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Delta 37-190 Jointer Startup Problems

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Forum topic by JamieK posted 01-21-2015 07:16 PM 1196 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JamieK

6 posts in 689 days


01-21-2015 07:16 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jointer startup centrifugal switch delta 37-190

Hello everyone. I’m new to the forum here and am currently building a home woodshop after almost 15 years in the building industry. Thanks to all for offering such a great collaborative resource for woodworkers.

I recently purchased a Delta 37-190 from someone in my neighborhood. I probably paid too much (300) but I found that there were so few available options at this medium level of tool that this would be much better than a small bench top model. The tool is in immaculate condition and when running it works beautifully. The problem is with initial startup. When the tool is first turned on, it slowly struggles for up to ten seconds or more to power the motor. When I use an extension cord, or plug it into a 15 amp circuit rather than a 20, it actually blows the breaker and fails to start. Once the tool gets running, it runs completely fine and does not slow or stop even when removing a good amount of material. When it is turned on again right after it has been running, it seems to start up without a struggle at all. Once the machine is left alone for 30 minutes, it has the same problem again.

When I bought the tool, the former owner showed me this problem, and told me that it was solely due to the undersized and outdated electrical panel in his house. He told me that if it was run on an exclusive circuit with ample power, it would not have this issue. He also said he would take it back if I had a problem. I am running the tool on an exclusive 110v 20 amp circuit, and am still having the problem. It seems to me that this should not be happening with this tool, and that it could be a problem with the “centrifugal switch” as I have noticed mentioned in other topics here. I verified that it is wired for 110 and not 220.

Does it sound possible that this problem is really due to a lack of initial power available to the machine, or is it likely that the machine needs more power because of a problem with the motor? If so, how difficult is it to open the motor and attempt to restore the centrifugal switch? I have tried cleaning and oiling what I can without taking the motor apart. My big fear is that in a few months, it will not start at all and I will be stuck paying to replace the motor. If this is really simply due to a lack of power and no fault of the motor, I am fine with that. If I need to restore, repair, or replace something, I am tempted to bring it back to him rather than deal with the hassle. He seemed like a genuine guy so I’m hoping he will honor his word. I would likely buy a Ridgid JP-0610. I appreciate any comments and expertise anyone has to offer.


17 replies so far

View Richard H's profile

Richard H

489 posts in 1148 days


#1 posted 01-21-2015 07:31 PM

I don’t think this is a power issue. I own a open stand version of this 6” jointer and have no issues running it off a 15 amp circuit with extension cord. It spins up quickly. If I recall correctly the motor is only 3/4 HP.

View Sawdustonmyshoulder's profile

Sawdustonmyshoulder

413 posts in 3096 days


#2 posted 01-21-2015 07:37 PM

Check the start capacitor on the motor. About 5 – 10 dollars. Be careful of capacitors tho. They hold electricity that can KILL YOU so discharge the capacitor before you try to disassemble the unit.

-- Makin' Sawdust!!!

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4247 posts in 1666 days


#3 posted 01-21-2015 08:33 PM

Yup.. start capacitor or centrifugal switch are the most likely culprits.. both an easy fix.. The cap can be tested with a normal multimeter. The switch can sometimes get sawdust or other contaminants between it’s contacts and keep it from closing, so I’d first try using some compressed air to blow it out.. if that doesn’t work, then you need to crack open the motor to check/clean it.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

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JamieK

6 posts in 689 days


#4 posted 01-21-2015 10:01 PM

Wow -Thanks for all of the fast responses guys! It sounds unanimous that a good cleaning of the centrifugal switch or replacement of the capacitor is in order to get this working correctly. I think rather than lug the 200lb machine out of the basement to return it I will take a shot at fixing the issue and hopefully educate myself along the way. If it gets it back running smoothly it will be worth the effort. I’m thinking I will start with the centrifugal, and if that doesn’t work I’ll move on to the capacitor. I plan on taking some photos to document this process, as it seems others have had similar issues with this machine – maybe it will help someone down the road.

Thanks again,
Jamie

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MrUnix

4247 posts in 1666 days


#5 posted 01-21-2015 10:08 PM

I would check the capacitor first.. usually it’s mounted outside the motor and just requires removing a couple screws to get the cover off, and you can test it in place by unplugging the leads. In some rare instances, it’s mounted externally away from the motor which makes it even easier.. If it’s mounted internally, then it doesn’t matter much since you will have to open up the motor either way.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View JamieK's profile

JamieK

6 posts in 689 days


#6 posted 01-21-2015 10:16 PM

Brad- Thanks for the tip! I will check the assembly diagrams to see where the capacitor is located before I start pulling the motor apart. Looks like there is plenty of online direction for testing these. If anyone knows the start capacitor location on this model, feel free to chime in.

Thanks,
Jamie

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MrUnix

4247 posts in 1666 days


#7 posted 01-22-2015 12:04 AM

If anyone knows the start capacitor location on this model, feel free to chime in.

Would need to know what motor you have first :)

Any number of motors could be installed, and it may not even have a capacitor, just start windings operated off the centrifugal switch. Model number or pictures would help greatly.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View JamieK's profile

JamieK

6 posts in 689 days


#8 posted 01-22-2015 01:25 AM

Hi –
So here is an update. Unfortunately I don’t have any pictures because the camera was out of batteries. At this point I’m 99% ready to return this to the guy I bought it from. Luckily he has been responsive to my texts today regarding problems with the machine.

