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Quick Table Saw Dust Collection Question

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Forum topic by SuperCubber posted 01-20-2015 01:38 PM 992 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SuperCubber

868 posts in 1745 days


01-20-2015 01:38 PM

Hey guys/gals,

I’m getting ready to add some DC to my contractor style table saw. I was planning on building some sort of enclosure for beneath the saw and attaching a hose from my Dust Deputy. Then, I started wondering if I actually need an enclosure, or if I can just add a bottom to the saw with a port for the hose? Obviously, adding the bottom is much quicker and easier.

Any opinions on this?

Thanks!

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine


10 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile (online now)

Fred Hargis

3930 posts in 1954 days


#1 posted 01-20-2015 01:44 PM

I just stuck a ready made flange for a 4” connection to the bottom of my Delta. It was large enough to cover the hole that was in that cabinet. I also enclosed the motor, though. I tried a few ways of doing this, including hardwood baffles that just fit around the motor bracket and belts, they had to be removed when I did a bevel cut. That changed to a complete enclosure that was hanging on the outfeed table. The downside to that was that the outfeed table had to remain in place, so I couldn’t roll the saw back out of the way anymore….but it worked a lot better.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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hotbyte

841 posts in 2436 days


#2 posted 01-20-2015 01:53 PM

Right now, I just have one of the flanges Fred described in bottom of my Sears contractor saw. It does OK but I really need to seal around back. I’ve seen various magnetic sheets used that could be removed when tilting blade for bevel cuts I might try.

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crank49

3980 posts in 2432 days


#3 posted 01-20-2015 03:59 PM

Any bottom enclosure would help. A bottom sloped to the rear with a hose connection at the lowest point works even better.
BUT, the biggest issue is enclosing the motor or back with opening for the belt(s). Hard to do but very important.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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Rick Dennington

5173 posts in 2655 days


#4 posted 01-20-2015 05:41 PM

Why not just build a saw cabinet..? If you saw is still on the favtory legs, you can remove them, build a cabinet with drawers and storage, and have an opening in the cabinet for the dust and chips to fall into…..Then when it gets full, just pull out the drawer, empty it, and slide it back in…..I did this years ago with an old Craftsman saw I had…Completely refubed it….Take a look at my Blog called “A new look for an old Workhose”.....You’ll see how I did it, and read how I did it….Best thing I ever did for that old saw…It’s a 1985 I bought brand new…....

-- At my age, an "all--nighter" is not having to get up and pee...!!!

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SuperCubber

868 posts in 1745 days


#5 posted 01-20-2015 06:45 PM

Thanks guys!

Michael, this is a direct drive, so no motor hanging out the back. I will do my best to seal up most of the holes though.

Rick, I have thought about building a cabinet, but frankly, this saw isn’t worth it. It will probably be replaced by the time I can find the time to build a cabinet!

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

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Tenfingers58

96 posts in 2139 days


#6 posted 01-20-2015 08:34 PM

I’m confused as to why people want to “seal up” their tools when adding dust collection to them.

It seems to me if the cabinet is sealed, no air in = no air out.

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hotbyte

841 posts in 2436 days


#7 posted 01-20-2015 09:06 PM



I m confused as to why people want to “seal up” their tools when adding dust collection to them.

It seems to me if the cabinet is sealed, no air in = no air out.

- Tenfingers58


My thought is you want as much of the “air in” as possible to come from around blade and insert. There will still be some other opening such as slot for the front handle.

View Fred Hargis's profile (online now)

Fred Hargis

3930 posts in 1954 days


#8 posted 01-20-2015 09:28 PM

You don’t want to seal the cabinet. The attempt at closing the back on the saws with belt drive is to redirect the air flow somewhat so it catches more of the dust. It is not to seal it off. If you have a direct drive saw, then you don’t need to do anything…..someone else mentioned it you need the air moving though there.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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SuperCubber

868 posts in 1745 days


#9 posted 01-20-2015 10:31 PM

I appreciate all the input, guys!

I didn’t seal it all off, but I did close off 3 openings at the very bottom of the base, where it contacts the “new” bottom. I had to wrap up just as I finished attaching it, but I’ll let you know how it works when I get back out there, hopefully tonight!

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

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crank49

3980 posts in 2432 days


#10 posted 01-21-2015 01:10 AM

It’s a matter of air flow volume and velocity.
The manual of industrial ventilation which many environmental engineers use as a reference to design hoods and ducts lists ideal airflow velocities for just about every type and size of machine you could imagine.
It is the goal of dust collection to capture particles released from the various machines at velocities created by the action of the machines.

A table saw cuts pieces of wood off of a board with teeth on a blade spinning at a given speed. This can be calculated from the RPM and the diameter of the blade. To collect those particles you need air flow across the blade fast enough to pull those suckers into the duct and not let them go sailing across the room. the collector has a finite volume of air it can handle and every opening in the saw cabinet that lets air get sucked in reduces the amount of air going past the blade.

Every machine has its own requirements and problems. There is no fixed rule that solves all problems, but generally you want to not let air into a system anywhere it is not serving to help capture or transport dust.

-- Michael: Hillary has a long list of accomplishments, though most DAs would refer to them as felonies.

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