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Stanley no 7 restoration

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Forum topic by drewlane posted 03-23-2009 08:18 PM 5916 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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drewlane

28 posts in 2812 days


03-23-2009 08:18 PM

Hey everyone.

First time poster, long time reader here at lumberjocks.

I recently acquired a cheap ($10) Stanley no 7C from a lady when buying an unrelated item off of craigslist (it never hurts to ask for certain things when someone says they’re moving…) and it’s in pretty poor condition. Rust is very prevalent and I’m guessing the Japanning is 50-60% intact. But, the sole is dead flat, the totes and knobs just need to be cleaned up (paint and minor dings and such) and blade could probably just be replaced.

So my questions are:

1. How do I age/type this plane? I’ve seen the site that ages Stanley no 4’s but nothing about any other types of planes. I also have a very older 5C that I would like to type as well.
2. How about rust removal? I’m currently thinking (as long as the plane isn’t a “collector”) that electrolysis might be best as I’m pretty stingy with my money and Evaporust would cost more than I paid for the plane.
3. If the japanning is only 50-60% intact, would it be best to just go ahead and remove all of it and repaint the top of the body? What type of paint? Easiest way to remove the japanning?

I’m not really worried too much about the “collector” value of this plane. The shape it’s in, I don’t think most would want something like this. First and foremost, I just want it to be useable. But, if I can make it look decent in the process, I will.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.


23 replies so far

View Francisco Luna's profile

Francisco Luna

938 posts in 2854 days


#1 posted 03-23-2009 08:29 PM

Dating the plane:
http://www.hyperkitten.com/tools/stanley_bench_plane/dating/ (plane dating forechart)
Rust Removal:
Electrolytic Dust Removal could be the easier way to go…...do you have a battery charger?
I would leave the Jappaning at the way it’s now.

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

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drewlane

28 posts in 2812 days


#2 posted 03-23-2009 08:36 PM

will that plane dating flow chart apply to planes other than a no 4?

could there be rust under the jappaning?

what would you coat the exisiting jappaning to further prevent rust?

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HokieMojo

2103 posts in 3189 days


#3 posted 03-23-2009 08:41 PM

In my experience, rust can be beneath the jappaning. If I were to do it again with the planes that I’ve tried restoring (not collectibles), I’d strip all the jappaning, do the electrolysis thing. Hit it with some acid phosphoric acid, and then spray paint where the jappaning used to be. That would prevent rust in all the nooks and crannies. Just my thoughts. Hope you get some more good replies.

View Francisco Luna's profile

Francisco Luna

938 posts in 2854 days


#4 posted 03-23-2009 08:53 PM

YEs, that flow chart works with any plane…..Do you have a pic of the plane?

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

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PurpLev

8523 posts in 3109 days


#5 posted 03-23-2009 08:59 PM

Moai has the right info on aging it.

as far as electrolysis – should work great for the plane’s body, but myself – I wouldn’t use it on the blade as there are numerous reports that this process might change the structure of the metal, and since the blade metallogically is essential, it might be best to avoid it on the blade. the blade should either be scraped/sanded off, or replaced all together (with a new beefier blade) if you’re restoring this plane to a workable condition you might as well do that as well.

$10 … NICE! never hurts to ask

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View drewlane's profile

drewlane

28 posts in 2812 days


#6 posted 03-23-2009 10:28 PM



View Francisco Luna's profile

Francisco Luna

938 posts in 2854 days


#7 posted 03-23-2009 10:33 PM

Very Nice Plane, Type 19, 1948-60….$10? The deal of the year!
I bought a #4 1/2 recently, similar condition:

I do not like the Electrlytic process because it leaves the plane steel parts in a “cold” gray color. So I just soak all the parts in Mineral spirits and clean them with the help of a brush

I use this rubbing Compound to “clean” the Jappaning, it works fine for me, leaves the surface clean and helps to get rid of paint speckles. As it is a little abrassive, helps with the rusted areas where the japaning is gone.

For the steel parts, I use #320 &400 sand paper.

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12642 posts in 3558 days


#8 posted 03-23-2009 10:44 PM

Citric Acid is another option for rust removal. I agree with Moai on the timeframe of the plane and would not worry about collector value. I would recommend a Hock Blade and chip breaker if your planning to use it often.

If you have not seen my blog, I have collected some plane restoration info.

http://lumberjocks.com/WayneC/blog/series/40

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View sIKE's profile

sIKE

1271 posts in 3215 days


#9 posted 03-24-2009 12:06 AM

I have used evaporust to get rid of the rust, then a Dremel rotary tool with a round brass brush to remove the Japanning, this also helps to even then surface out if you have some pitting. Hope this helps.

-- //FC - Round Rock, TX - "Experience is what you get just after you need it"

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3558 days


#10 posted 03-24-2009 12:56 AM

Thking about FC’s post I normally leave the japanning alone and apply a coat of Shellac to seal the body of the plane and help prevent further rust.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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drewlane

28 posts in 2812 days


#11 posted 03-24-2009 01:32 AM

is there a particular reason to leave the jappaning? Other than the collector value of the plane? What if there is rust underneath the jappaning that the rust removal does not get?

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3558 days


#12 posted 03-24-2009 01:55 AM

On this plane (it is a more recent model) I would think the collector value would be marginal. I would be looking at it from a use perspective. So I would clean it up and replace the blade with a Hock Blade. Also, I would set the original blade aside to return to the plane if I ever upgraded to a different plane.

As far as the japanning goes, it is personal preference. Shellac should be sufficient to deal with any rust under the japanning if you cover the area.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Francisco Luna's profile

Francisco Luna

938 posts in 2854 days


#13 posted 03-24-2009 03:01 AM

Another option is Sandblasting, will leave that area like new…

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

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WayneC

12642 posts in 3558 days


#14 posted 03-24-2009 05:02 AM

Now you just need to decide and blog your progress. Looking forward to seeing some nice shavings.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View JimmyC's profile

JimmyC

106 posts in 2863 days


#15 posted 03-24-2009 05:17 AM

An exceptionally good site about Stanley planes is Patrick’s

http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan0a.html

It might have some info for you.

Good Luck.

-- -JimmyC...Clayton,NC- "Just smile and wave boys, smile and wave"

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