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bow bar - chainsaw attachment

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Forum topic by HokieMojo posted 1944 days ago 20886 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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HokieMojo

2097 posts in 2329 days


1944 days ago

i saw an add for a chainsaw that includes a bowbar. the picture isn’t good and I can’t tell what its used for or how. Does anyone know much about these? I’m jsut askign out of curiousity.


24 replies so far

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GMman

3902 posts in 2298 days


#1 posted 1944 days ago

Do you have the picture

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DaleM

901 posts in 1985 days


#2 posted 1944 days ago

I have heard that they kick back a lot which makes sense because the tip of the bar and the area just on the top of the tip cause the most kickback, so the smaller the end of the bar, the less kickback in general, and the bow gives you a huge danger area on the end of the bar.

-- Dale Manning, Carthage, NY

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marcb

762 posts in 2274 days


#3 posted 1944 days ago

Just say no to bow bars, don’t really bring anything to the game except a certain danger.

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HokieMojo

2097 posts in 2329 days


#4 posted 1944 days ago

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DaleM

901 posts in 1985 days


#5 posted 1944 days ago

HokieMojo, as for the how it works, it goes on just like the regular bar. Here is a picture of one I found on the saw. It does look cool. http://i234.photobucket.com/albums/ee127/leeha1959/HomeliteSuperWiz66003.jpg

-- Dale Manning, Carthage, NY

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HokieMojo

2097 posts in 2329 days


#6 posted 1943 days ago

I wonder why you would want this wierd shape instead of the usual bar shape.

View snowdog's profile

snowdog

1132 posts in 2583 days


#7 posted 1943 days ago

Scary looking chain saw. I think I will stick with what I grew up on. I went to a saw mill museum in NE PA last year and saw a lot of these from the old days.

-- "so much to learn and so little time"..

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David Hanna

2 posts in 1402 days


#8 posted 1402 days ago

The bow blade was popular in the southeast in the pulpwood industry. It is a very aggressive attachment best used for smaller logs up to 24” in a horizontal position below the operator’s waste. They are intended for high volume cross-cutting applications where logs are lying on the ground. Bow blades work well in pine and other soft woods. Gear drive saws such as the Poulan “Super 72” which provide low chain speed with high torque were common in this application. A bow blade with sharp chain goes through pine fast! Direct drive saws, even with a bow blade, work better hard wood such as oak because of the greater chain speed and less torque. High torque from the big gear drive saws in hard wood makes the chain get hot and dull in a hurry.

If you are prone to accidents, stay away from the bow saw or you will end up in the emergency room! You do not want to use a bow saw in thick brush where there are many small springy branches in close quarters that the chain can catch on. Contrary to an unfounded impression that many people have, the bow blade is not a good or safe tool for clearing small standing bush! You can lose a chunk of your face in such conditions with a bow saw. The bow catches on every thing it bumps into and torque of a gear drive saw makes matters worse.

In the 70’s, I ran model 54, Super 68, and Super 72 Poulans with bow blades in clearing operations near Houston. We would take the tree down with a 955 track loader. I would cut the stump off, limb the tree, and then cut off the top. The dozer would then move the log to a location where the pulpwood hauler would cut it up with his bow saw into 4’ lengths or into saleable logs of other desired lengths. You are good with your bow saw or any saw when a dozer never has to assist in getting your saw out of a bind. The bow blade is easy to pinch in the big stuff. However, the bow blade has advantages on smaller diameter stuff. I cut up dozens of trees up to 3’ d.b.h. in one day with a bow saw and have vivid memories of cutting off a few of those stumps 35 years later. Not all of the big ones were straight or lay neatly on their sides! You develop skills that these tree care company guys you see now could never imagine. It was insane…

-- M. David Hanna

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JJohnston

1577 posts in 1892 days


#9 posted 1401 days ago

Based on what 65jetstar says, and the super-thin lower section of the bar, my guess is that it’s less likely to get pinched in the cut than a conventional bar. If the log does pinch, it just pinches on the “donut hole”.

-- "Sorry I'm late. Somebody tampered with my brakes." "You should have been early, then."

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newbiewoodworker

668 posts in 1428 days


#10 posted 1401 days ago

Yikes… that thing looks like something out of a horror movie.. made for chopping up zombies…

I think Ill just stick with the standard bar…

-- "Ah, So your not really a newbie, but a I betterbie."

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David Hanna

2 posts in 1402 days


#11 posted 1401 days ago

It depends on your application! A big gear drive saw with a bow blade can do jobs in a way that could not be approached by any other type of saw. At 17 years old, I could cut up a dozen 24” trees lying on the ground with one of these dudes and be on my break before most guys would be half finished. They do not make the big gear drive saws any more, but I believe you can still buy a bow blade for some of the bigger saws on the market today. They are for professional use and many dealers will not touch them. If you lived in the south and were in the pulp wood business 40 years ago, this is what you would have been using. The Super 68 that I am running is about 80 cc, weighs over 20 pounds, and has no muffler. The Super 72 was about 90 cc. You could see the piston looking back at you through the exhaust port. Listening to that popping and barking for 10 hours will have your ears ringing.

-- M. David Hanna

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HokieMojo

2097 posts in 2329 days


#12 posted 1399 days ago

so they won’t be making an attachment for my remington electric saw anytime soon? Haha. I don’t remember what the seller wanted for it, but I haven’t seen one before or since that ad and I check CL often.

View MoralOrel's profile

MoralOrel

3 posts in 953 days


#13 posted 953 days ago

Some fairly bizarre applications are mentioned here for the use of a bow bar on a chainsaw… YES, I know this post is old as the hills but for accuracy and safety I feel compelled to update this post. A chainsaw bow guide bar is used for brush cutting, the smaller in diameter the better.

In our camp if you were caught bucking wood over about 4” in diameter with the “bow saw” you carried in the fuel for everyone the next day. Quite the task as I’m old enough we didn’t have four-wheelers and the like so you could hike quite a ways with the steel jerrys (steel jerry cans).

The bow saw had its use in the day but bucking wood over eight inches in diameter was unheard of as despite the length of the chain the formation of the bar itself allowed for only very shallow penetration.. Take a look at the picture and imagine trying to cut any thing of much diameter with it Many of the bow bars had a, well I guess it would be called a guard about 6” from the tip. This ran almost the rest of the length of the bar toward the drive end.
Another way to explain the use of these is 99% of the cutting was done with only the first 4” of the bar. I do not believe you can buy a new bow bar anywhere

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chrisstef

10413 posts in 1607 days


#14 posted 953 days ago

wouldnt.touch.it

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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MoralOrel

3 posts in 953 days


#15 posted 949 days ago

@ cr1 your “Cutting Christmas trees” comment about made me spit out my coffee! Not sure if you were serious, but gave me a heck of a chuckle either way! I never liked using the bow saw for any horizontal cutting, nor vertical for that matter! They were just never something I learned to like nor trust.

But, speaking of Christmas trees, I saw a Christmas tree “wrapping” machine in action yesterday! Not at all what I imagined them to be like. (it was the wire type not the netting type) Cool none the less!

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