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Any of these fallen trees worth saving?

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Forum topic by Too_Many_Tools posted 01-13-2015 05:55 AM 1402 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Too_Many_Tools

32 posts in 842 days


01-13-2015 05:55 AM

Last year I had a butternut, wild cherry, red oak and two shag bark hickory trees blow down in a storm.

Are they worth getting sawed into lumber?

What are these woods best used for?

Considering they are from the home place, I would like to make projects from the lumber for the family as keepsakes.

As expected, the local wood burners all want to relieve me of my “problem trees”...I would rather have them made into something other than smoke up someone’s chimney.

Thanks for any advice.


13 replies so far

View wbrisett's profile

wbrisett

201 posts in 1811 days


#1 posted 01-13-2015 10:07 AM

If you can find a local sawyer, that’s your best option. The only tree I’m not sure of is butternut. The rest are worth saving for your projects depending on the size.

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Monte Pittman

22003 posts in 1800 days


#2 posted 01-13-2015 10:29 AM

Depends on the size. Anything over 12” is saved here for sawmill.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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cebfish

129 posts in 2150 days


#3 posted 01-13-2015 10:56 AM

I would keep the butternut also I love to use butternut beautiful wood

View bobro's profile

bobro

308 posts in 773 days


#4 posted 01-13-2015 02:18 PM

Are you f-n kidding? Those are all wonderful furniture and cabinet hardwoods. Butternut is a kind of walnut (Juglans) but softer and blonder wood, very nice. If the trees are at least about so and so big around (like, 12-14” + diameter as Monte Pittman suggests) and without problems (hollow etc) that’s a lot of wood. You need to find a local sawyer with the gear and know-how, I bet if you give your location, someone here can even give you a more or less local reference.

When I was a teen I got some lovely lumber out of storm trees with nothing but a wedge and sledge and sandvik, plus copious amounts of time, beer and pot, and I hope to take my son through the process in a few years when he’s old enough. It’s not rocket science, and there’s nothing like having your own wood.

-- Lao Ma: You are so full of anger and hatred. Xena: Everybody's gotta be full of something.

View EPJartisan's profile

EPJartisan

1116 posts in 2587 days


#5 posted 01-13-2015 02:51 PM

Butternut, works like walnut and related like to it Bobro pointed out, but it does not utilize it’s juglone to poison other plants and animals.. and is a little softer than walnut.. It carves really really nicely. It looks more like ash. Love the stuff. I have a few large logs from 2008, which are just ready to re-saw and use.

-- " 'Truth' is like a beautiful flower, unique to each plant and to the season it blossoms ... 'Fact' is the root and leaf, allowing the plant grow and bloom again."

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1938 days


#6 posted 01-13-2015 08:19 PM

They should make some good lumber. The oak and hickory will have ambrosia beetle holes, and the hickory along with the oak sapwood may be spalted. The cherry and butternut sapwood may be a bit punky, but the heartwood will be good.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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Rob

229 posts in 2449 days


#7 posted 01-13-2015 10:07 PM

Butternut, also referred to as White Walnut is a much softer wood than Black Walnut. On the Janga scale, Black Walnut is 1010 and Butternut is 490 so its a soft hardwood. Very pretty though and a nice wood for carving. I just wouldn’t be using it for anything that is going to exposed to wear and tear

View bannerpond1's profile

bannerpond1

397 posts in 1361 days


#8 posted 01-13-2015 11:25 PM

Find a sawyer and have it sawn. It might two years to air dry it, but do it. It will be worth it. I have done this with cherry, sassafras, maple, hickory, and sycamore. I have a method to quartersaw the logs which is easily done and ends up with minimal waste and fantastic grain. Here’s what it looks like in schematic:

You end up with a lot of QS and four riftsawn timbers to use as table legs. QS cherry is outstanding! QS sycamore resembles lacewood. QS sassafras resembles oak but with a light walnut color.

-- --Dale Page

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Too_Many_Tools

32 posts in 842 days


#9 posted 01-20-2015 04:43 AM

Thanks for the responses so far.

So what is the going rate for turning these trees into lumber?

And how long should one wait before making the lumber into something of beauty?

Thanks

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1572 posts in 1938 days


#10 posted 01-20-2015 12:51 PM

For guys with a hydraulic mill, about $.35/BF. I have a manual mill, and although I do not custom saw other people’s logs very often, I charge $.50/bf or $60 per hour. My mill is a manual mill and not as fast and efficient as a hydraulic mill.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View Buckethead's profile

Buckethead

3140 posts in 1331 days


#11 posted 01-20-2015 01:44 PM



Find a sawyer and have it sawn. It might two years to air dry it, but do it. It will be worth it. I have done this with cherry, sassafras, maple, hickory, and sycamore. I have a method to quartersaw the logs which is easily done and ends up with minimal waste and fantastic grain. Here s what it looks like in schematic:

You end up with a lot of QS and four riftsawn timbers to use as table legs. QS cherry is outstanding! QS sycamore resembles lacewood. QS sassafras resembles oak but with a light walnut color.

- bannerpond1

+1

It’s better to reveal the beautiful grain in each piece of wood than to simply attempt to get more wide pieces. For framing lumber, no, but for hardwoods, it’s a sin that any are ever plain sawn.

-- Support woodworking hand models. Buy me a sawstop.

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Too_Many_Tools

32 posts in 842 days


#12 posted 02-02-2015 03:02 AM

Anyone else with rates?

I also agree with trying to use wood for something else than burning it. I have seen some BEAUTIFUL wood burnt simply because…very sad.

View Logboy's profile

Logboy

43 posts in 2692 days


#13 posted 02-05-2015 12:47 AM

I can give you my rates, but unless I’m in your area, it wont do you any good. Most rates seem to go from $.25-.60 a bdft, more if they have to do leg work like moving the logs, trimming, debarking, etc. Some might go hourly. To give you a rough estimate, a 24” log, 8’ long has 200 bdft in it and could range from $50-120 to have sawn. I guarantee you cant purchase 200 bdft of lumber that cheap.

That said, you never said what diameters and lengths your logs are. If they are small and crooked, it doesnt matter what species they are because theyre firewood. I get that all the time with walnut trees. People think their 8” walnut log is very valuable and want it sawed when in reality they could buy more lumber of higher quality at the store already kiln dried and planed for the same price.

In short, find a local sawer with some experience to come look at your logs. If you dont like what he says get a second opinion. You could post photos here as well for some of us to glance at.

-- No log is too big to saw! www.logboy.com

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