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How would I create this handle using my router table?

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Forum topic by WoodChuck_SF posted 01-10-2015 07:48 PM 1162 views 1 time favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WoodChuck_SF

7 posts in 698 days


01-10-2015 07:48 PM

I was thinking of trying to make this box, and wasn’t sure how I’d make the top piece. My first guess would be to use my router table and a dish cutter bit. Any suggestions?

Thanks!

 photo box.jpg

 photo dish.jpg


14 replies so far

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Rick M

7923 posts in 1845 days


#1 posted 01-11-2015 02:20 AM

I think you have it.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View ElChe's profile

ElChe

630 posts in 802 days


#2 posted 01-11-2015 05:28 AM

Given the continuous grain on the lid I wonder if it is a steam bent lid? My concern with carving the lid with a router bowl bit is that the vertical part of the lid would be very weak.

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

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WoodChuck_SF

7 posts in 698 days


#3 posted 01-11-2015 05:52 AM

Here’s better photo of the handle:

 photo handle2.jpg

View Andre's profile

Andre

1023 posts in 1271 days


#4 posted 01-11-2015 06:04 AM

James would carve it hand.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 951 days


#5 posted 01-11-2015 06:26 AM

I’d say it would work.

Might want to edit your title to say router instead of jointer.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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WoodChuck_SF

7 posts in 698 days


#6 posted 01-11-2015 06:42 AM

Thank you!


I d say it would work.

Might want to edit your title to say router instead of jointer.

- TheFridge


View levan's profile

levan

472 posts in 2445 days


#7 posted 01-11-2015 10:49 AM

I think you have it also. I would get rid of a lot of the waste with the table saw. Removing that much wood from one side of the board, may cause it to want it to move a little. I wonder if the lid part might want to be left a little thick, just in case it curls a bit, you could still face plane to flatten.

best wishes
Lynn

-- "If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing, you're right". Henry Ford

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

3668 posts in 1186 days


#8 posted 01-11-2015 01:17 PM

I would first remove as much as possible with the tablesaw before cutting the final radius on the router table. The dish cutter bit looks like the way to go if the radius you are trying to achieve is the same as that of your bit.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

628 posts in 1418 days


#9 posted 01-11-2015 04:22 PM

I can’t tell the dimensions from the pics, but if that ridge is very high you would need a really long shaft on the router bit. I also wonder about supporting the piece while you work it.

Perhaps the rough shape was made by a series of rip cuts on the table saw with increasing depth to match the curve followed by hand scraping. That would give you good support during the machining. It appears that the handle is centered on the lid so you could make one cut, rotate the piece to cut the other side, raise the blade, adjust the fence, and repeat until you had the maximum depth. Then the waste could be cut off the face of the lid.

I imagine that you could take a card scraper and grind it to the desired curve profile, sharpen it, and then have the smooth curve in no time.

View ElChe's profile

ElChe

630 posts in 802 days


#10 posted 01-11-2015 04:51 PM

Thx for updated pic. I’d dado out most of material on one side in a series of passes. With the last pass on the handle side leave enough material for the curve to be shaped in. Then double tape stick a runner to same thickness of stock on the side with waste removed. Start dadoing out the waste on other side ( again leaving enough wood to accommodate the curve). You can Affix a similar runner on that side for stability. For the curve I agree with prior poster that length of shaft on bowl bit will limit how high you can go with the lid detail. A card scraper with a radius may be the way to go if you don’t have enough bit.

-- Tom - Measure twice cut once. Then measure again. Curse. Fudge.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

628 posts in 1418 days


#11 posted 01-11-2015 05:17 PM

I think we are on the same train of thought here. However, by starting in the middle as I suggested you can rough out the curve on both sides without the need to fasten a runner for support. Then the remainder of the wood can be cut off leaving two nice pieces for other use. If that cut would be too deep for the maximum height on the tabesaw it could be started with the power tool and finished by hand. Turning so much good stock into sawdust by dadoing it away seems a shame.

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WoodChuck_SF

7 posts in 698 days


#12 posted 01-12-2015 12:25 AM

Kazooman,

Yes, it seems that if I had a longer shaft bit I’d be in good shape, but most that I see have about a 1 1/4 length, so I might just be out of luck. The size of the lid is approx. 5” x 12”. Not sure if I can find a bit that will work :(

 photo grove4.jpg

View Buckethead's profile

Buckethead

3140 posts in 1334 days


#13 posted 01-12-2015 01:01 AM

A nice moulding plane (round) would seem like a fun option. That is a lovely handle, lid, and box.

-- Support woodworking hand models. Buy me a sawstop.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2189 posts in 1490 days


#14 posted 01-12-2015 04:58 AM

If you have a bandsaw of sufficient height capacity, you could easily cut those coves while holding the wood vertically. The resulting rough cut would be easy to scrape/sand smooth. The ends would need to be perfectly square to give you the needed stability.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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