LumberJocks

LJ's help me lay out my shop.

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by wdbutcher71 posted 1952 days ago 1706 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View wdbutcher71's profile

wdbutcher71

36 posts in 2023 days


1952 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: advice workshop

I am finishing construction of my shop this spring and I would like some advise on layout. I have a room that is 30’x 30’ to work with. If you check out my workshop page you will see the equipment I am working with i.e. table saw, planner, router table. There are a few more pieces that are not pictured namely the band saw and large air compressor. Tell me what has work well for you and what has not. Nothing is set in stone at this point so all ideas are welcome. Thanks for the input.

-- Matthew M. Central Washington


19 replies so far

View Cory's profile

Cory

721 posts in 2016 days


#1 posted 1952 days ago

Man that’s going to be a nice set up. I’m sure you’ll get some great advice from everyone here. I don’t have any experience with setting up a shop like that, but there are a couple of books that might help you. Wood magazine just came out with a magazine about America’s best shops. Each shop includes multiple pictures and a floor plan with the tools laid out. I picked it up at Lowe’s for like $6. That might be a good resource for you.

Cory

-- The secret to getting ahead is getting started.

View JimmyC's profile

JimmyC

106 posts in 1999 days


#2 posted 1951 days ago

I have a 42×30 shop and when I got it there was a wall dividing it into two rooms 18×32 and 22×32. At first I was tempted to take the wall down, but decided to make a machine room (22×32) and a tool/finish room(18×32) and love it. You may want to seperate off an area for bench work and or finish work before starting the layout. Even with 900 sq/ft I would set the machines up to be efficient when moving from one to the other, kind of like setting it up as if you had a 2 car garage for the machines. If you give your self alot of room around your equiptment, you’ll soon find your space shrinking at a real fast rate. Also, if possible, make a seperate room for the air compressor and dust collection system, you won’t regret it.

Don’t forget a first aid kit and fire extinguishers.

Good Luck.

-- -JimmyC...Clayton,NC- "Just smile and wave boys, smile and wave"

View Waldschrat's profile

Waldschrat

505 posts in 2033 days


#3 posted 1951 days ago

I agree with Jimmy C… Just what I wanted to say! Seperate the compressors and dust collection system… I would even perhaps consider laying a false floor so cabeling and suction tubes and such are out of the way. we have that in our shop and it works great… and makes for good storage for stuff not neededoften too!

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

View wdbutcher71's profile

wdbutcher71

36 posts in 2023 days


#4 posted 1951 days ago

Cory, JimmyC and Waldschrat, thanks for the input. I thought his would be a bigger thread, 8,600+/- Lumber Jocks and only three that have an opinoin. Who knew. Thanks again.

-- Matthew M. Central Washington

View MedicKen's profile

MedicKen

1599 posts in 2059 days


#5 posted 1951 days ago

If you go to Grizzly.com there is a workshop planner that will give you a birdeye view of ther area you want to build. It is a good tool for placing machines in various locations on a template. It will also allow you move the machines to different locations to see what will work best for you.

-- My job is to give my kids things to discuss with their therapist....medic20447@gmail.com

View rj2001xl's profile

rj2001xl

2 posts in 1976 days


#6 posted 1951 days ago

Funny, I’m at about the exact same stage on my shop that I just built last fall. I’m an engineer so I’ve been playing around with my shop layout on AutoCAD. I’d post a picture of what I’ve come up with, but I can’t figure out how to do this here.

I’m curious what you plan to put on your walls? Drywall is the cheapest but I hate the mud and sanding part and it is not as rugged as I’d like.

View gjd's profile

gjd

18326 posts in 2249 days


#7 posted 1951 days ago

Rj2001xl:
I asked about drywall or OSB for shop walls last summer. Drywall – Higher fire rating, OSB more durable. Jocks were split 50/50. I went with drywall. The day I was moving stuff back in the lumber rack got away from me and now I wish I had done OSB.
I have a 13×21 shop and used the Grizzly Tool to lay it out. Now I have to move from paper to reality.

