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Help with Federal Card Table Inlay

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Forum topic by DT2 posted 01-19-2015 03:46 PM 907 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DT2

11 posts in 686 days


01-19-2015 03:46 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Hello, first time poster here, I hope I am posting in the right section. I need a little help with a Federal card table I am hoping to build. My question is how would I go about inlaying the apron? See this link for an example of what I mean (http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/4010/federal-card-table). I have no problem with stringing or inlay on a flat surface, but I’m not sure where to start for a curved surface. Should I create an 1/8 veneer, add inlay / stringing / veneer, then glue that to the bricklaid substrate? Or would it be better to do it after it is all assembled? Thanks for the replies!


9 replies so far

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sfrobk

18 posts in 294 days


#1 posted 02-15-2016 04:24 AM

Hi DT2,
I’m building a Federal Card Table myself, and built up the veneer and inlay on the apron from the center, out. So first I veneered (with hide glue, it’s reversible!) the entire apron with mahogany, cut away everything but the center panels I wanted, and removed the outer veneers with water (sprayed) and a warm iron to reliquify the hide glue and release the pieces to be removed. Then a glued in a 1/16” holly stringing around those center panels, and crotch mahogany around the holly. Last, I routed two, 1/16” recesses along the bottom of the apron to receive two more holly strings, and hide glued those in last. Here’s what I ended up with: https://woodworkingprojs.shutterfly.com/pictures/95. Make sense?

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DT2

11 posts in 686 days


#2 posted 02-15-2016 04:36 AM


Hi DT2,
I m building a Federal Card Table myself, and built up the veneer and inlay on the apron from the center, out. So first I veneered (with hide glue, it s reversible!) the entire apron with mahogany, cut away everything but the center panels I wanted, and removed the outer veneers with water (sprayed) and a warm iron to reliquify the hide glue and release the pieces to be removed. Then a glued in a 1/16” holly stringing around those center panels, and crotch mahogany around the holly. Last, I routed two, 1/16” recesses along the bottom of the apron to receive two more holly strings, and hide glued those in last. Here s what I ended up with: https://woodworkingprojs.shutterfly.com/pictures/95. Make sense?

- sfrobk

Thanks for the reply, I posted the question around a year ago so I ended up just going with my gut and I think it turned out nice. What I ended up doing is gluing some shop sawn 1/16 mahogany veneer and then inlaying afterwards on the curved surface. It wasn’t too difficult, here’s an album of the finished product (http://imgur.com/a/9vlWf). I also used hide glue, I’m not sure why it isn’t more widespread, it cleans up really easily and being reversible it has saved me once in the past!

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sfrobk

18 posts in 294 days


#3 posted 02-15-2016 04:53 AM

Your link didn’t work for me; is it protected? Ditto about hide glue; perhaps it’s not as marketable as expensive veneer presses, bags, vacuums, etc… I love the stuff, though my kids don’t care for the smell!

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DT2

11 posts in 686 days


#4 posted 02-15-2016 05:00 AM



Your link didn t work for me; is it protected? Ditto about hide glue; perhaps it s not as marketable as expensive veneer presses, bags, vacuums, etc… I love the stuff, though my kids don t care for the smell!

- sfrobk

I’m not sure what’s wrong with the link, if I open it from the comment it doesn’t work but if I paste it in a separate tab it does. Try this

http://imgur.com/gallery/9vlWf

If you can load it, let me know what you think. That piece was made almost entirely with hide glue, although I personally like the TB liquid hide glue because it has all of the benefits (except the super quick grab of hot hide) and as a bonus it doesn’t require mixing.

View OggieOglethorpe's profile

OggieOglethorpe

1211 posts in 1572 days


#5 posted 02-15-2016 12:30 PM

In the FWW example, I’d make up (fit and veneer tape) each panel with the center and edge veneer, without stringing, vacuum press them or hammer veneer in place with hot hide, and let dry. I’d make the fans up ahead of time, as one assembly each. I have a bag, so personally, I wouldn’t bother hammering them. If you don’t have a bag, you’re pretty much stuck with hot hide and a hammer.

