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contractor TS motor/blade issue

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Forum topic by Neodogg posted 03-26-2009 05:43 PM 1704 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Neodogg

94 posts in 2893 days


03-26-2009 05:43 PM

Hey, well I working on putting the finishing touches of restoring my g-pa’s old ‘54 craftsman TS. I found the manual because I thought I was doing something wrong when mounting the motor. Once mounted and I raise the blade up, it will raise 1” and then start to “buck” & won’t raise anymore, but if I help move the motor then the blade will raise!? I only have one belt on, it calls for 2, not sure if with only one belt the motor is too heavy? This is my first TS and I guess I can move the motor up when I need to raise the blade, but I had an idea that the TS wouldn’t need manual assistance? Just curious if anyone had any ideas or similar problems?

-- If you can't fix it with a hammer, you've got an electrical problem!


16 replies so far

View Eduardo Rodriguez's profile

Eduardo Rodriguez

37 posts in 2836 days


#1 posted 03-26-2009 05:55 PM

Well, I own a ´94 Craftsman TS, and I remember reading the manual that there is a piece that must be adjusted in the trunion when the mecanism that rise or down the blade slips. In a normal way I´ve seen similar TS with very heavy motors with no trouble. I realize that the trunions and all the parts of your TS heritage must be sturdiest than mine. Check it, (I don´t know if you can see the mecanism true the carcase, other persons rising it while you inspect it must help a lot!!) and if your trouble persist, take some pics, and I´m sure that the community will provide some interesting ideas.

-- Tempus fugit...better work wood!!!

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marcb

768 posts in 3139 days


#2 posted 03-26-2009 05:56 PM

I’m just spitball’n but it sounds like something is (possibly) worn and when the motor is mounted isn’t engaging properly.

Do you have a model number?

View Eduardo Rodriguez's profile

Eduardo Rodriguez

37 posts in 2836 days


#3 posted 03-26-2009 06:03 PM

I agree with marcb, but in my TS that piece (is like a nut splitted in half), that adjust. I must admit that in some place of the range in the rise movement there are always some slipping, no matters how much I tune it. The two belts is a torque issue, you can see it in heavy machinery with big hp.

-- Tempus fugit...better work wood!!!

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Neodogg

94 posts in 2893 days


#4 posted 03-26-2009 06:06 PM

the TS serial number is 113.29920(got the manual off of owwm), with no tension on the blades raises all the way up without trouble. I’ve cleaned & checked the teeth arbor, no wear. Just seems to slip under the tension from the motor, I can live with giving it some assistance up, but just thought there is a better way? Pictures help any?

-- If you can't fix it with a hammer, you've got an electrical problem!

View Eduardo Rodriguez's profile

Eduardo Rodriguez

37 posts in 2836 days


#5 posted 03-26-2009 06:12 PM

Is a new motor?

-- Tempus fugit...better work wood!!!

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Neodogg

94 posts in 2893 days


#6 posted 03-26-2009 06:22 PM

nope, original motor that works like a charm, I have already ran a couple test pieces of 2×4 through it.

-- If you can't fix it with a hammer, you've got an electrical problem!

View LonelyRaven's profile

LonelyRaven

44 posts in 2829 days


#7 posted 03-26-2009 06:22 PM

I have an 80’s vintage 113.298

Just throwing this out there….is the wheel that you spin to raise and lower the blade affixed solidly, and not stripped? On mine, it was stripped (plastic) so I had to replace the wheel with one from another saw. I’d love to have a nice metal wheel in it’s place…with the vintage of yours, if it’s metal your a step ahead of me already.

View Eduardo Rodriguez's profile

Eduardo Rodriguez

37 posts in 2836 days


#8 posted 03-26-2009 06:26 PM

Then you are missing something in checking the arbor. Let me check the manual I will download it from OWWM

-- Tempus fugit...better work wood!!!

View marcb's profile

marcb

768 posts in 3139 days


#9 posted 03-26-2009 06:28 PM

OK, I pulled up the manual and have an idea.

In the parts explosion, part #32 (the raising bar passes through it) looks like it can be adjusted slightly. I’m guessing that if your looking straight at it it is too far tilted to the left the motor weight is probably pulling the arbor assembly UP a hair and the worm isn’t engaging fully.

