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Drilling Hickory - which bit

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Forum topic by JerryLH posted 01-16-2015 02:27 AM 893 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JerryLH

104 posts in 771 days


01-16-2015 02:27 AM

I need to drill 48 (minimum) 1/2” x 3” crisp edge holes into seasoned hickory. I can’t use my drill press – the structure is assembled. I purchased a 1/2” carbide long shank forstner bit from Rockler. It cuts a clean hole but fills up ‘very’ quickly. Any suggestions on bits would be greatly appreciated.

-- Develop your character -- for it becomes your destiny. Jerry - Mannford, Ok


8 replies so far

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JerryLH

104 posts in 771 days


#1 posted 01-18-2015 01:03 AM

I sometimes I amaze myself – amazed as to how I tend to over think something and make something simple ‘seem’ as if it’s a huge obstacle. This was one of those times.

-- Develop your character -- for it becomes your destiny. Jerry - Mannford, Ok

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runswithscissors

2176 posts in 1485 days


#2 posted 01-18-2015 03:38 AM

A good quality brad point bit with sharp spurs should give you a clean hole and clear the chips adequately.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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TheFridge

5764 posts in 946 days


#3 posted 01-18-2015 04:30 AM

I’m guessing you made the Forstner work?

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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JerryLH

104 posts in 771 days


#4 posted 01-18-2015 03:44 PM

As I said, I turned and easy job into—- something else – to the extent I feel I’ve learned a lesson.

The simple answer was, start the hole with the forstner bit to get good clean edges, (until the forstner starts loading up), then switched to normal bit. Simple!

When I turn an easy job into a difficult one I’m reminded of what Winston Churchill said of close friend which was on his death bed told him, ‘You know Winston I’ve had a lot of troubles in my life, most of which never happened.’

-- Develop your character -- for it becomes your destiny. Jerry - Mannford, Ok

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Joel_B

294 posts in 841 days


#5 posted 01-18-2015 04:24 PM

I have been through that scenario.
I was drilling some holes in cedar with a 1/2 inch forstner bit using my hand drill.
It quickly became jammed. I thought the bit I bought might be bad.
So then I ordered a W.L. Fuller brad point bit, it worked much better and is very high quality.
Expensive but worth it. I will never buy another brand of drill bits.
I read somewhere forstner bits should only be used in a drill press.
Jut recently I used it in my drill press to drill some hickory and it worked fine.

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

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MrRon

3926 posts in 2704 days


#6 posted 01-18-2015 08:12 PM

If you can use a plunge router, get a 1/2 HSS 4-flute endmill. Using a speed of around 12000 rpm, you will get a clean smooth hole. You will have to make a jig to position the holes and take progressively deeper cuts, starting with 1/8” deep plunge and 1/4” for all other plunges until the depth is reached.

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JerryLH

104 posts in 771 days


#7 posted 01-19-2015 03:46 AM

Thanks Mr Ron and All for the feedback. I gave a thought to the plunge router route but I knew I didn’t have the details I needed to do it right (but I do now). Thanks Again. I’ll post a pic soon of what I was doing.

-- Develop your character -- for it becomes your destiny. Jerry - Mannford, Ok

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JerryLH

104 posts in 771 days


#8 posted 01-19-2015 03:21 PM

Here’s what I’ve been working on – a work bench for my son.

-- Develop your character -- for it becomes your destiny. Jerry - Mannford, Ok

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