats with a bronze walnut wiping stain. I then used my finger on a small amount of mineral spirits on a rag and selectively removed some of the stain from the inside of prominent grain I wanted emphasized and stained those areas with a honey maple. Once the finish went on, it popped beautifully! Thanks for all the support you guys. Its a bronze, walnut and golden beauty!

View Deanna's profile

Deanna

29 posts in 720 days


#10 posted 02-01-2015 08:29 PM

Thanks again for all the help! You guys are my heroes!!!

View Deanna's profile

Deanna

29 posts in 720 days


#11 posted 02-01-2015 09:00 PM

Ready for the designer’s finishing touches including wall paper and a huge crystal chandelier! Fun project!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com