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Forum topic by Eddy posted 03-15-2009 04:45 AM 1455 views 1 time favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Eddy

25 posts in 2045 days


03-15-2009 04:45 AM

Topic tags/keywords: workbench

Hi.
I am a certified carpenter so I am not new to building. I am an amateur in fine woodworking. I am going to be designing a work bench very soon. I would like to make it with the pit for wood shavings to be pushed into. Besides that does anyone have any suggestions?

-- Edward


20 replies so far

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2673 days


#1 posted 03-15-2009 04:51 AM

Make everything thick and heavy so it doesn’t move around.

A lot of people seem to like those pockets in their tables. I still haven’t heard a good reason for it. I would think that it would just end up being a general storage area for tools and chips.

But that’s just me. :-)

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View Francisco Luna's profile

Francisco Luna

936 posts in 2078 days


#2 posted 03-15-2009 05:37 AM

Welcome to lumber Jocks, hope you enjoy the site.There are hundreds of workbenches, vises and styles, depending the type of work you do. As Gary says, consider something heavy and take your time to research about the type of vises that best fit your needs. You are welcome to visit my Flickr, I have pictures about a workbench I built, they can give you some insight.

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2394 posts in 2122 days


#3 posted 03-15-2009 05:45 AM

Then again you can try here for a bench that is different.

http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/Workshop/WorkshopArticle.aspx?id=28530

I built one like it but heavier.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/14382

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2673 days


#4 posted 03-15-2009 06:00 AM

I forgot, this is mine:

Click for details

It weight 200+ pounds. It doesn’t even vibrate when you hit it. It was my dream workbench.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8791 posts in 2784 days


#5 posted 03-15-2009 06:10 AM

I did a blog on workbenches because I did not go with a traditional design. It may give you some information to consider one way or another. There are pictures of my various tables. I guess that I call them work tables or assembly tables as opposed to benches.

You can read the blog here: http://lumberjocks.com/jocks/toddc/blog/2359

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View John's profile

John

169 posts in 2478 days


#6 posted 03-15-2009 12:54 PM

I built my first one from southern yellow pine to figure out what I liked without spending a lot of money. Can’t remember where I found the plan online. Is the “Pit for wood shavings” a tool tray? My tool tray collects dust and shavings very nicely. Next bench wont have a tool tray. Instead I’m planning on the under bench storage cabinet. I’m planning on making the Lon Schleining essential workbench with a tail vise instead of the twin screw. It will look just like GaryK’s.

http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/ProjectsAndDesign/ProjectsAndDesignPDF.aspx?id=2882
http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/ProjectsAndDesign/ProjectsAndDesignPDF.aspx?id=25191
http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/ProjectsAndDesign/ProjectsAndDesignPDF.aspx?id=2762
http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/ProjectsAndDesign/ProjectsAndDesignPDF.aspx?id=2839
http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/ProjectsAndDesign/ProjectsAndDesignPDF.aspx?id=2820
http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/ProjectsAndDesign/ProjectsAndDesignPDF.aspx?id=2714
http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/ProjectsAndDesign/ProjectsAndDesignPDF.aspx?id=2129
http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/ProjectsAndDesign/ProjectsAndDesignPDF.aspx?id=1985

-- Brain the size of a planet and they have me parking cars.

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2394 posts in 2122 days


#7 posted 03-15-2009 01:03 PM

I agree with John, I’ve just got to have that broad shelf under the bench just to get stuff off from it when I need to. And when I’m removing a bunch of clamps without the shelf, where do you put them, on the floor? For those who hang each one up as they remove it, that’s great. For me everything pretty much stays out until a job is done. The shelf pretty much catches everything. If I had a side pocket to catch stuff it often would overfill either with tools or shavings pretty quickly.

Another thing I find handy sometimes. My bench (link a couple of posts above) has a 1 1/2” top that is fairly deep. I often need to clamp to the bench. The size of the top, especially the depth really assists with that.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View spanky46's profile

spanky46

977 posts in 2075 days


#8 posted 03-15-2009 01:30 PM

Mine is simple but functional.
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/14133
http://lumberjocks.com/jocks/spanky46/workshop

-- spanky46 -- Never enough clamps...Never enough tools...Never enough time.

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2507 days


#9 posted 03-15-2009 01:49 PM

I have to agree with Gary about the pit. My current bench has one and it just seems to collect tools and dust. And seems to create problems when I want to work on the bench surface or try to clamp a piece across the top. When I redesign it I will eliminate it.

A good resource to use is Christopher Schwarz’s book Workbenches from Design and Theory to Construction and Use. I found it helpful in deciding how to construct a quality bench. The bottom line is to make it heavy. Schwaz’s benches run 350+. But the big thing is to decide what type of work you want to do on the bench.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View kiwi1969's profile

kiwi1969

609 posts in 2127 days


#10 posted 03-15-2009 03:09 PM

Gday Eddy. I,m in the same boat as you ,my bench plans change at least once a week. There are as many workbench designs as there are woodworkers. You can spend a lot of time listening to experts who will tell you their bench is best because blah blah blah. In the seventies it was Tage Frids European bench, now everyone wants a Roubo thanks to Chris Swartz . Do you make jewelery boxes or Dining tables, do you use hand tools or power tools and so it goes on. I,m leaning towards something like Daniels bench as the removable clamps give you plenty of options, but i want to make it look like something from colonial times, but thats just me. Best advice I can give is ,just knock something up cheap and see if it works. If not you can change it at your leisure until you find what works for you. Then go crazy and build something special. Remember it,s your bench, you have to work there.

-- if the hand is not working it is not a pure hand

View mzmac's profile

mzmac

94 posts in 2352 days


#11 posted 03-15-2009 03:31 PM

My bench has done wonders for my shop and it was cheap. You also could add a tool or dust slot.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/10446

View Eduardo Rodriguez's profile

Eduardo Rodriguez

37 posts in 2055 days


#12 posted 03-15-2009 03:48 PM

The bench is a response of your work, as kiwi1969 says, there are as many workbench designs as there are woodworkers…Scott LandisĀ“s book can be a helpful way to realize what kind of workbench you need. I build for myself the European kind, i really like the open vise.

-- Tempus fugit...better work wood!!!

View marcb's profile

marcb

762 posts in 2358 days


#13 posted 03-15-2009 04:18 PM

I like the ones like the Roubo and Holtzapffel designs where the legs are flush with the edge of the top.

Gives you a chance to slap a clamp on something there.

Also Large face vice and smaller tail vice. This allows you to hold large boards on the face for when you need to build larger furniture.

I have a shelf under mine that I use to store heavy things to help add to the mass even more.

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1281 posts in 2422 days


#14 posted 03-15-2009 06:43 PM

You could also make a solid top bench and have a removable chip tray that can be stored elsewhere when not needed.

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2394 posts in 2122 days


#15 posted 03-15-2009 07:18 PM

Another thought about the ‘new fangled’ bench I built. It’s built of fir so it’s not that expensive. The center is plywood so it’s replaceable. The rest of the top is basically three pieces of 2×4 fir that was cut and planed from 2×12’s. The thing is held together with long drywall screws. If I ever wanted to replace the top after it gets banged up that won’t be an issue either cost or time wise.

Also, I wanted more weight than the original plans entailed so instead of the 2×6 leg structure I opted for 4×4’s for the entire legs and base. Still fir. It’s nice wood to work with.

You might consider the size also. I built my bench a little wider than standard. I don’t have a lot of space for another setup table so making it even 6 inches wider than might be standard allows the bench to comfortably hold clamps for gluing doors and such. When planing, you only use one side or an edge anyway so making it wider does not hinder anything.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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