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Can anyone identify this wood?

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Forum topic by DataDoc posted 07-24-2007 09:07 PM 1330 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DataDoc

12 posts in 3007 days


07-24-2007 09:07 PM

Topic tags/keywords: identify unknown wood species

I was driving along and saw a stack of limbs and some good sized (for me) trunk sections. I asked first and then loaded as many as my Focus could hold without tipping over backwards. I skinned off the bark on all but the most limb-ridden piece, and was cleaning up the mess when my wife asked “What type of wood is that?” I said it looks like blackgum to me (see http://forestry.about.com/library/tree/blbltup.htm ), but I’m not sure.

The bark slices off pretty easily and is in several layers; rough outer bark, thin brown layer below that, and a white pithy layer that turns reddish brown after 15 minutes or so. After being cut the wood turns reddish as well in a short time.
Debarked limbs and remaining trunk

Closeup showing bark and coloration.

Endgrain shows color and an inclusion

Closeup of layers of bark

Closeup of trunk

The white underbark will change to match the rest in about 15 minutes

Anyone know what it is? I plan on making a cutting board or two and some toy trains.

-- DataDoc, North Carolina, www.craigscrafts.com


24 replies so far

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3044 days


#1 posted 07-24-2007 09:26 PM

My wild guess is it could be Apple. It bark looks like Apple also.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

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DataDoc

12 posts in 3007 days


#2 posted 07-24-2007 09:45 PM

Dick, that might be a good guess, what with the quick oxidation, just like apple slices do. I scanned in some leaves that I collected while removing the bark. Maybe it can confirm your guess.

Leaves from the same tree

-- DataDoc, North Carolina, www.craigscrafts.com

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2733 days


#3 posted 07-24-2007 10:06 PM

Looks like your state flower to me by looking at the leaf. That would make it a Flowering Dogwood.
Is it pinkish on the inside?

That’s a great fine grained wood. It can be used as a subsitute for boxwood. It turns really great also.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

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DataDoc

12 posts in 3007 days


#4 posted 07-24-2007 10:21 PM

I walked outside and compared it to our dogwood, and its leaves are narrower and longer and a different attachment. Thanks anyway.

I do have some dogwood, from a tree owned by a former member of the famed Tuskegee Airmen, and that wood is pink. I carved a spoon for my wife’s birthday and it colors like olivewood from use.

Here’s my final scan of a piece of bark.Bark of ?

-- DataDoc, North Carolina, www.craigscrafts.com

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GaryK

10262 posts in 2733 days


#5 posted 07-24-2007 10:31 PM

I guess our Dogwoods here in Texas are more broad leaved.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View Ethan Sincox's profile

Ethan Sincox

765 posts in 2919 days


#6 posted 07-24-2007 10:59 PM

There are actually 15 different varieties of dogwood that are native to north america and more than 40 worldwide (many of those can be found in N. America as well; they just aren’t native).

I don’t have my hand on my tree identification book right now; I’ll see if I can check it tonight and come up wtih something for you.

Off-hand, though, the heartwood doesn’t look like the flowering dogwood I’ve trimmed so many times in my parents’ yard – it is a wonderful nutty brown color. (And unfortunately, dogwood is subject to a lot of internal stressing and you will rarely see a good piece of it without some sort of checking.) I don’t think the dogwood has serrated leaf edges, and I recall the bark being more smooth, too…

Your images are quite good, though, so it shouldn’t take long to pinpoint. I’ll get back with you.

-- Ethan, http://thekiltedwoodworker.com

View Nicky's profile

Nicky

636 posts in 2837 days


#7 posted 07-25-2007 02:33 AM

Osage Orange.

I’m just guessing though.

-- Nicky

View Ethan Sincox's profile

Ethan Sincox

765 posts in 2919 days


#8 posted 07-25-2007 04:44 AM

Eh… unbeknownst to myself, I must have been smoking crack earlier. I was totally thinking of the redbud in my front yard when I was talking about dogwood. Redbud has rich brown heartwood.

The leaf of the apple tree has very distinct alternating veins and these are very bi-lateral.

Bhah… I couldn’t find anything in my N. American field guide that looked like those leaves…

-- Ethan, http://thekiltedwoodworker.com

View Bob Babcock's profile

Bob Babcock

1804 posts in 2831 days


#9 posted 07-25-2007 04:46 AM

Could be redbud but the fruit looks wrong. Are the leaves alternating or opposite each other on the branch? Tough to tell in some spots on that twig. It does look like a dogwood of some kind.

http://www.oplin.lib.oh.us/tree/leaf/leaf%20pages/074a%20not%20lobed%20shorter/shorter.html

I don’t know though something looks wrong.

-- Bob, Carver Massachusetts, Sawdust Maker http://www.capecodbaychallenge.org

View Karson's profile

Karson

34912 posts in 3145 days


#10 posted 07-25-2007 04:50 AM

I’ve never seen a box elder tree, but the picture that you showed of the wood reminds me of that . Who just turned the Box elder bowel maybe they can identify the bark.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3044 days


#11 posted 07-25-2007 06:02 AM

Box elder looks similar to a Maple leaf.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Bob Babcock's profile

Bob Babcock

1804 posts in 2831 days


#12 posted 07-25-2007 06:04 AM

I think you may be right about it being blackgum.
http://www.oplin.lib.oh.us/tree/fact%20pages/blackgum/blackgum.html

-- Bob, Carver Massachusetts, Sawdust Maker http://www.capecodbaychallenge.org

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

3971 posts in 2809 days


#13 posted 07-25-2007 07:12 AM

Not dogwood. Dogwood leaves have leaf veins that run parallel to the leaf edges, and if you carefully break a green leaf, there are little spider webby looking white fibers that allow the broken section to dangle from the main section. Great magic trick for small children, ooh floating leaf ends (thanks Euell Gibbons, wherever you are).
Not blackgum, as they have smooth margins, these appear to serrated.

I am guessing it’s a crabapple.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View Drew1House's profile

Drew1House

425 posts in 2833 days


#14 posted 07-25-2007 07:44 AM

They have a really good plant database over at davesgarden.com… they should have it.

-- Drew, Pleasant Grove, Utah

View DataDoc's profile

DataDoc

12 posts in 3007 days


#15 posted 07-25-2007 08:22 AM

If you look at the full-sized picture of the leaves you can see most of them are rounded rather than pointed. I think crabapple is too pointy. Thanks for the guess.

-- DataDoc, North Carolina, www.craigscrafts.com

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