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Need Suggestion on Laminate Floor TS Blade

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Forum topic by dlux posted 03-14-2009 10:12 PM 1223 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dlux

54 posts in 2894 days


03-14-2009 10:12 PM

I’m about to install some laminate flooring in my house that will require some cutting. We’re still trying to decide between a 3mm or 12mm flooring that we like. However, in the mean time, I’d like to get a blade for my TS being that we will make this deicision soon. I’ve got a 40T WWII but I’m not sure with the wood being so thin if I should be cutting with at least an 80T?????

So the suggestions that I need are:
1) # of teeth
2) brand

Thanks in advance!


8 replies so far

View tyson's profile

tyson

43 posts in 2845 days


#1 posted 03-14-2009 11:01 PM

i cut my laminate with a 28 tooth and had no problems. i would test a scrap piece. i wouldent spend too much because the hard laminate will kill your blade. i did 860 sq ft with 1 blade on 12 mm flooring but when i was done the blade was shot

-- a truly wise man never plays leap frog with a unicorn

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knotscott

7208 posts in 2836 days


#2 posted 03-15-2009 02:13 AM

Flooring can be tough on saw blades. Something with a triple chip grind (TCG) will have the longest edge life if all else is equal. If the cuts will be visible it might be worth getting a good one with a fairly high tooth count. The Freud LU82M010 is a 60T FTG that should hold up well, do a decent job, and doesn’t cost an arm and a leg…Amazon ($42 shipped) and Ebay often have deals on them. The Infinity 010-380 80T TCG blade should be outstanding…$80. If those are both more than you’d like to invest for this application, you might try an Oshlun TCG blade…Amazon has a couple in the $25-$30 range (shipped). These have C4 carbide and are surprisingly well made for the price…they were formerly Avenger.

Good luck!

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Karson

35035 posts in 3861 days


#3 posted 03-15-2009 04:07 AM

I would agree on the triple chip grid. And you can have blades sharpened. So you don’t destroy the blade.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

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TopamaxSurvivor

17654 posts in 3137 days


#4 posted 03-15-2009 08:50 AM

I quit cutting it on the TS. I found a fine tooth jig saw balde worked a lot better.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View dlux's profile

dlux

54 posts in 2894 days


#5 posted 03-17-2009 04:16 PM

This might sound stupid, but I don’t know much about the triple chip grind blades. If this project tends to tear blades up, I’d hate to spend all that money on a good Frued blade, just to have to dump it, so it sounds like TCG might be the way to go.

So, what’s the difference with the TCG blade and where can you get them sharpened? I know that to get my WWII blade sharpened that I send that back to Forrest, but not sure about the Oshlun blades.

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Karson

35035 posts in 3861 days


#6 posted 03-17-2009 04:35 PM

Triple chip blades are sharpened lby the same people that sharpen regular blades.

The triple chip design has one tip that is a few thousands high and it’s cut with the corners beveled off. So it’s design is to do most of the cutting. The next tip is a square tip and it is a little shorter that the triple cut chip. It’s purpose is to clean out the corners left by the first chip. This reduces chipping, because it’s a small piece of wood that is taken off.

A great blade for veneers, plywood etc. You may find these blades at HD or big blue. They are quite common. And no the blade is not destroyed. It may be just dull. Cutting wood doesn’t destroy a blade. A good blade will probably last a lifetime until the carbide is all sharpened away. If it’s warped then get rid of it. But cutting flooring should not warp a blade.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

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dlux

54 posts in 2894 days


#7 posted 03-17-2009 04:58 PM

Thanks for all the input. If you were me, would you go with the Frued (I just know their quality is outstanding) or the Oshlun TCG? They are both around the same price (for the 60T) at amazon, so that’s really not a factor in this decision.

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knotscott

7208 posts in 2836 days


#8 posted 03-17-2009 06:17 PM

Oshlun is typically a value line. For even money, I doubt it has any advantage over the Freud. If the savings are significant, then the Oshlun would have some appeal.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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