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Forum topic by CharlieM1958 posted 03-17-2009 09:20 PM 1153 views 0 times favorited 35 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CharlieM1958

16242 posts in 3681 days


03-17-2009 09:20 PM

I can change out a switch or a receptacle, or replace a light fixture… but that’s about as far as my electrical expertise goes. Hence the question:

Ever since I replaced my Ryobi table-top saw with my Ridgid TS3660, my wife complains about how it dims the lights when I start it up. It was never a problem with the Ryobi, even though both saws are rated at 13 amps, and the Ridgid is plugged into the same outlet that the Ryobi was. Is there a logical reason for this, and is it a problem? My house is about 30 years old and is wired with 20-amp breakers. I have not tripped the breaker at all.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"


35 replies so far

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3112 days


#1 posted 03-17-2009 09:27 PM

yes, 13 amp refers to the “normal use” amperage consumption of the motor – but at startup the motors electrical need spikes as it’s trying to rev up all that metal into it’s running speed – which takes a bit more than the claimed 13amps.

the ryobi is lighter (direct universal motor) and would take less of a spike to start up compared to the heavier (TEFC belt driven) ridgid.

if you can, assign a dedicated breaker for the saw – unless you don’t mind dimming the lights – as it WILL do that on startup

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Karson's profile

Karson

35035 posts in 3864 days


#2 posted 03-17-2009 09:31 PM

Charlie: The starting up amperage is greater now and it pulls down the available on the circuit.

You state that it has a 20 Amp fuse but 30 years ago most circuits were probably just 15 Amps which means they have 14 Guage wire. To use 20 Amp breakers you should be on 12 gage wire.

It could be a 15 map circuit wire trying to haul 20 Amps down it and it is causing the dimming. You might see if you can run a new line with 12 Ga wire into your shop for the increased Amperage needed, and then leave her lights alone.

It can be dangerous to overload 15 Amp circuits by using a 20 Amp circuit breaker. I’ve done it before but I try to split the circuit if I can to take part of it away.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

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papadan

1174 posts in 2831 days


#3 posted 03-17-2009 09:39 PM

If possible, run a 220 circuit into our shop and change the wiring on the saw. Increasd voltage will decrease the amp draw. Your saw will start and run smoother.

-- Carpenter assembles with hands, Designer builds with brains, Artist creates with heart!

View Randy Sharp's profile

Randy Sharp

363 posts in 3136 days


#4 posted 03-17-2009 09:41 PM

I think it might be something else Charlie.

My take is that everytime you start the saw, your wife hears it and her first thought is “I’ll bet he’s gonna get sawdust on my washer and dryer again!” Her eyes naturally squint and her lips tighten, as she imagines it happening.

With the squinting of eyes, it makes the lights simply appear to dim. Am I close?

-- Randy, Tupelo, MS ~ A man who honors his wife will have children who honor their father.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3112 days


#5 posted 03-17-2009 09:43 PM

yeah, or what Randy said… LOL

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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CharlieM1958

16242 posts in 3681 days


#6 posted 03-17-2009 09:48 PM

Thanks, guys. I suspected the case might be that it takes more power at startup, but I wasn’t sure.

I actually have 2 unused 220 circuits… one is already in the garage,running to where the washer and dryer are. (We use a gas dryer). The other is for a range that replaced with gas. So maybe that’s a good option.

Karson, I’m pretty sure the wiring is up to specs, as we had a full inspection done when we bought the house 6 years ago.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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CharlieM1958

16242 posts in 3681 days


#7 posted 03-17-2009 09:49 PM

Randy, you might really be on to something there! :-)

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Randy Sharp's profile

Randy Sharp

363 posts in 3136 days


#8 posted 03-17-2009 09:58 PM

I’d like to pledge the first $10 bill to the “Build Charlie a free-standing woodshop” fund! Who’s in with me?!!

-- Randy, Tupelo, MS ~ A man who honors his wife will have children who honor their father.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8251 posts in 2892 days


#9 posted 03-17-2009 10:02 PM

I’m in.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 3451 days


#10 posted 03-17-2009 10:06 PM

Maybe Katrina did it.

Of course the government’s to blame for the storm.
Ask Uncle Sam for a bailout for your electrical system :-)

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8523 posts in 3112 days


#11 posted 03-17-2009 10:13 PM

count me in, I only have $9.99 on me right now though (dont ask me why)

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16242 posts in 3681 days


#12 posted 03-17-2009 10:24 PM

WhoooWheeee!!!!!

I’ll post my Paypal info.

Retirement here I come!!!!!!

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Gary's profile

Gary

8968 posts in 2896 days


#13 posted 03-17-2009 10:27 PM

Does an IOU count…..

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1546 posts in 3224 days


#14 posted 03-17-2009 10:38 PM

There is a great deal of difference between a “universal ” and an “induction” motor. Since universal motors are not standardized, the only ratings usually given are amps. Consumers are best left to guess what the HP, and full load speed and current actually is. Induction motors are standardized by NEMA. The nameplate will clearly show the HP, full load amps and speed. The starting current will briefly be four to five times the full load current. Your new saw will outperform the old bench top model in every way, providing far more cutting torque at a lower speed.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

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CharlieM1958

16242 posts in 3681 days


#15 posted 03-17-2009 10:42 PM

Oh it does….. no question about that.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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