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Sawing Green Wood with a Bandsaw & Eucalyptus Lumber

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Forum topic by cmaeda posted 03-16-2009 09:39 AM 6104 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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cmaeda

205 posts in 2210 days


03-16-2009 09:39 AM

Hello, earlier in the week, I had some eucalyptus trees cut down and today, I started cutting them to air dry. While I’m cutting the wood, The first 6 or 7 inches cut fine but then I noticed that the bandsaw has to really work at cutting through the wood after that. I turn off the bandsaw and find that the gullets are clogged with wood. I go about removing it but it takes a long time so eventually I resort to taking a brass brush to the blade while its’ running, which kind of works. Has anyone ever dealt with this? Do they sell special blades for sawing green wood?
Ok next question, I’m cleaning up at the end of the day and the blade is encrusted with sawdust. Its’ really hard and caked on the blade. It is really hard to get off, even taking a stiff brass brush to it hardly works so I just left it on and hope it doesn’t rust. Any ideas on how to remove it? I can scrape it off manually with a screw driver but that takes a while.
Last question, anyone ever try using eucalytus wood? I’m having second thoughts on trying to mill it since I never heard of anyone using eucalytus to make furniture. I just figured its’ free so I might as well try although most of my pieces are less than 2 ft long. I’m wondering how it looks and why I never heard of anyone using it for fine furniture since it grows so fast.
Thank you!

-Carl


19 replies so far

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93mwm

59 posts in 2076 days


#1 posted 03-16-2009 10:01 AM

im pretty sur jarrah is an example of a good eucalypt,used for fairly fine furnitture(or decking), as for the rest ive never really had to deal with so the best of luck to you

-- mwm! Before you criticise walk a mile in their shoes, and when you do criticise you will be a mile away and have their shoes!

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Julian

880 posts in 2181 days


#2 posted 03-16-2009 03:39 PM

What type of blade are you using? You should have a blade with only 3 tpi so the sawdust has a chance to escape without clogging.

-- Julian, Park Forest, IL

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Padre

930 posts in 2145 days


#3 posted 03-17-2009 01:14 AM

Julian beat me to it, so: What he said!!

-- Chip -----------http://www.penmanchip.com-----------------Micah 6:8

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cmaeda

205 posts in 2210 days


#4 posted 03-17-2009 06:39 AM

Rob: The wood is free because the power company cut them down since they were too close to their power lines. So far, the wood is really nice… pinkish/red. But I wasn’t sure how it would perform as a furniture wood.
Julian: I’m using a 3/4” 3 TPI blade. The wood is so wet that it just clumps everywhere including the gullets of the blade. It still cuts normal dried wood just fine after I cleared out the gullets.

Thanks for the help so far.

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mmh

3422 posts in 2378 days


#5 posted 03-17-2009 07:32 AM

Sounds like good hardwood. I have some blue gum and red gum eucalyptus. The blue gum is very textured, almost a porous spongy look but the wood is quite hard. The red gum is more of a traditional solid, fine texture. I haven’t done much work with them yet, but they seem to be good candidates for anything durable. You’ll want to seal the ends with Anchorseal or a similar product.

-- "They who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night." ~ Edgar Allan Poe

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TopamaxSurvivor

14752 posts in 2332 days


#6 posted 03-17-2009 08:50 AM

I don’t know if this will work on your wood, but cutting really pitchy fir, I squirt kerosene on the chain to keep it clear. It made a big difference, but that is a different situation.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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cmaeda

205 posts in 2210 days


#7 posted 03-17-2009 09:02 AM

I think I do have red gum eucalyptus. I’m going to try waxing the blades. I’m not sure about kerosene, it might eat the band saw tires.

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TopamaxSurvivor

14752 posts in 2332 days


#8 posted 03-17-2009 09:26 AM

I thought about the tires after i wrote that ;-(

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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cmaeda

205 posts in 2210 days


#9 posted 03-18-2009 06:14 AM

I tried waxing the blades today… works better but it still clogs. I’m not sure what to try next. Any suggestions?
Maybe I can let the logs dry for a bit.

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TopamaxSurvivor

14752 posts in 2332 days


#10 posted 03-18-2009 07:49 AM

I have some used saw mill blade. It has very shallow teeth. How deep are the ones that are plugging up?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Paul's profile

Paul

345 posts in 2245 days


#11 posted 03-18-2009 06:34 PM

Had the same problem with some green Alder that I was cutting, finally gave up and let it dry for awhile before cutting.

-- If you say 'It's good enough', it probably isn't.

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2305 days


#12 posted 03-18-2009 07:26 PM

I’m with Paul on that one – I’d let it dry before trying to mill it to boards. I have Some apple tree logs that were left as is to let dry before bandsawing them (which will be the next step).

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

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cmaeda

205 posts in 2210 days


#13 posted 03-18-2009 10:25 PM

TopamaxSurvivor: The teeth are about 1/4” deep, maybe a little longer.

Yeah, I’m going to let it dry for a month or so.

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TopamaxSurvivor

14752 posts in 2332 days


#14 posted 03-19-2009 01:54 AM

That is about what the old sawmill blade is. Sounds like it is chainsaw or wait.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View degoose's profile

degoose

7013 posts in 2011 days


#15 posted 04-07-2009 01:21 PM

Here in Aussie we use ‘Gum’ trees all the time Red gum, white gum, river gum, swamp gum, Sydney blue gum, rose gum, quiggley gum, spotted gum, jarrah Grey and Red Ironbark and stringy bark…as well as the timbers marketed as Victorian Ash, Mountain Ash and Tasmanian Oak,, all eucalypts Most are slabbed first and let air dry then milled into boards if they are not used as slab furniture.

-- Drink twice... and don't bother to cut... @ lazylarrywoodworks.com.au For lovers of all things timber...

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