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New Table Saw Blade, Bad Cut? Help!

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Forum topic by doorslammer posted 03-26-2009 12:33 AM 1602 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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doorslammer

108 posts in 3037 days


03-26-2009 12:33 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question tablesaw

I bent a tooth on my previous blade by foolishly beveling the blade with my zero clearance insert installed. I just purchased a new high quality 50T ATB Combo blade. After installing it and making a few test cuts, I noticed it cuts smoothly and effortlessly, but leaves noticeable cross hatching on both sides of the cut edges. I tried it using the fence and miter gauge with the same result. Everything else with the saw seems to be aligned and in tune. Is there something I’m missing or should this just be expected.

-- Aaron in TN -http://www.amwellsfurniture.com


21 replies so far

View louie's profile

louie

15 posts in 2817 days


#1 posted 03-26-2009 12:57 AM

what type of wood are you using for the test cut’s

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doorslammer

108 posts in 3037 days


#2 posted 03-26-2009 01:19 AM

walnut

-- Aaron in TN -http://www.amwellsfurniture.com

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7225 posts in 2843 days


#3 posted 03-26-2009 02:55 AM

Don’t be bashful….what blade is it?

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Woodchuck1957's profile

Woodchuck1957

944 posts in 3232 days


#4 posted 03-26-2009 03:28 AM

And what tablesaw and fence are you useing ? Did you clean the arbor flange prior to installing the blade ?

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doorslammer

108 posts in 3037 days


#5 posted 03-26-2009 03:33 AM

hah! It’s from a company called Magnate in southern Cal. Very good stuff at a good price, so I’m not skeptical of the quality.

Woodchuck, its a Grizzly 1023SL with the Grizzly fence, but your raise a good point, I did not check the arbor flange.

-- Aaron in TN -http://www.amwellsfurniture.com

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knotscott

7225 posts in 2843 days


#6 posted 03-26-2009 12:34 PM

Even the best blade companies can produce some escaping defects. I have some Magnate router bits, but haven’t used their blades, so I really don’t know where they stand. If your previous saw blade did not have the issue you described prior to it’s demise, it’s very possible it’s caused by the new blade. Do you have another blade to try as a comparison?

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Eduardo Rodriguez's profile

Eduardo Rodriguez

37 posts in 2838 days


#7 posted 03-26-2009 06:21 PM

Arbor runout?

-- Tempus fugit...better work wood!!!

View marcb's profile

marcb

768 posts in 3141 days


#8 posted 03-26-2009 06:30 PM

If the arbor is clean check the blade run out, as scott says it could be a defective unit. Even the best mfg’s in the world get 1 defect per 1 million units.

View Francisco Luna's profile

Francisco Luna

939 posts in 2861 days


#9 posted 03-26-2009 07:19 PM

Is the new blade Thin Kerf?
If yes, Manufacturers recommend the use of stiffeners for thin kerf blades to reduce deflection, that could be the problem.

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

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jcees

1015 posts in 3267 days


#10 posted 03-26-2009 08:02 PM

If run-out isn’t the problem then I would take the blade to your sharpener and have him check the plate. Even new blades from reputable mfrs can be less than perfect. Exceptions to that are the high end blades and their inherent high prices. What you’re paying for is tighter tolerances of mfr and someone to hand check each and every blade for true before it leaves the plant. Short of that there are the better lines of blades from everyone else. I’m partial to Freud’s high end blades and I also have a few older blades made by DML that I purchased from my sharpener.

Good luck.

always,
J.C.

-- When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world. -- John Muir

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doorslammer

108 posts in 3037 days


#11 posted 03-27-2009 01:01 AM

I’m going to borrow a dial indicator and base from may dad this weekend to check run out. What amount of run out is acceptable. Also, am I checking the vertical run out of the arbor shaft or horizontal run out of the flange or both?
I threw on an el-chipo DeWalt thin kerf blade and got similar results with it so I’m leaning towards the saw which is disappointing since its only a couple months old. I find it hard to believe that I damaged the arbor when I damage the first blade.

-- Aaron in TN -http://www.amwellsfurniture.com

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

7225 posts in 2843 days


#12 posted 03-27-2009 02:21 AM

Hi Aaron – Is the “noticeable cross hatching” that you mentioned just visible, or is it easy to feel with your thumb nail? I have yet to find a blade that leaves an edge no visible marks that I’d apply a finish to without some cleaning up first. Because of their flat raker tooth, the 50T ATB/R combo blades in general tend to leave slightly more swirl marks than something like a good 40T or 60T ATB grind, but they’re pretty small and you shouldn’t be able to feel them from a good quality blade. Visible marks that can’t be felt shouldn’t interfere with glue up.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View doorslammer's profile

doorslammer

108 posts in 3037 days


#13 posted 03-27-2009 02:52 AM

Here are a couple pics. You can just barely feel it. You could probably glue up just fine, but I would clean up with a hand plane or run over the jointer for finished edges rather than just sanding.

http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/dDMEczyfR9xRg8azSKYldQ?feat=directlink
http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/unaKcRaNrYGk3DNnn3EQAg?feat=directlink

-- Aaron in TN -http://www.amwellsfurniture.com

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TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3144 days


#14 posted 03-27-2009 03:20 AM

How much is the acceptable run out on a TS blade?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View marcb's profile

marcb

768 posts in 3141 days


#15 posted 03-27-2009 03:29 AM

Thats not bad, combo blades aren’t great at ripping. to get better you need a Glue Line Rip style blade.

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