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Terminology for 'matched wood grain'?

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Forum topic by phxphun posted 01-21-2015 07:54 PM 621 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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phxphun

3 posts in 687 days


01-21-2015 07:54 PM

Simple question I hope…

I’m writing a paper and just need to know if there is a specific term for designing cabinetry with door panels where the wood grain of each panel is purposefully ‘matched’, such that a bank of cabinet doors all have a very similar grain cross-section… from the same board.

Is there a name for wood panels done deliberately like this or this technique? (In the world of stone slabs, I think they call it ‘bookmarking’ or ‘bookmarked slabs’).


6 replies so far

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Ocelot

1471 posts in 2104 days


#1 posted 01-21-2015 07:57 PM

I’m not sure what you mean. Sometimes people use “bookmatched” boards, which are simply two boards sliced off the same log in sequence, joined in such a way that they look like a mirror image of each other.

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newwoodbutcher

552 posts in 2316 days


#2 posted 01-21-2015 08:09 PM

I think it’s called continuous figure or grain lay out

-- Ken

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phxphun

3 posts in 687 days


#3 posted 01-21-2015 08:52 PM



I m not sure what you mean. Sometimes people use “bookmatched” boards, which are simply two boards sliced off the same log in sequence, joined in such a way that they look like a mirror image of each other.

- Ocelot


Thanks Ocelot. Yes, that is the look I’m trying to pin down the terminology for. ‘Bookmatched’ was the word I should have used.

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phxphun

3 posts in 687 days


#4 posted 01-21-2015 08:59 PM



I think it s called continuous figure or grain lay out

- newwoodbutcher


Thanks newwoodbutcher. ‘Continuous figure’ and ‘grain layout’ are helpful also.

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Ocelot

1471 posts in 2104 days


#5 posted 01-23-2015 07:09 PM

I like bookmatching – and since I’ve had a bandsaw, I’ve played around with it. I’ve got several boards that are not part of any project just bookmatched for fun lying around the shop.

The critical thing is to remove as little wood as possible separating the two halves and surfacing the wood. The less you remove, the more exact the bookmatch (so called, because it’s as if you opened the log like a book). If you can get a very clear resaw of a board with a thin bandsaw blade, and need little plaining and sanding, you can get a great result.

-Paul

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jmartel

6575 posts in 1616 days


#6 posted 01-23-2015 07:14 PM

Bookmatching is where you lay them out such that one is a mirror image of another. Slip matching is where they look the same but just slipped next to each other. Continuous grain is where it looks like one board, but the doors and drawers are cut out and allowed to move.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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