-- gjd Southcentral Wisconsin

View wdbutcher71's profile

wdbutcher71

36 posts in 2023 days


#8 posted 1951 days ago

rj2001xl:
I am planning to sheet rock for the same reason Bureaucrat mentioned, fire protection. I don’t mind to mud and tape but your right sanding sucks. I want it to be clean and white when I am done.

-- Matthew M. Central Washington

View Waldschrat's profile

Waldschrat

505 posts in 2033 days


#9 posted 1951 days ago

I also just thought of something… how much lumber are you working, and how big of projects are you usually working on… do you do a lot of veneering? If you are working on lots of solid wood, larger projects then, thickness planer, joiner, and shaper, space is important, if you are working alot of pre veneered or just veneered stuff in general, then I would say arange space so you have more asembly room and table saw space for formatting the large sheet goods!

Also, good to consider for heating a wood fired stove or saw dust brickette/pellet oven, which can be fed automatically and save a ton on heating costs! even if the initial investment is a bit more… most of our shops here have some sort of wood oven for heating (and even cooking coffee, and thats nice too!) because one has always something to burn after a project!

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

View Waldschrat's profile

Waldschrat

505 posts in 2033 days


#10 posted 1951 days ago

just checked out the pic of your shop, and definetly might be good considering a office space enclosure, or even ad on some how to keep out dust and the like.

Love the mobile security system… I have two of them as well!

-- Nicholas, Cabinet/Furniture Maker, Blue Hill, Maine

View JimmyC's profile

JimmyC

106 posts in 1999 days


#11 posted 1951 days ago

Matthew,
It’s a good idea going with the sheetrock, I have OSB and I need 15 prs. of fluorescents to keep it well lit. The painted drywall will help alot. Two other things that I was thinking about and that is storing your long boards vertically since you have 12”ceilings, and put as many machines on wheels as possible. I love my vertical storage and I have about 1300 bd/ft of stock, and until you get all of the machines you want mobility is wonderful.

Good Luck.

-- -JimmyC...Clayton,NC- "Just smile and wave boys, smile and wave"

View Woodchuck1957's profile

Woodchuck1957

944 posts in 2361 days


#12 posted 1951 days ago

I think I would go with OSB for the first 4 feet, then sheetrock the rest, tape and mud, then paint it all. Running all your electrical through exposed conduit would make it easy for future electrical changes might be something to consider also.

View wooleywoodsmith's profile

wooleywoodsmith

152 posts in 1957 days


#13 posted 1950 days ago

the one thing that I will always make sure that I have is ample room beside my miter saw with a good stop. I built a stop and fence last year and let me just say that it has drastically reduced the thyme needed.

-- wooley

View Al Killian's profile

Al Killian

273 posts in 2350 days


#14 posted 1950 days ago

My shop or the part I use is 30×35. The ceiling will be insulated with blown in fiberglass(it is a three story building) and tin to cover it up. The walls are 1/2 drywall. Layout for me is fairly simple, ts and molding machine sit dead center of the shop. Enter the main door turn left and bs and clamp rack go on the wall with the rest room and dc room. Nwxt wall going clock wise RAS,DP and router station go on this wall, next is the slideing door with my wall of cabinets for most of the storage along with the jointer. Next wall is my second door, wood stove and lathe. Finish room, lumber storage and finish room are up one fligth.

-- Owner of custom millwork shop

View wdbutcher71's profile

wdbutcher71

36 posts in 2023 days


#15 posted 1950 days ago

LJ’s thanks for all the ideas.
Waldschrat: The majority of my projects to date have either been sollid wood benches and tables or plywood cabinets with face frames. So no veneering as of yet. I think I am a few project a way from that. right now I need to lay out to handle sheet goods by my self and have assembly space. I had thought about adding a mezzinene along the north wall of the shop for lumber storage and a work becnh below along the same wall. The only problem is a nice long work bench for me is just going to become a junk catcher. So I am leaning to all cabinet and shelf space and two larger assembly tables on wheels. As to heat I have a 5000 watt electic heater hung from the ceiling already, I thought about a wood stove or a pellet stove an decided to go electirc because it is cleaner and I dont have to store and move wood around the 9 months of the year I don’t need heat. I don’t know if you can tell by my profile picture but I am naturally insulated and don’t need much extra heat.

-- Matthew M. Central Washington

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase