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Abrasive Water Jet Technology

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Forum topic by poopiekat posted 03-27-2009 06:26 PM 1092 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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poopiekat

4224 posts in 3196 days


03-27-2009 06:26 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Just wondering if anyone has any experience with Abrasive Water Jet Technology. The reason I ask, is that a friend wants to buy a unit for fabricating parts out of titanium and other metals, and I automatically thought about how this technology could be used for fabricating complex wooden shapes.
Imagine a pressure washer, only with 50,000 lbs of pressure, with garnet or silicon oxide bits blasting through a material, leaving clean edges and a .005 kerf! Without dust! It’s really exciting to think how the process could be used for lathe turning or for milling logs too! Plenty of videos on youtube on the subject. The possibilities are endless!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!


13 replies so far

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marcb

768 posts in 3135 days


#1 posted 03-27-2009 07:18 PM

I’ve seen it done first hand, but thats all the experience I have. Just wanted to chip in with “its awesome”

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Karson

35035 posts in 3862 days


#2 posted 03-27-2009 07:36 PM

Interesting prospect.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

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Woodchuck1957

944 posts in 3225 days


#3 posted 03-27-2009 08:04 PM

There is a sheet metal shop intown that I go to that has a pretty good size Waterjet. I’ve seen it work and I’ve seen some stuff it has done, pretty amazeing. I’ve thought about the wood idea too, but I’m not so sure that water would be good for alot of woods, and sand geting into the wood grain probably wouldn’t be a good deal either.

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Kindlingmaker

2656 posts in 2988 days


#4 posted 03-27-2009 08:17 PM

With the amount of water the wood would have I would have my doubts if when redried that the wood would be flat.

-- Never board, always knotty, lots of growth rings

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HokieMojo

2103 posts in 3190 days


#5 posted 03-27-2009 08:30 PM

just based on by esperiences with a preasurewasher on a deck, doesn’t it tend to affect wood grain differently in different spots? the rings seem denser than the gaps between rings. I think you’d get a wierd looking effect. interesting idea.

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marcb

768 posts in 3135 days


#6 posted 03-27-2009 09:04 PM

They use waterjets to cut headliners for at least some OEM car manufacturers. Not sure if everyone has gone that route yet or not.

As the headliner is a fiber/glue mixture with foam and cloth I’m not sure if the water from the jet would be a huge issue on the wood.

View Boardman's profile

Boardman

157 posts in 3223 days


#7 posted 03-27-2009 11:29 PM

I used to do sales for a place that did waterjet cutting. It cut thru 14” of titanium, although the resulting cut was had a lot of washout – the cut edge goes away from perpindicular on the bottom.

We did do some 2” mesquite. Since there’s a lot of backsplash from the 4’ deep water catch tank beneath the cut, we just put it on some sheet metal. But it’s all surface moisture which dries pretty quick. The downside is that it IS NOT cheap, excpet if you’re doing mass production.

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wjMatt

1 post in 2804 days


#8 posted 04-01-2009 05:18 PM

Hi,
My Name is Matt and I work in sales at WARDJet ( www.wardjet.com ) Please feel free to forward my contact info. to your friend that wants to buy a unit for fabricating parts out of titanium and other metals.

Thanks!
Matt 330.677.9100 X42
WARDJet
mgorday@wardjet.com

View bayspt's profile

bayspt

292 posts in 3166 days


#9 posted 04-01-2009 05:51 PM

A previous company I worked for was looking at slicing breads and cakes with a water jet. What you have to look at is the time the water is on and in the material, and how fast that material absorbs water. just my .02

-- Jimmy, Oklahoma "It's a dog-eat-dog world, and I'm wearing milkbone underwear!"

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4224 posts in 3196 days


#10 posted 04-03-2009 01:39 AM

Hopefully, the moderators will remove the post above:

Hi My Name is Matt and I work in sales at WARDJet ( www.xxxxx.com ) Please feel free to forward my contact info. to your friend that wants to buy a unit for fabricating parts out of titanium and other metals.

I’m annoyed that anyone would take advantage of my thread in the hopes of stirring up a little commerce for himself.
Perhaps if he had any idea if whether his products could be applied to woodworking he certainly didn’t seem to want to share them by answering my question. Sorry, I’m just annoyed. Rant over!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1878 posts in 3022 days


#11 posted 04-03-2009 02:20 AM

If we ignore him, maybe he’ll go away.

Doubt if he is a woodworker. Probably was trolling the web and saw the post. This was his only post and he only joined 1 day ago.

Gotta give him a E for effort though – he’s doing what sales guys need to do.

-- Joe

View Boardman's profile

Boardman

157 posts in 3223 days


#12 posted 04-03-2009 02:50 AM

Pinwheel’s got a program that searches “water-jet cutting” or some similar phrase. And he’s using an automated response system – notice how it refrences titanium.

View FEDSAWDAVE's profile

FEDSAWDAVE

293 posts in 2893 days


#13 posted 04-03-2009 03:09 AM

I’ve seen the water jet technology for stone and it is really impressive but i have no clue as to woodworking uses.

-- David, Tools4solidsurface.com

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