I began by looking for the start capacitor. I found a removable casing on the side of the motor and unscrewed it to find what appeared to be a cylindrical capacitor about 5” long. It was soldered to the connections so I decided to put it back and only remove if necessary. I next decided to open the motor to look for problems affecting the centrifugal switch. I removed the belt and pulley and then took the end cap off of the motor. I noticed the centrifugal mechanism had components both inside the motor and also attached to the inside of the end cap. Two soldered wires prevented the cap from coming all the way off. I also noticed almost zero dust or debris in there, the switch looked clean. Regardless, I blew out the area and pushed the ring in a few times in case it had been stuck. The springs moved freely. I closed the motor back up and put it back together.

To my surprise, I flipped the switch and the motor started right up with no issue. I thought the problem was solved initially, but immediately noticed that it sounded much louder than before. After a few starts and stops, I began to notice a bit of smoke and immediately killed it. The casing around the blue capacitor was burning hot, and remained hot for at least an hour afterwards. It seems to me that the problem is almost reversed, and now the machine does not switch to the running mode, but stays in startup mode. Does this sound correct?

I feel that fixing this machine is now beyond my expertise and I fear that if I keep messing with it the original owner may not take it back. Does anyone have any idea what happened here, and what might be the problem now?
I don’t trust this motor at all any longer, and it does not seem to be made in a way that makes it easy to take apart and replace parts. Although I’m bent on returning it right now, I’d still be interested to hear thoughts on what is going wrong.

Thanks!

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1188 days


#9 posted 01-22-2015 01:53 AM

It sounds like you didn’t destroy the motor, but came close. If the centrifugal switch is reassembled incorrectly or even if one of the contacts is a little sprung it can cause the motor to malfunction. If the motor’s centrifugal switch was initially stuck in the run position and not returning to the start position when dropping below a certain rpm it wouldn’t be able to spin at all from a dead stop, even with the belt removed, it would just hum, draw a lot of power and get hot. It sounds like the capacitor is almost certainly the problem. The motor is most likely salvageable and if you’re not comfortable doing it yourself, you could probably still save money by having someone else take a look at it before completely replacing the motor.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7225 posts in 2843 days


#10 posted 01-22-2015 10:35 AM

It’s possible, and even likely that the cap is bad….not an open circuit, but damaged. You should be able to replace the cap for~ $10, less if you find a surplus store. It’s not imperative that the capacitance value be exact…within 25% is easily close enough, but be sure the voltage values are at least what’s stated, and the physical size fits.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View JamieK's profile

JamieK

6 posts in 689 days


#11 posted 01-23-2015 09:52 PM

Update for anyone interested. I went down and checked on it yesterday after letting it cool down for a day and guess what!? It’s back to the same slow startup as before, and blew the breaker again. I contacted the original owner and he is going to come by and see what he can do to try and repair the jointer. He wants to try to grease the bearings, and if that doesn’t work he said he will take it back, which is a relief. It seems the capacitor is the most likely issue but at this point I guess he has a right to come by and see what he can do before giving up and taking it back, so I’ll respect his efforts. I don’t think he will go so far as to want to experiment with unsoldering, testing, and replacing the capacitor and to be honest, neither do I (now that he is giving me a way out). By the way – the capacitor does not seem to have any markings that would help identify the replacement, it’s just ‘blue’. I wonder if Delta was not intending to make this motor simple to repair? I ‘d rather spend my time making things with wood, not messing with machinery and electricity. I am looking at shifting that $300 towards a Grizzly bench top unit, or perhaps even one of their larger models. Anyone have any experience with that smaller unit or other Grizzly’s? I’m sure it has been discussed on here, so I will take a look.

Thanks!

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4247 posts in 1666 days


#12 posted 01-23-2015 10:04 PM

All you need to test the capacitor is a multimeter.. snip one lead and test in place. If it’s bad, you would have to snip the lead anyway to replace it. Should take all of about a minute to do.. maybe 5 if you use a soldering iron as they take a while to heat up :)

Cheers,
Brad

PS: You can check the bearings by removing the belt and spinning the motor.. although, unless they are really, really bad and gunked up, I doubt that is the source of your problem. Re-greasing them would involve taking them out, removing the seals (unless they are open bearings) and cleaning them completely by soaking in a solvent first. Would be much easier (and probably better in the long run) to just replace them if needed.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View jakep_82's profile

jakep_82

105 posts in 1773 days


#13 posted 01-23-2015 10:55 PM

It’s almost certainly the capacitor, which as others have mentioned is a simple and inexpensive fix. Greasing the bearings is not going to fix it.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2192 posts in 1493 days


#14 posted 01-24-2015 01:43 AM

I got a well-used motor, and blew the capacitor while testing it. Also, there was no wiring diagram and the wires were all numbered rather than color coded. I’d never seen that before. I took it to a local electrical shop, and the woman behind the counter yanked the old capacitor out, got a replacement off the shelf, and wired it up correctly. Took her all of 5 minutes, and cost me $17.

I am sure it’s your capacitor. As jakep says, the bearings aren’t the problem. If you don’t keep this jointer, don’t waste your money on a benchtop. Too short, unless you only plan to do boards 2 feet long or less. And the universal motor will make it annoyingly loud.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View daddywoofdawg's profile

daddywoofdawg

1010 posts in 1042 days


#15 posted 01-24-2015 02:00 AM

If you don’t want to do it take it down to a motor shop shouldn’t cost much to get fixed.and have a better joiner than a benchtop.

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