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Forum topic by Hawk_Guy posted 01-14-2015 02:35 AM 1612 views 1 time favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Hawk_Guy

82 posts in 1108 days


01-14-2015 02:35 AM

Hello everyone, I have been toying around with the idea of building kitchen cabinets for a while now and am finally ready to start. I would like to construct raised panel doors such as the ones pictured below.

I will finish the cabinets with a white semigloss paint. The panels will be constructed from MDF and the rails and stiles will be constructed from a hardwood. I will use face frames and cup hinges (most likely).

My first question would be what type of hardwood is typically used for a painted finish?
Secondly what sort of bit would be required for the MDF raised panel?


23 replies so far

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jtm

218 posts in 1097 days


#1 posted 01-14-2015 03:31 AM

1) Poplar or maple

2) Any standard raised panel bit should work. Doesn’t MLCS list the panel bits used on that page?

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Hawk_Guy

82 posts in 1108 days


#2 posted 01-14-2015 03:42 AM

Jtm, I was thinking poplar but was concerned about durability and was leaning more towards maple. I just didn’t know if using maple was a bit silly because of the painted finish.

Mlcs does have router bits for raised panels, I was just concerned about using them on MDF.

So I will use maple for the rails and stiles.

So my next problem is the the profiles of the rails and stiles become less than 3/4” after I route the face detail on them. This would not be ideal for cup hinges which is what I would prefer to use. So I will need 1” stock. I haven’t been able to find that for maple and I do not own a jointer or a planer.

View Tim_CPWD 's profile

Tim_CPWD

306 posts in 706 days


#3 posted 01-14-2015 03:48 AM

I am not sure what woods you have easy access to but alder is also another paint grade cabinet wood.

-- Tim Haenisch, San Diego Ca. http://www.facebook.com/commandperformancewooddesigns

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1770 days


#4 posted 01-14-2015 03:57 AM

Soft maple will be harder than poplar and paint better. Cheaper than hard maple.

If someone suggest “I’d just glue up some pine 1×8’s” I wouldn’t do it.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Hawk_Guy

82 posts in 1108 days


#5 posted 01-14-2015 04:02 AM

Tim, thanks for the heads up. I’m not familiar but after researching I see that it machines well and has a finer grain texture which is desirable. My only concern is that it isn’t hard enough to deal with my kids.

I don’t know how to guage the suitability of a material, so poplar and alder may actually be fine, I just need some reassurance. I will be spending a lot of time and money on this project and would hate to regret my choice of materials.

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NoThanks

798 posts in 990 days


#6 posted 01-14-2015 04:17 AM



Soft maple will be harder than poplar and paint better. Cheaper that hard maple.

If someone suggest “I’d just glue up some pine 1×8’s” I wouldn t do it.

- AlaskaGuy

+1
.............to both, lol

-- Because I'm gone, that's why!

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Tim_CPWD

306 posts in 706 days


#7 posted 01-14-2015 04:26 AM

Have you looked into Beech. It is pretty hard and paints well. I haven’t used it to make cabinets but I have used it for other things. Again I am not sure what you have available in your area but it may be worth looking into.

I have used both alder and poplar to build cabinets. Both tend to run on the soft side so that may be a bit of a challenge with kids. Have you decided what material you are going to use for your finished ends. As a suggestion Red Birch works well. Several years ago I did a kitchen for someone using Alder for the face frames and Red Birch for the finished ends. I stained it cherry and shot it with clear lacquer. This combo worked well.

-- Tim Haenisch, San Diego Ca. http://www.facebook.com/commandperformancewooddesigns

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1770 days


#8 posted 01-14-2015 04:35 AM

Do a search on ( janka scale ) this will give the hardness of various woods. Hard maple may be the way for to to go if you expect a lot of abuse/kids.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View ,'s profile

,

2387 posts in 3008 days


#9 posted 01-14-2015 05:08 AM

I would be hesitant to build a mitered door without adequate tooling. In fact back in my pre shaper days I owned one of those router cutters. It was good learning exp. One thing I learned was that my router table set up was inadequate and down right dangerous. If u like the mitered doors I can get u a set of those type doors for an extremely fair price and there is a decent variety of profiles to choose from and they are extremely high quality. And paint grade maple would be my choice.

But if u want the pride of doing it all yourself, just make sure your set up is more than adequate. Some set ups are going to be far superior than others. An inferior set up will produce inferior quality of cut and could be potentially not safe.

-- .

View bruc101's profile

bruc101

1077 posts in 3003 days


#10 posted 01-14-2015 05:59 AM

All of our painted cabinets are built with Maple. Paint grade works just as well as premium and can cost a lot less money.

I think I would take Jerry’s advice and let him purchase those doors for you. It takes some skill to make mitered doors like with those profiles and learning could get expensive, and painful.

Follow his advice on set up too if you decided to build them yourself.

-- Bruce Free Plans http://plans.sawmillvalley.org

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jerryminer

528 posts in 902 days


#11 posted 01-14-2015 07:29 AM



I would be hesitant to build a mitered door without adequate tooling.

Amen to that!

I wouldn’t want to build cabinet doors without being able to straighten and flatten the stock—-and bring it all to exactly the same thickness. For me, that means jointer and planer (and table saw). If you have the time and patience, there are hand-tool methods, but jeez…

I suggest you try one practice cabinet before you commit to a whole kitchen. You MIGHT be able to buy flat, straight stock from a supplier, but I’ve never seen it in 30+ years in the business. Mitered doors with twisted stock will be frustrating at the least.

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1770 days


#12 posted 01-14-2015 07:50 AM

“I would be hesitant to build a mitered door without adequate tooling.’‘

This brings up the question, what tool do you have?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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AlaskaGuy

2406 posts in 1770 days


#13 posted 01-14-2015 08:27 AM

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Hawk_Guy

82 posts in 1108 days


#14 posted 01-14-2015 01:52 PM

I have a kreg router table with a 3 1/4 horse triton router with lift. A cabinet table saw with accurate crosscut sled and very good sliding compound miter. Also have a mortising machine if I wanted to mortise the mitered corners. Also have a Fuji mini mite 4 stage hvlp, delta 14” band saw, and floor model jet oscillating spindle sander, and jet drill press. I’ve been stocking up for the occasion. I do have a pocket hole jig for the face frames. I will purchase a jointer soon but will probably just buy flattened and jointed stock for this project (I heard others speak of this and have seen some online).

As far as buying cabintes, well my goal is to get into cabinet making so I have no desire to buy. I’ll practice with some cabinets for the garage and other places before focusing on the main event.

Thanks for all the help folks!

I will probably go with 3/4 birch ply for the ends, I’ve painted this before and had glass like finish.

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Earlextech

1159 posts in 2152 days


#15 posted 01-14-2015 02:28 PM

I’m concerned that you didn’t ask – “What kind of paint should I use?” For some reason people think painted cabinets are painted with latex. I know I’m answering a question you’re not asking, but, Kem Aqua from Sherwin Williams, tinted to whatever color you want is a proper finish, not “paint”.

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "Finished"!

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