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Hinge mortise repair?

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Forum topic by ShawnSpencer posted 01-14-2015 10:56 PM 545 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ShawnSpencer

81 posts in 1001 days


01-14-2015 10:56 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I blew out the back side of two of my mortises on a box project and having trouble with the repair. The side of the box is thin and leaves me with about a 1/16th between the mortise and the inside. I used a backer board for support when chopping but the repairs keep splitting at the glue. I’m basically gluing in a peice to fill part of the mortise and chopping it back out. I included a pic of a broken and a successful one to give yall an idea of what I’m dealing with here. Any advice on how to repair this? I’m about to go with some filler and then chop that out I’m so frustrated.

-- I know you know...


6 replies so far

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

986 posts in 2103 days


#1 posted 01-18-2015 12:08 AM

Cut off the whole edge all the way around and start over. The only other thing I can think of is mix up an epoxy colored putty (QUICKWOOD) and try to re-machine. Then blend/cover up the patch while finishing.

-- Respectfully, Paul

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firefighterontheside

13442 posts in 1316 days


#2 posted 01-18-2015 12:19 AM

I would say just get rid of that 1/16 and make it look like you meant to do it that way. I think it will look fine without it.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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Loren

8295 posts in 3108 days


#3 posted 01-18-2015 12:46 AM

You can take a marking gauge (hopefully one with a knife)
and scribe in 1/4”. Then reset the gauge and scribe to the
lowest point of blowout. Carefully chisel out a little shelf
and fill with a little stick. I use a smooth plane inverted in
a bench vise to dimension these little parts if I can’t find
something that fits. Usually I split the stick off a scrap
piece with a chisel and then it’s rough and needs to
be flattened. In this case you really only need one flat
face, the down-facing one. Then the rest of the mortise
can be filled with putty and reworked with a chisel and
file from the edge.

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ShawnSpencer

81 posts in 1001 days


#4 posted 01-18-2015 01:12 AM

Thank you for the responses. My mind never went to cutting it down and starting over. That is a great idea and really the best solution. I got the patch to work before reading the response. My problem ended up being glue that was too cold and dull-ish chisels. I felt like I had just sharpened them but, it really made all the difference. My first plan was to remove the 1/16 and have the hinge edge show. I mocked it up on the broken mortise. After some consideration, the bit of wood there gives it a real look of craftsmanship and perfect execution (not completely in my case).

-- I know you know...

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ShawnSpencer

81 posts in 1001 days


#5 posted 01-18-2015 01:17 AM



You can take a marking gauge (hopefully one with a knife)
and scribe in 1/4”. Then reset the gauge and scribe to the
lowest point of blowout. Carefully chisel out a little shelf
and fill with a little stick. I use a smooth plane inverted in
a bench vise to dimension these little parts if I can t find
something that fits. Usually I split the stick off a scrap
piece with a chisel and then it s rough and needs to
be flattened. In this case you really only need one flat
face, the down-facing one. Then the rest of the mortise
can be filled with putty and reworked with a chisel and
file from the edge.

- Loren

Wow, what great advice. I’m floored with how good a method this is. Thank you

-- I know you know...

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Loren

8295 posts in 3108 days


#6 posted 01-18-2015 01:18 AM

It’s not uncommon to see veneer patches under hinges
in antiques. I don’t know if it’s from hinge replacement
with thinner hinges or because the area under the hinge
got torn up. I suspect the latter.

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