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buying different lathe chucks

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Forum topic by 3285jeff posted 01-19-2015 02:12 AM 875 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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3285jeff

152 posts in 1184 days


01-19-2015 02:12 AM

Well after a long wait I decided to get the Nova g3 chuck. I’m waiting on it to arrive now but I have notice that a lot of turners buy more than one chuck rather than change jaws;;;which would be best;;;buy utility chucks and not have to change jaws or change the jaws on a good one;;;I would love to hear a few woodturners comments. Thank you


8 replies so far

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3129 days


#1 posted 01-19-2015 03:10 AM

Changing jaws is a PITA … eventually you will want more than one chuck so you can have, for example, your #2 jaws on one chuck and your pins jaws on another. That’s why I have two G3’s and a PSI Utility chuck.

There is nothing special about the PSI Utility chuck (or any other so-called ‘utility’ chuck) ... it still has different jaw sets that are installed with one or two hex flat head screws, just like any other scroll chuck. BTW, some folks have reported having trouble getting replacement set screws for the PSI Utility chuck (they are easy to lose … don’t ask me how I know!).

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

271 posts in 767 days


#2 posted 01-19-2015 04:39 AM

I think you will like the G3. I would rather have a good chuck than several “utility” chucks. They are what keeps that blank from orbiting.
But the G3 is not a very much more than others.
I have been turning 5+ years and do not like to change jaws so I have acquired several (4 G3’s, 1 SN2, and 2 SN).
I would not have bought so many but most came up as wuttenbuts on the bay.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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3285jeff

152 posts in 1184 days


#3 posted 05-03-2015 01:22 PM

well I broke down and bought the infinity chuck by nova,,it is really sweet,,i can change the jaws I believe quicker than you can change the chucks off the lathe,,it is a little pricey,,but having a lot of chucks is not what I wanted,,if anyone feels like I do,,i suggest the infinity chuck,,and it is cheaper than the easy chuck,,

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Wildwood

1886 posts in 1601 days


#4 posted 05-03-2015 01:50 PM

Buying extra jaw sets least expensive over buying another new chuck!

Most turning vendors also sell extra replacement jaw screws, but don’t help if broke off a jaw screw and unable to extract that broken screw. That is why bought my second chuck body & spigot jaws!

Except for holding smaller items jaws that came with my chuck & screw center can handle 80% of what I turn. 2nd chuck, drive centers, and faceplates take up the slack!

-- Bill

View saddlenow's profile

saddlenow

12 posts in 1610 days


#5 posted 05-03-2015 02:11 PM

Nova has a quick change jaw system that I don’t have, but will consider some day. I have two SN2’s and really like being able to have the smaller jaws and larger jaws ready to go. You will like them both. I had a lot of scrap cherry squares that I glued together and turned a tenon for glue blocks, so that solves a lot of moving stuff around. Also a beall threader works to allow more/different applications if you need several projects on the shelf.
Richard

-- If a nation expects to be ignorant and free ... it expects what never was and never will be-Jefferson

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TheDane

4997 posts in 3129 days


#6 posted 05-03-2015 03:17 PM

Also a beall threader works to allow more/different applications if you need several projects on the shelf.

+1 on that. With a Beall tap, you can make your own faceplates and fixtures. Really comes in handy!

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

4234 posts in 1665 days


#7 posted 05-03-2015 05:13 PM


+1 on that. With a Beall tap, you can make your own faceplates and fixtures. Really comes in handy!

My lathe has an oddball sized spindle (3/4-10), so making my own faceplates, jam chucks, spindle chucks, etc… has allowed me to do all sorts of things that I would have never been able to do – and they don’t cost anything to make using scrap 2x material scrounged out of dumpsters at construction sites :)

Cheers,
Brad

PS: I just use a standard tap – I already had one the proper size in my tap and die set.

-- Brad in FL - To be old and wise, you must first be young and stupid

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7483 posts in 1473 days


#8 posted 05-03-2015 06:13 PM

I’m leaning pretty heavily towards that Nova Infinity. I figure the up-front cost will be worth it in the long run.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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