Loosen the 2 bolts and push it/twist it to the right and make sure the worm on the end of the shaft is engaging the teeth on the arbor assembly as much as possible. Do this with the motor installed so that everything is in “in use” position.

It could also just be that the worm is too worn. But a simple adjustment should tell us.

Good luck.

View Neodogg's profile

Neodogg

94 posts in 2893 days


#10 posted 03-26-2009 06:46 PM

Ok, here is a pic. Does it matter when installing the motor where it is where the blade height is i.e. does the motor have to be mounted flush with the mount while the blade is fully extended or vise versa? Where should be the “home” position when at 0 degrees? The manual talks about how the nut shouldn’t be tightened fully because it uses gravity as tension {a self tensioning}

Photobucket

-- If you can't fix it with a hammer, you've got an electrical problem!

View marcb's profile

marcb

768 posts in 3139 days


#11 posted 03-26-2009 07:19 PM

I don’t think that blade height would matter, just ensuring proper engagment of the worm to the teeth.

Just as as kinda related example. I have a Freud Router the 1700 with the fixed base. It has a quick release on the height adjustment that is basically a half nut. If sawdust gets in there and the threads don’t engage fully the router bucks and stays in one place as the force pushes the threads away from each other instead of riding the ramp of the screw as intended.

View Eduardo Rodriguez's profile

Eduardo Rodriguez

37 posts in 2836 days


#12 posted 03-26-2009 08:07 PM

It´s called cantilevered motor. The problem shouldn´t be there. I checked the manual, and must be some worn or misadjustment between the arbor housing and the lift screw. If you are restoring it, may be a good time to change bearings and observe in detail the condition of that pieces.

-- Tempus fugit...better work wood!!!

View Woodchuck1957's profile

Woodchuck1957

944 posts in 3230 days


#13 posted 03-26-2009 08:27 PM

These type of posts are pretty tough to get right without the saw being right here to look over. What part is slipping ? Is there a set screw on something that isn’t tight or striped ? Maybe your best bet is to have someone try to raise the blade while you watch whats happening inside the saw cabinet.

View BTKS's profile

BTKS

1984 posts in 2930 days


#14 posted 03-26-2009 10:22 PM

Woodchuck1957 is right, these are tough. went out and looked at my old craftsman, mid-90’s, but very similar mechanism. Looking at the posted pic, I see some drag marks on that slotted adjustment bar. The nut should be loose enough to allow free travel but not lateral movement. There is a tension spring between the motor plate mounting bracket. Mine is about 3/4 to an inch diameter and maybe two inches long. Hard to tell under tension. I think your lift would be more consistent with some back pressure and loosening the guide bar nut. I would check the hinge point below the motor as well, may be a bent rod or burr on the hinge.
Hope this helps, just my two cents.
BTKS

-- "Man's ingenuity has outrun his intelligence" (Joseph Wood Krutch)

View EEngineer's profile

EEngineer

1061 posts in 3079 days


#15 posted 03-28-2009 07:03 PM

I have a 113.29901 table saw (vintage 1965?). The trunnion is very similar to yours except that there is no separate casting to support the worm gear that drives the blade height (on your exploded parts drawing that’s number 32, attached with two bolts number 34). On my saw, that’s all one solid casting. I wonder if they made that change because of alignment problems?

If there is an alignment problem, worm gear to the teeth that raise the blade, it can most likely be fixed by loosening the two bolts (number 34 on your exploded parts drawing) and shifting that separate casting (number 32) “up” slightly. Check it for wear, though. On my saw the single thing that gets used every time I use the saw is the blade height. I always run the blade back down below the table to protect the teeth (and my fingers). Maybe its just plain wore out.

That slotted adjustment bar on the motor mount must be loose. When I first got my saw, the guy that had it before me had tightened it. It actually only allowed the blade to raise by stretching the belt. Anything more than about 1” and it got so tight I couldn’t move it anymore but it never actually slipped or “bucked”. As rusty as this saw is, maybe its not moving smoothly anymore.

-- "Find out what you cannot do and then go do it!"

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