Liquid hide will not work nearly as well on the curved surface as hot hide, if at all. You need the grab…

I’d then inlay the previously made fans using a radius cutter to slice the semi-circles, or a template and the Dremel / StewMac base combo.

Next, I’d cut the stringing grooves with either a Dremel and StewMac router base with a SAPFM / Latta end mill installed, or a hand cutter, and glue in the stringing. Waiting ‘till now lets the stringing grooves clean up the intersections with the veneer orientation and fan edges. You can adjust the groove for a press fit.

Last, I would rout the edge grove with a trim router and edge guide and install the banding.

The curve simply means to have to stop the power tools early, and to a little more handwork in the corners. You still have a straight reference along the long sides. I’d probably do the short sides by hand, but you could also hot glue some shims to the StewMac base to prevent it from rocking.

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shipwright

7167 posts in 2260 days


#6 posted 02-15-2016 02:41 PM

Also FWW I’d likely hammer veneer it and cut in the stringing all at the same time.

Also your link includes the second parenthesis. If you remove it it should work.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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OggieOglethorpe

1211 posts in 1572 days


#7 posted 02-15-2016 05:53 PM

Ditto about hide glue; perhaps it’s not as marketable as expensive veneer presses, bags, vacuums, etc…

Two different approaches to a similar conclusion, with one important difference… The reversibility and short working time of hot hide makes it not great for certain applications, like kitchens and bathrooms, or large panels. That can be a plus for hobby work, as you get an undo button…

If you maintain control of the item and know exactly where it will go and how it’ll be used, hot hide is great. It’s not good to veneer a panel and find out that steam from a kettle, slow cooker, or bathroom moisture delaminated your work. This goes double or triple if someone paid for the work, or you created custom panels for someone else.

Vacuum presses can also do bent lamination and are super for curved face work without having to make special double sided molds. The pumps can be used for other things, too, like clamping work in place to machines, benches, or in jigs.

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sfrobk

18 posts in 294 days


#8 posted 11-01-2016 11:12 PM

Hi again DT2,
I’m back at it with my card table, with more questions about yours, which looks spectacular btw. Sorry for not commenting earlier…
How did you install your hinges? I’m a few weeks away from this step myself but am trying to get ahead of it. Other than screwing up a bunch of scrap which I plan to do, did you learn anything from your install? Thanks!

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DT2

11 posts in 686 days


#9 posted 11-02-2016 01:51 AM



Hi again DT2,
I m back at it with my card table, with more questions about yours, which looks spectacular btw. Sorry for not commenting earlier…
How did you install your hinges? I m a few weeks away from this step myself but am trying to get ahead of it. Other than screwing up a bunch of scrap which I plan to do, did you learn anything from your install? Thanks!

- sfrobk

Hello,

Hinge installation: I’m going to write it up as steps as that is easiest for me

1. make 2 blocks (3/4” thick is fine, but a little thicker is better) roughly 6×6
2. cut a profile into the 2 blocks that is equal to the profile of the edge of the card table where the hinges will be installed (these blocks are just to support the router)
3. mark with a knife the layout of the hinges.
4. next clamp the 2 blocks from earlier to the card table and make sure they are flush, this will make it so the router cannot “rock” off the surface at all
5. route close to the knife lines, finish with the chisel same as a standard hinge
6. you will need to route a little deeper at the back to accommodate the hinge design (probably, depends on the hinge I guess)
7. with mortise cut, bend the hinge L> do this by holding the hinge in a vice and tapping with a hammer or pulling on it with some pliers, make sure you grab the leaf with the same side that is held in the vise so as not to damage the center “hinging pin”
8. predrill holes and install

Overall probably the trickest part to the project and I highly recommend you fully install the hinges from start to finish in a piece of scrap since the router can mess things up quick

Hope that was clear enough, and send me some photos when its done!

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